Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

The Infamous "Most Difficult Law School Class" Poll:

I'm a law student and K is the most difficult class.
 17 (8.8%)
I'm a law student and Torts is the most difficult class.
 4 (2.1%)
I'm a law student and Crim Law is the most difficult class.
 2 (1%)
I'm a law student and Civ Pro is the most difficult class.
 23 (11.9%)
I'm a law student and Con Law is the most difficult class.
 12 (6.2%)
I'm a law student and Property is the most difficult class.
 16 (8.2%)
I'm a law student and LRW is the most difficult class.
 7 (3.6%)
I'm not a law student but I think Contracts would be the most difficult class.
 13 (6.7%)
I'm not a law student but I think Torts would be the most difficult class.
 13 (6.7%)
I'm not a law student but I think Criminal Law would be the most difficult class.
 3 (1.5%)
I'm not a law student but I think Civil Procedure would be the most difficult class.
 25 (12.9%)
I'm not a law student but I think Constitutional Law would be the most difficult class.
 14 (7.2%)
I'm not a law student but I think Property would be the most difficult class.
 18 (9.3%)
I'm not a law student but I think Legal Research & Writing would be the most difficult class.
 27 (13.9%)

Total Members Voted: 146

Author Topic: 1L's & Current Black Law Students  (Read 279452 times)

Ladyday

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #120 on: February 25, 2005, 01:34:19 AM »
See I realize that law school is very different from UG. I'm going into the game expecting that I will probably be stretched to the limits and challenged beyond my wildest dreams. Sounds exciting actually. UG has become boring b/c I'm not challenged. Everything is easy for me. I don't even have to go to class and get A's on the midterms without picking up a book. That's boring to me. I need something that will keep my on my P's and Q's.


True...but we're two different people Lil_token. I handle pressure differently from other people.

Regal,

Listen to lil here. She is speaking the truth. We aren't trying to scare you or undermine your abilities, we're telling you that it's VERY different. My mother for a moment thought something had possessed her daughter. You see, I was just like you, never went to class, didn't study for *&^%, and would always pull good grades. On top of that, I would almost never go a day without talking to moms. When her daughter called her one day after weeks of no communication, at work, freaking out, she thought I had really lost it. Not her daughter who she's hardly ever see pick up a book but brought home straight A's.

I'm just saying don't get OVER-CONFIDENT, be cautious. And stay focused.

Of course I wish you and everyone else the best of luck, and all of you will have me, Sands, blk_reign, Lil, Blue, SMU, Bubbazz and others to come to whenever you need the support.

lil_token

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #121 on: February 25, 2005, 01:36:44 AM »
Sample UG writing:

In his radical text, The Souls of Black Folk, W. E. B. Du Bois attempts to grapple with the subordination of African Americans in the dawn of the twentieth century.  The text is likely intended to emphasize the forced submission of blacks to the societal notions of inequality propagated by institutional forces, as well as a to critique the popularly accepted remedies to post-slavery tensions offered by figures like Booker T. Washington. A significant portion of the frame of Du Bois’ argument rests on conceptual pillars of sociology.  While exploring the dual consciousness of African Americans, he utilizes structuralist theory and the notion of a self-fulfilling prophecy to explain the degradation of African Americans, as well as to recommend a radical change in the struggle for advancement in post-slavery society.
Central to the understanding of The Souls of Black Folk is the concept of dual consciousness.  This recurring theme is sometimes paired with the metaphor of the veil to illustrate confusion surrounding the internal and external sources of identity of African Americans.  Du Bois outlines the problematic areas of African American identity as early as the first chapter of his work.  He sets up the argument by emphasizing the way in which the African culture is portrayed as inferior to many European and Asian cultures.  He calls the Negro a “sort of seventh son” whose cultural contribution to the world is perceived as marginal at best (651).  This example serves as a testament to the way in which whites tend to regard all that is African, or in some way linked to African roots, is innately inferior to cultures of lighter skinned people.  Du Bois argues that when this theory is backed by societal institutions and introduced as fact to African Americans, it initiates an external force that significantly affects their self identification.  As a result of this force, blacks view themselves through a mirror skewed by whites and their Eurocentric ideology.  This externally imposed image is constantly at war with the self-generated image of the African American.  This conflict is what creates the notion of the double consciousness.  To Du Bois, double consciousness is the irreconcilable difference between the two images.  This two-ness is problematic because it creates a Negro and an American as separate entities in one body.  Throughout the remainder of the text, Du Bois urges Negroes to become African Americans by gaining insight into their intrinsic cultural, economic and social worth and by demanding rights allotted to all Americans.


Sample Law School Writing:

Transformative Elements:
   The court is likely to find that the transformation of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s image into a bobbing head doll wearing a three-piece suit and carrying an automatic weapon is sufficient to warrant First Amendment protection.  A balancing test that weighs First Amendment interest against the right to publicity is used to determine if a work has sufficient transformative elements to receive First Amendment protection, and thus, bar a statutory claim.  The inquiry seeks to determine if  a work in question adds “significant creative elements so as to be transformed into something more than a mere celebrity likeness or imitation.”  Comedy,  25 Cal. 4th 387, 399.  A work is said to have significant transformative elements if the celebrity’s likeness is only a component of the raw materials from which the work is synthesized and if the product in question so transforms the likeness as to make that product primarily the artist’s expression rather than the likeness of the celebrity. Id. at p.407.
   Courts have often taken an ad-hoc approach to the determination of whether a work contains enough transformative elements as to warrant protection under the First Amendment.  However, the more creative elements the work contains, the less likely it is to infringe on economic rights and the right to publicity protected by Section 3344.  See Comedy III Productions, Inc. v. Saderup, 25 Cal. 4th 387;  Winter v. DC Comics, 30 Cal. 4th 881.  The Winter court ruled that a comic book depiction of the Winter Brothers, a musical group, where the group members’ respective likenesses were attached to worm-like bodies, had sufficient transformative elements to evoke First Amendment protection. Winter,  30 Cal. 4th 881.
    The protections for parody, however, are not absolute.  A New Jersey District Court, in an appropriation of likeness claim against an Elvis Presley impersonator, ruled that although the public interest in entertainment allows for the occasional good-faith imitation of a celebrity to achieve commentary or humor, one cannot appropriate the valuable attributes of another’s likeness without permission from those who hold the rights to that likeness. Estate of  Presley v. Ressen, 513 F.Supp. 1339 (1981).  Nor have all courts agreed that First Amendment protections are limited to parody and imitation.  The Comedy court emphasized that “the transformative elements or creative contributions that require First Amendment protections are not confined to parody, and can take many forms, from factual reporting to subtle social criticism.” Comedy,  25 Cal. 4th 387, 406.

Regal_Muse

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #122 on: February 25, 2005, 01:39:28 AM »
Oh I don't think I'm being overly confident, just realistic. I never said law school was going to be easy, heck it's probably going to be the most challenging task in my life however; I don't plan on having a nervous breakdown. If I ever feel to the point where I can't take it anymore or where I might step off the edge, I'll call on a higher power.

Ladyday, I can definitely understand where you are coming from in terms of your mom. I talk to my mom like four or five times a day. I can't imagine having a day where I don't speak to her.

blk_reign

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #123 on: February 25, 2005, 01:40:38 AM »
You know the tragedy of it all  :'(... For the bar exam- they want you to unlearn the method of thinking that you spent three yrs mastering in law school... They want you to remove all theory out of your answers. Very few points are awarded for spotting issues...

As lame as it may sound..invest in the Gilbert Law audio tapes..they work wonders
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

Regal_Muse

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #124 on: February 25, 2005, 01:42:34 AM »
Eh....

lil_token

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #125 on: February 25, 2005, 01:43:37 AM »
You know the tragedy of it all  :'(... For the bar exam- they want you to unlearn the method of thinking that you spent three yrs mastering in law school... They want you to remove all theory out of your answers. Very few points are awarded for spotting issues...

As lame as it may sound..invest in the Gilbert Law audio tapes..they work wonders

Girl, between Gilbert's and E&E, I might have a tough time coming up with grocery money come finals!

blk_reign

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #126 on: February 25, 2005, 01:45:47 AM »
You know the tragedy of it all  :'(... For the bar exam- they want you to unlearn the method of thinking that you spent three yrs mastering in law school... They want you to remove all theory out of your answers. Very few points are awarded for spotting issues...

As lame as it may sound..invest in the Gilbert Law audio tapes..they work wonders

Girl, between Gilbert's and E&E, I might have a tough time coming up with grocery money come finals!

LOL :D
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

lil_token

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #127 on: February 25, 2005, 01:47:27 AM »
Oh I don't think I'm being overly confident, just realistic. I never said law school was going to be easy, heck it's probably going to be the most challenging task in my life however; I don't plan on having a nervous breakdown. If I ever feel to the point where I can't take it anymore or where I might step off the edge, I'll call on a higher power.

Ladyday, I can definitely understand where you are coming from in terms of your mom. I talk to my mom like four or five times a day. I can't imagine having a day where I don't speak to her.


I don't think ANYone PLANS on having a nervous breakdown or becoming depressed during law school.  *&^%, when I heard people predicting that gloom and doom, I was sure I was above, sure I was different.  No, ma'am, we are all weak and law school brings that out in ways you cannot possibly imagine.

Regal_Muse

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #128 on: February 25, 2005, 01:50:48 AM »
I suppose. We'll see. Feel free to use my post to say I told you so if I come in here crawling on hands and knees with a 40 in my mouth LOL. I've spoken to people who've done through grind of law school and each person is different. My cousin who went to Stanford said law school was very difficult but she didn't lose it. She felt frustration mostly from the dense reading. On the other hand, I have another cousin who called home crying everyday and had to be put on anti-depressants. I really think it depends on the individual.

lil_token

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Re: 1L's
« Reply #129 on: February 25, 2005, 01:56:17 AM »
Oh, and the difference in length of time spent on assignments is out of this world!

The sample UG paragraph is part of a 10 page paper, which took me about 4 hours to write.  Turned it in the next day and got an A.

The Sample LS paragraph alone (with all the revisions) took about 2 days.  Notice that it isn't even the final draft. :-\