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Author Topic: Speed Reading Courses?  (Read 788 times)

sordomudo

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Speed Reading Courses?
« on: February 16, 2005, 06:56:15 PM »
Answers to any of the following apprecaited (only if answer to #1 is yes)

1. Have you/someone you know ever taken a speed reading course?
2. Was it worthwhile?
3. How long did it take to become proficient?
4. Where was it taken?
5. Do the benefits stay with you long after the fact?
6. Would it be a good idea before 1L?

sordomudo

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2005, 08:37:09 PM »
Bump b/c I'm getting NO love.

I hear America singing

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2005, 08:44:36 PM »
Law school reading required copious and fastidious amounts of higher-level thinking skills; as such, time spent reading is not so much spent on reading as thinking.

I could "read" a case in ten minutes, by the most literal definition of the word, but it could very easily take three hours or more to delve into all of the intricacies associated with said case.  This is why law students spend time in the library- not because they're working on phonics and reading speed.

I think that a speed-reading course would be a waste of time.  If you find a speed-thinking course, however, let me know.  That's the only course that will help in law school.
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sordomudo

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2005, 08:56:25 PM »
Law school reading required copious and fastidious amounts of higher-level thinking skills; as such, time spent reading is not so much spent on reading as thinking.

I could "read" a case in ten minutes, by the most literal definition of the word, but it could very easily take three hours or more to delve into all of the intricacies associated with said case.  This is why law students spend time in the library- not because they're working on phonics and reading speed.

I think that a speed-reading course would be a waste of time.  If you find a speed-thinking course, however, let me know.  That's the only course that will help in law school.

Uhh, okay.

dr_draino

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2005, 09:09:41 PM »
Law school reading required copious and fastidious amounts of higher-level thinking skills; as such, time spent reading is not so much spent on reading as thinking.

I could "read" a case in ten minutes, by the most literal definition of the word, but it could very easily take three hours or more to delve into all of the intricacies associated with said case.  This is why law students spend time in the library- not because they're working on phonics and reading speed.

I think that a speed-reading course would be a waste of time.  If you find a speed-thinking course, however, let me know.  That's the only course that will help in law school.

Uhh, okay.

LOL.

I have heard of some decent online programs but I forget their names.  I think it would be helpful, but not sure that I'm gonna be willing to do it.

EDIT:  by on-line I remember demo version were available for free download but it was like 70-120 bucks or soemthing for the full download

sordomudo

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2005, 10:26:02 PM »
Leave it to draino to get my back and help a brother out.  Thanks, man.

alb

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2005, 12:33:04 AM »
I agree that speed reading probably isn't useful, but I would HIGHLY recommend that anyone who isn't very proficient in typing spend some time this summer working on typing skills.  Many law schools give students the option of typing their exams, and you will have a huge advantage if you can type quickly and effortlessly.  The more automatic your typing process is, the better you'll be able to focus on the content of what you are typing (whether you are taking notes in class, preparing for class, or taking an exam). If, on the other hand, you have to concentrate on your typing to type, it may interfere with your ability to take notes or stay focused during an exam -- you may be better of hand-writing.

On a related note, I recommend that you decide early on whether you will write or type your exams, and then use that same method to take notes and study.  When I was studying for first semester exams, I actually practiced typing out my flashcards.  It is a good idea in preparing for an exam to simulate as closely as possible the means by which you are going to demonstrate what you know.  You will get a sense for whether things "look right" and "feel right".

lonahawk

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2005, 02:01:26 AM »
What would you say is a good speed for typing in law school?  I think i type okay  - but I'm not quite sure if it is good enough.

80/wpm

alb

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2005, 11:56:16 AM »
I don't think the actual speed matters so much (but 80wpm is fine).  You just want to be able to type without having to think about it.  You want to be at a point where you can formulate an idea in your head and quickly get it typed -- after a certain speed it won't really help you on an exam because your brain probably can't work that fast anyways.

Oh, and another advantage I failed to mention regarding typing exams is the opportunity to cut and paste and use spellcheck. 

If you're really fast at typing, however, you may want to avoid slipping into the habit of book briefing and just get everything that's relevant into your case briefs, because it will make it heaps easier when you're creating outlines (just cut and paste). 

texas1

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Re: Speed Reading Courses?
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2005, 09:16:02 PM »
Answers to any of the following apprecaited (only if answer to #1 is yes)

1. Have you/someone you know ever taken a speed reading course?
2. Was it worthwhile?
3. How long did it take to become proficient?
4. Where was it taken?
5. Do the benefits stay with you long after the fact?
6. Would it be a good idea before 1L?

1. Yes I have.
2. Yes it was.
3. Hard to tell. We took a test at the beginning of the course and I was already reading at a speed reading level...but after a few weeks I was reading at those ridiculous rates.
4. At my undergrad (it was a 1hr credit course that met for half a semester I think).
5. Yes...much of the techniques and advice stay with you...of course like anything else if you don't maintain it your proficiency drops.
6. Maybe...like others have said it won't help with a brief. Plus I was a theology major, and I speak from experience when I say that the more complex the material (scientific, medical, philosophical) the harder it is to maintain speed, because you have to reflect on what you are reading. But the techniques are still useful. They will break you of some bad habits. And if you have to uncritically read a lot of material it will be very useful.