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Author Topic: Negotiating with schools for $  (Read 64462 times)

mschuell

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #70 on: April 01, 2005, 05:33:37 PM »
Another good news story- I wrote a letter to Temple two weeks ago telling them about the Seton Hall offer (24K a year) and asking them to reconsider my file. 

I just got en email today notifying me that I was receiving a Law Faculty Scholar award, which is 7,500 a year, renewable, compared to the 10,000 First Year Scholar grant, not renewable that I initially received.



what does that do for where they rank with you?

Well it certainly makes things tougher- I am going to Newark next week and interviewing for the Seton Hall Distinguished Scholars Program. If they accept me, I think I will end up at Seton Hall- a free ride plus the opportunities of that program would be hard to turn down.  If I don't get it, then the decision gets really hard..though I would say I would lean to Temple at that point.

I really do love Philly and would prefer to practice there after graduation, but I am still trying to figure out if Temple gives me a better chance of good employment.  Also something I am looking at is how well I can do at each school- I know nothing is a sure bet, but it does seem that the competition would be slightly less at Seton Hall.

Do you have any more info on job placement you gleaned from your visits?  If I was convinced Temple was better for jobs in Philly than Seton Hall in Jersey, I would probably wind up at Temple.
3.35, 163

Attending: Seton Hall
Accepted:  Rutgers-Newark ($), Villanova, Brooklyn ($), Temple($),  American, Seton Hall($), Cardozo PT                      
Rejected: Fordham, GMU
Waitlisted:Pending:  None

SuperMoni

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #71 on: April 01, 2005, 09:42:07 PM »
I got a response to my request for more money from GW today and they said nope.

JDubs

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #72 on: April 02, 2005, 09:34:56 AM »
I really do love Philly and would prefer to practice there after graduation, but I am still trying to figure out if Temple gives me a better chance of good employment.  Also something I am looking at is how well I can do at each school- I know nothing is a sure bet, but it does seem that the competition would be slightly less at Seton Hall.

Do you have any more info on job placement you gleaned from your visits?  If I was convinced Temple was better for jobs in Philly than Seton Hall in Jersey, I would probably wind up at Temple.

To be honest, I know nothing of how well Seton Hall places.  I do know that the Philly area has a lot of law firms.  I get the impression that you'll have to be in the top 10-15% for a realistic shot at big law.  After that, there are dozens of small and mid-size firms that hire from there.  The other advantage of Temple (assuming Seton Hall does not really place all that well in NYC which seems to be your impression) is that it also has reach into South Jersey, Wilmington and the rest of PA.  I am not sure what type of law you are interested in, but there are a ton of biotech firms in the area which means a lot of IP related jobs.  There has also been a big push (via tax breaks) to get more corporations to think of Philly when choosing new offices.  This means that corporate/transaction lawyers will be in demand.  Finally, TU has one of the better Public Interest placement rates and their TrialAd program speaks for itself.

As I mentioned, I really don't know what Seton Hall offers in all of these areas and, with a full ride, it would be tough to pass up.  I wouldn't necessarily think it would be much different in terms of competition, because at both you'll need to be in the top 10% for big law.  After that, I am sure they both place well, I just think Temple has a bigger reach.

Good luck with the decision.
LSN

Going to Temple's Evening Program in '07!

marxie

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #73 on: April 04, 2005, 02:19:41 PM »
When negotiating for money, is it best to send in a letter or is an e-mail okay? 

Also, who have you addressed it to?  Dean of Admissions?  Of Financial Aid?

ScurvyWench

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #74 on: April 06, 2005, 06:27:49 PM »
Okie Dokie. More money just came my way. $8,000 from Pepperdine. I don't know if my letter had anything to do with it since it was for the diversity scholarship. All I know is that I now have a scholarship. Which is cool.

When negotiating for money, is it best to send in a letter or is an e-mail okay?

Also, who have you addressed it to? Dean of Admissions? Of Financial Aid?

I personally feel that a hard copy letter is more professional. Others disagree. In addition, with the time crunch, there's really no time for regular mail--you'll have to use email. Some people have been using email and had positive response.

Painting101

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #75 on: April 06, 2005, 07:47:18 PM »
Email is just fine given the time constraint.  It worked for me.  As far as the addressee, you could probably just email admissions@school.edu, or finaid@school.edu, if you get my drift.
Pitt is it!

limonjello

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #76 on: April 06, 2005, 10:52:05 PM »
Email is just fine given the time constraint.  It worked for me.  As far as the addressee, you could probably just email admissions@school.edu, or finaid@school.edu, if you get my drift.

Phone is always faster and better than e-mail.  Period.  End of story.  Yes, I am sure e-mail "worked", but you don't know how much you would have received had you made a call as well, do you?  The world is still a high-contact environment.

This won't go over well, but come on, we are talking about thousands of dollars and you think you will do just as well by e-mail?  I'd like a lawyer who is willing to put in at least a phone call on my behalf if thousands of dollars are on the line.  If they don't do it for themselves, why the hell will they do it for me?  ::)

Harust

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #77 on: April 07, 2005, 12:22:45 AM »
I originally sent in an email requesting reconsideration on my scholarship amount and it went unanswered for about two weeks.  I finally decided to call since deposit deadlines were getting closer, and good thing I did because the admissions people never received it.  She told me she thought my story sounded familiar but she couldn't remember if she had read my email.  She had me resend it directly to her.  I think it's best to call because then you at least get the peace of mind knowing someone out there knows about your request and has had the chance to talk to you.  In retrospect, I would have called first instead of emailing.

In the end it worked out great for me, I got an initial increase of half the original amount (so another 5k on top of the original 10k) and then just an hour ago I got an email from the person I have been in contact with and found out I got double the amount renewable all three years (20k/year).  I'm so glad I called because I think that really helped.

Good luck to everyone, just keep in mind that a lot of these schools want to help you go there, they accepted you for a reason. 

Krishna

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #78 on: April 08, 2005, 03:14:15 AM »
This is by far the most helpful thread I have read here. Very heartening to read about those of you who have parlayed an earnest desire to go to a school into them offered you cash money prizes to go there. Thanks very much to OP (Cringe) for bringing it up -- I had no idea this could be done! What do you all think of the option of doing it "live", so to speak?

Let me explain.

I have been accepted to both Chicago-Kent ($10k Merit Scholarship, maintain 3.25 to keep, and $5k First-Year Grant), and DePaul ($12k Dean's Scholarship, maintain 3.3 to keep), and I think I should perhaps try to negotiate, based on what I am reading here (they are both in the same city, one is slightly higher-ranked, but not by a huge amount, etc.).

I have not received any Aid info from either school (which really freaks me out) -- I plan on going PI, and I don't want to spend fifteen (or more!!) years in debt...

I will be visiting them both next week (Tuesday and Wednesday) -- would it be better to simply meet with the Dean while there and ask them in person? Should I send an e-mail first, or call 1st? Or should I just e-mail or call?

Thanks in advance for any advice,
-K

B.A. from UC Berkeley
Work as a Teacher
GPA: 3.27
LSAT: 162
Acceptances: DePaul($), Chicago-Kent($), Northeastern ($), Lewis & Clark, Albany
Rejections: none
Haven't Heard: CUNY, Cardozo, Brooklyn, New York.

towanda03

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #79 on: April 08, 2005, 12:42:29 PM »
I have been accepted to both Chicago-Kent ($10k Merit Scholarship, maintain 3.25 to keep, and $5k First-Year Grant), and DePaul ($12k Dean's Scholarship, maintain 3.3 to keep), and I think I should perhaps try to negotiate, based on what I am reading here (they are both in the same city, one is slightly higher-ranked, but not by a huge amount, etc.).

I have not received any Aid info from either school (which really freaks me out) -- I plan on going PI, and I don't want to spend fifteen (or more!!) years in debt...

I will be visiting them both next week (Tuesday and Wednesday) -- would it be better to simply meet with the Dean while there and ask them in person? Should I send an e-mail first, or call 1st? Or should I just e-mail or call?

Thanks in advance for any advice,
-K



If you have an opportunity to meet with someone in person, then by all means do that.  You might want to e-mail outlining your arguments before hand (I don't think there's much to be gained from the element of surprise here). 

Be careful, though, of playing the PI card.  All the admissions specialists say that unless you have a work history that really backs you up, most law schools are skeptical of the sustainability of the this ambition.

Good luck.