Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

The Infamous "Most Difficult Law School Class" Poll:

I'm a law student and K is the most difficult class.
 17 (8.8%)
I'm a law student and Torts is the most difficult class.
 4 (2.1%)
I'm a law student and Crim Law is the most difficult class.
 2 (1%)
I'm a law student and Civ Pro is the most difficult class.
 23 (11.9%)
I'm a law student and Con Law is the most difficult class.
 12 (6.2%)
I'm a law student and Property is the most difficult class.
 16 (8.2%)
I'm a law student and LRW is the most difficult class.
 7 (3.6%)
I'm not a law student but I think Contracts would be the most difficult class.
 13 (6.7%)
I'm not a law student but I think Torts would be the most difficult class.
 13 (6.7%)
I'm not a law student but I think Criminal Law would be the most difficult class.
 3 (1.5%)
I'm not a law student but I think Civil Procedure would be the most difficult class.
 25 (12.9%)
I'm not a law student but I think Constitutional Law would be the most difficult class.
 14 (7.2%)
I'm not a law student but I think Property would be the most difficult class.
 18 (9.3%)
I'm not a law student but I think Legal Research & Writing would be the most difficult class.
 27 (13.9%)

Total Members Voted: 146

Author Topic: 1L's & Current Black Law Students  (Read 277073 times)

A.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4880 on: November 28, 2008, 09:51:45 AM »
If you were an editor before, I don't think being a senior editor (assuming this is not a board position) gets you much except being able to say you were on the journal another year...and that's of dubious value.  In my experience, the fact that you were on a journal matters more than how long you did it.  That said, if being a senior editor isn't that much work, then you might do it just for kicks.

justGem

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4881 on: November 28, 2008, 09:57:14 AM »
If you were an editor before, I don't think being a senior editor (assuming this is not a board position) gets you much except being able to say you were on the journal another year...and that's of dubious value.  In my experience, the fact that you were on a journal matters more than how long you did it.  That said, if being a senior editor isn't that much work, then you might do it just for kicks.

Actually, I did mean board position (forgot the appropriate term).  Does that change your response?

A.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4882 on: November 28, 2008, 10:46:42 AM »
Oh then yes, definitely do that.  Having a board position would definitely help with all of the above.  But there's usually a fairly substantial time commitment involved.  Do you know what position(s) you're interested in?

justGem

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4883 on: November 28, 2008, 11:32:39 AM »
Managing editor at the moment (see PM for reasons why). But not completely sure of all that it entails.  What do you mean by "fairly substantial time commitment"? Assuming how substantial is position dependent, do you know which positions require the greatest time commitment?

A.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4884 on: November 28, 2008, 11:47:09 AM »
The ME position is one of the most time-demanding b/c, at least on the journals I've worked on, the ME is responsible for layout, coordinating manpower for sourcecites and such, dealing with contracts, and a lot of other things that make the journal "work."  They're sort of like the COO of the journal.  And, depending on how often the journal publishes, it can be an all-encompassing job...the MEs on YLJ did little else, while the ME on my secondary journal could balance other things with it.  But my ME friends seemed to enjoy the work.  I think Sands might be able to provide more insight, though, since I think he was the ME of his law review.

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4885 on: November 28, 2008, 03:34:27 PM »
Right, I co-sign to what A said on the experience.  I was an ME for the law review at my school and getting a titled position was a pretty big deal within the journal, for reasons I didn't understand fully until I got into the practice. 

Our law review was basically divided into 2 halves in terms of production. We had the Articles Editors who would actually READ 100's and 100's of articles and recommend which articles we should publish.  To me, I didn't have that much time to read articles in depth b/c of some other commitments like BLSA and the like, and I was one of the rare breed who actually liked blue booking, so being a Managing Editor was right up my alley because the ME's on our law review basically took the articles recommended by the AE's, and assigned them out to the 2L slaves staff members to work on.  The 2L's would blue book and cite check the articles through several rounds, and at the end of each round I basically had to double check their work.  Fortunately, the 2L's who made law review tend to be fairly accurate with their blue booking and somewhat diligent with pulling sources so it made my job pretty easy to be honest.  I basically came in, took their work, fine tuned it, ran it past the EIC for a final review and then shipped it out to the publisher, lexis and westlaw.

As far as time commitment we published 4 times a year so whenever we got close to a publishing date it got hectic but that's to be expected. Aside from that, not too bad.  Again, I had a good staff so it helped out a lot. 

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justGem

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4886 on: November 28, 2008, 06:11:15 PM »
Right, I co-sign to what A said on the experience.  I was an ME for the law review at my school and getting a titled position was a pretty big deal within the journal, for reasons I didn't understand fully until I got into the practice. 

Our law review was basically divided into 2 halves in terms of production. We had the Articles Editors who would actually READ 100's and 100's of articles and recommend which articles we should publish.  To me, I didn't have that much time to read articles in depth b/c of some other commitments like BLSA and the like, and I was one of the rare breed who actually liked blue booking, so being a Managing Editor was right up my alley because the ME's on our law review basically took the articles recommended by the AE's, and assigned them out to the 2L slaves staff members to work on.  The 2L's would blue book and cite check the articles through several rounds, and at the end of each round I basically had to double check their work.  Fortunately, the 2L's who made law review tend to be fairly accurate with their blue booking and somewhat diligent with pulling sources so it made my job pretty easy to be honest.  I basically came in, took their work, fine tuned it, ran it past the EIC for a final review and then shipped it out to the publisher, lexis and westlaw.

As far as time commitment we published 4 times a year so whenever we got close to a publishing date it got hectic but that's to be expected. Aside from that, not too bad.  Again, I had a good staff so it helped out a lot. 


Why so (@ bolded)?  B/c of level of responsibility?

Our board is divided similarly but the "executive" editors review the 2L work so I imagine the responsibilities of the ME fall more in line with what Alci described.  We publish 6 issues per year  (oh joy!  :( ).

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4887 on: November 28, 2008, 07:24:39 PM »
Right, I co-sign to what A said on the experience.  I was an ME for the law review at my school and getting a titled position was a pretty big deal within the journal, for reasons I didn't understand fully until I got into the practice. 

Our law review was basically divided into 2 halves in terms of production. We had the Articles Editors who would actually READ 100's and 100's of articles and recommend which articles we should publish.  To me, I didn't have that much time to read articles in depth b/c of some other commitments like BLSA and the like, and I was one of the rare breed who actually liked blue booking, so being a Managing Editor was right up my alley because the ME's on our law review basically took the articles recommended by the AE's, and assigned them out to the 2L slaves staff members to work on.  The 2L's would blue book and cite check the articles through several rounds, and at the end of each round I basically had to double check their work.  Fortunately, the 2L's who made law review tend to be fairly accurate with their blue booking and somewhat diligent with pulling sources so it made my job pretty easy to be honest.  I basically came in, took their work, fine tuned it, ran it past the EIC for a final review and then shipped it out to the publisher, lexis and westlaw.

As far as time commitment we published 4 times a year so whenever we got close to a publishing date it got hectic but that's to be expected. Aside from that, not too bad.  Again, I had a good staff so it helped out a lot. 


Why so (@ bolded)?  B/c of level of responsibility?

Our board is divided similarly but the "executive" editors review the 2L work so I imagine the responsibilities of the ME fall more in line with what Alci described.  We publish 6 issues per year  (oh joy!  :( ).



Why so what exactly?
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

justGem

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4888 on: November 28, 2008, 07:29:53 PM »
Right, I co-sign to what A said on the experience.  I was an ME for the law review at my school and getting a titled position was a pretty big deal within the journal, for reasons I didn't understand fully until I got into the practice. 

Our law review was basically divided into 2 halves in terms of production. We had the Articles Editors who would actually READ 100's and 100's of articles and recommend which articles we should publish.  To me, I didn't have that much time to read articles in depth b/c of some other commitments like BLSA and the like, and I was one of the rare breed who actually liked blue booking, so being a Managing Editor was right up my alley because the ME's on our law review basically took the articles recommended by the AE's, and assigned them out to the 2L slaves staff members to work on.  The 2L's would blue book and cite check the articles through several rounds, and at the end of each round I basically had to double check their work.  Fortunately, the 2L's who made law review tend to be fairly accurate with their blue booking and somewhat diligent with pulling sources so it made my job pretty easy to be honest.  I basically came in, took their work, fine tuned it, ran it past the EIC for a final review and then shipped it out to the publisher, lexis and westlaw.

As far as time commitment we published 4 times a year so whenever we got close to a publishing date it got hectic but that's to be expected. Aside from that, not too bad.  Again, I had a good staff so it helped out a lot. 


Why so (@ bolded)?  B/c of level of responsibility?

Our board is divided similarly but the "executive" editors review the 2L work so I imagine the responsibilities of the ME fall more in line with what Alci described.  We publish 6 issues per year  (oh joy!  :( ).



Why so what exactly?

LOL, sorry...forgot to bold the statement (obviously).

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4889 on: November 28, 2008, 07:43:54 PM »
Oh right.  It becomes a big deal b/c people still put it on their attorney profile and there's a negative assumption rightly or wrongly that if you made journal and DIDN'T take a "titled" position of some type then you took the lazy route/have a lazy work ethic.  Something analogous to how you would be perceived if you got into Harvard but them made all C's. (hardly possible but you get the point)

Plus for academia it is a must that you not only had a titled editor position, but you must also have been published.
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston