Law School Discussion

Poll

The Infamous "Most Difficult Law School Class" Poll:

I'm a law student and K is the most difficult class.
17 (8.7%)
I'm a law student and Torts is the most difficult class.
5 (2.6%)
I'm a law student and Crim Law is the most difficult class.
2 (1%)
I'm a law student and Civ Pro is the most difficult class.
23 (11.7%)
I'm a law student and Con Law is the most difficult class.
12 (6.1%)
I'm a law student and Property is the most difficult class.
16 (8.2%)
I'm a law student and LRW is the most difficult class.
7 (3.6%)
I'm not a law student but I think Contracts would be the most difficult class.
13 (6.6%)
I'm not a law student but I think Torts would be the most difficult class.
14 (7.1%)
I'm not a law student but I think Criminal Law would be the most difficult class.
3 (1.5%)
I'm not a law student but I think Civil Procedure would be the most difficult class.
25 (12.8%)
I'm not a law student but I think Constitutional Law would be the most difficult class.
14 (7.1%)
I'm not a law student but I think Property would be the most difficult class.
18 (9.2%)
I'm not a law student but I think Legal Research & Writing would be the most difficult class.
27 (13.8%)

Total Members Voted: 148

1L's & Current Black Law Students

Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4410 on: January 25, 2007, 08:55:51 AM »
Glad there's actually stuff you're excited about next semester.  As fo' me and my house...

Actually, Trial Practice should be fun.  Put my newly acquired Evidence knowledge to use.  Transnational law requires us  to present some group case study.  There are few things Alci loathes more than graded group work.  It's why I dropped out of the b-school in undergrad, and it's why I might be dropping this course...

But back to you.  Even though there might be a ton of stuff you like, I wouldn't over do it.  Come May, I don't want to hear you complaining about how many papers/finals you have to write! ;)

Yeah, I noticed that the pickings are kind of slim if you're not interested in social justice-ish stuff. You should take Land Transactions. That looks great and that would have been my black-letter stuff but it conflicts with Social Org. of Law.

I already know I'll be complaining! That's life in law school... ;)

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4411 on: January 25, 2007, 10:15:39 AM »
Thinking About Taboo Subjects -This course will consider how to think, write and speak about issues that tend to be taboo on university campuses. These include gender, racial, ethnic, cultural and religious differences; rape and child molestation, torture; eugenics; abortion; capital punishment; race specific affirmative action; misuses of the holocaust and holocaust denial; colonialism; cultural relativity; religious sensitivities; and other subjects to be directed by the class. The object of the class will be to consider how to do scholarship on such subjects. Experts and advocates will appear periodically as guests.

Legal Profession: The Responsibilities of Public Lawyers -Using case studies on lobbying, public conflict resolution, class-action litigation, community-based advocacy, and lawyering for the government, this course will explore the many tensions for public lawyers who advocate on behalf of clients, who seek to represent causes or 'public' interests or who engage in legislative advocacy, community organizing or facilitators of alternative forms of problem-solving and deliberation. In particular, we will focus on the philosophical, ethical, and strategic conflicts that confront or challenge lawyers who function as 'public' citizens.

Legal History: American Legal Education: Seminar: This seminar is designed for students who are genuinely interested in what has happened to them at law school and who would like to examine carefully the nature of their legal education. It is also a practical introduction to the many different careers available in legal education. We will commence with the English and Continental origins of legal scholarship and teaching, examine the development of formal legal education in America from the founding of the Litchfield and Harvard Law Schools to the rise of Legal Realism, and conclude with the pressing controversies facing America's law schools today. Among the topics covered will be the relationship between formal legal education and the practicing bar, the changing composition of the faculty and the student body, the early pedagogical controversies, the different methods and ends of modern legal instruction, and the role played by law schools in fundamental disputes about jurisprudence, political ideology, economics, and social reform.


The Government Lawyer (+ Clinical - hopefully at the AUSA here in Boston) - This course will examine the unique roles and responsibilities of the government lawyer. We will look at the differences in federal, state and local functions, powers and resources, and the relationship of civil enforcement to criminal prosecution. In examining the government lawyer's roles as enforcer, prosecutor, implementor of policy, advisor, defender, and advocate for justice and the public interest, we will consider a range of questions, including: Who is the 'client,' how do you structure discretion and choose priorities, decide what is the public interest, and implement your higher ethical and professional responsibility standards. We will consider the government lawyer's role in investigating cases and in dealing with the public, the press, victims, witnesses, informants, whistleblowers, defense counsel, judges, and enforcement agencies. The course will also examine current criminal and civil enforcement issues in the context of white-collar crime, urban violence, organized crime, and terrorism.

Dats my schedule after I make some changes.

Papers for all the classes.

(Edited - gave explanations 'cause the classes sound kinda random)

Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4412 on: January 27, 2007, 01:31:04 PM »
Is "Thinking About Taboo Subjects" a law school class?

I've recently had a better opportunity so I'm having to scratch Social Organization of Law and Proving Discrim and *possibly* Trial Practice off my schedule. I'm trying to figure out what to take instead. I'll have

Criminal Law
Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage
Antidiscrimination Law
Supervised Research: Legal Perspectives on Women in the Academy

If I get to keep Trial Practice, that's all I'll take. If I don't, I might choose between the following:

The First Amendment: This course will discuss the structure of the First Amendment protections for expression. Self-scheduled exam.

The Information Society: This course will study how the Internet and new information technologies affect liberty, democracy, and the production of democratic culture. A previous course on the First Amendment is helpful but not required. Topics will include (1) mass media concentration, (2) the proliferation of new forms of freedom of speech and democratic practice on the Internet, (3) how the digitally networked environment affects politics and journalism, (4)the emerging conflicts between freedom of speech and intellectual property, (5) the political economy of information production, (6) the constitutional and policy issues raised by filtering technology, (7) the regulation of virtual worlds, and (8) the use of new information technologies as methods of control and surveillance. Self-scheduled exam.

Local Government Law: With an increasing trend toward devolution, many important public policy areas have become impossible to understand without an appreciation of institutions of state and local government. This is true of environmental regulation, welfare law, health care, civil rights, workplace safety, and many more. Moreover, many policy areas traditionally within the control of state and local governments - education, family law, public health, land use planning, transportation, important aspects of taxation, etc. - have become increasingly complex and contentious. These issues often pit local governments against the federal government, their states, or other local governments; the winner often is the side that most effectively manipulates the rules delineating the respective powers of state and local governments. This course will explore the structures and powers of state and local governments. In doing so, it will test the implications of contrasting visions of local governments: as creatures of their states, as social and political communities, and as economic entities. The final month of the course then will apply these principles to study two of the most important contemporary issues in education law: education reform (including school financing and the No Child Left Behind Act) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Students will write several reaction papers throughout the term and then will have the option of a term paper or a self-scheduled twenty-four-hour take-home exam.

Justice: An examination of contemporary theories, together with an effort to assess their practical implications. Authors this year will include Peter Singer, Richard Posner, John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Michael Walzer, Marian Young, and Roberto Unger. Topics: animal rights, the status of children and the principles of educational policy, the relation of market justice to distributive justice, the status of affirmative action. Self-scheduled exam.

I have no idea which one I want to take and they all meet at the same time, so it will be hard to shop them. Can anyone help a sista out?

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4413 on: January 27, 2007, 05:18:31 PM »
Yes - the Taboo Subjects is a law school class.

First Amendment and Local government law both law seem interesting. Justice seems wack; having to read all that theoretical ish might get old but it might help your scholarship though. The Information Society seems like it has nothing to do with what you're interested in and wouldn't even remotely help impact your scholarship. Seems like an intellectual waste of time.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4414 on: January 27, 2007, 05:21:55 PM »
You have the rest of your life to specialize.  Nothing wrong with a little mental masturbation.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4415 on: January 27, 2007, 05:25:27 PM »
Nah.. just know the first assignment: Please purchase Sanford Levinson's "Torture" and read pp. 3-43.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4416 on: January 27, 2007, 05:26:21 PM »
You have the rest of your life to specialize.  Nothing wrong with a little mental masturbation.

This post might contain some valuable info... but i can't get past "mental masturbation."

cui bono?

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4417 on: January 29, 2007, 04:37:54 PM »
Okay so I have a question of leadership propriety/responsibility and I dunno where else to ask it.  Here's the situation-  this person who is basically out for themselves is buzzing around me lately trying to butter me up to get a nomination to a leadership position in BLSA, our local chapter. (but this person also wants a position higher up) I think this person would bring the organization straight down!  How do I say this without it coming across like I have some sort of personal issue with this person but say it with enough passion as to get the point across that this person is no good?  Some background:  I have a position in my local chapter and this is one person that I beat out to get it.   Or should I just have faith that people will see it for themselves?

The person just seems to be running to put something on the resume. 

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4418 on: January 29, 2007, 05:16:09 PM »
If its one thing I can't stand is a cat who's just out put BLSA on the resume.  The whole organization suffers.  Newsflash - THIS IS NOT A RESUME BUILDER.  As past National BLSA Chair Chris Chestnut (Florida BTW) told me one time, "bruh, firms couldn't care less about your involvement with BSLA."  This isn't undergrad, so anybody wanting to step up should be stepping up to serve.

Fortunately, law students are generally pretty observant; chances are this person has already told on him or herself and their true colors are exposed.  If they have any 1/2-way decent competition things should work themselves out nicely.


cui bono?

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Re: 1L's & Current Black Law Students
« Reply #4419 on: January 29, 2007, 05:45:17 PM »
If its one thing I can't stand is a cat who's just out put BLSA on the resume.  The whole organization suffers.  Newsflash - THIS IS NOT A RESUME BUILDER.  As past National BLSA Chair Chris Chestnut (Florida BTW) told me one time, "bruh, firms couldn't care less about your involvement with BSLA."  This isn't undergrad, so anybody wanting to step up should be stepping up to serve.

Fortunately, law students are generally pretty observant; chances are this person has already told on him or herself and their true colors are exposed.  If they have any 1/2-way decent competition things should work themselves out nicely.


Well this person is a 1L and the 1Ls see it.  Not much interaction with 2Ls and 3Ls.  The thing is  there won't be that much comp for any position.  Folks want me to go up against this person just to knock this person out but I'm running the election. Even if I do, this person will prolly switch to run for another position just to "get" something.  There will be some positions that are unopposed.  The steady decline of motivated membership is my main reason for not running. I think this person will really drop the ball. Let's put it this way -I'm thinking of writing a proposal for more appointed positions or more co-chaired positions just in case the 2Ls and 3Ls drop the ball and vote this person in.  It's that deep-lol  :D 

I just feel like I put a lot into this chapter {i.e., my "personal" connections became BLSA connections, etc.}  and I dont want to see it fail/fall under poor leadership.   :-X  I really did it to "serve". My president (3L) does not yet see this person's true colors and I'm afraid that'll hurt the organization. 

Actually u just gave me a good idea.  Perhaps I need to stress that when I write this letter to send out to the BLSA members. - not a resume builder...any stronger words to get this across?