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Author Topic: Negotiating with schools for $  (Read 63921 times)

Astro

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #310 on: April 13, 2007, 08:36:42 PM »
Me.  They gave me $10 MILLION.













































Har.  Sorry.  No.
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all. 

Astro

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #311 on: May 05, 2007, 02:32:17 AM »
So here's a success story for those of you still anxiously scrambling for a few dollars from your remaining choices.


I'm a foreign student.  As such, I not only have to pay the highest amount of tuition at all schools, I also don't qualify for low-interest government loans.  Scholarships were not just desirable -- they were NECESSARY if I wanted to attend law school in the United States.

My numbers aren't special.  I had a bit of an LSAT disaster -- while it was an alright score, it was disappointingly low for what I had practiced and expected (even after realistically adjusting my score for the pressures of writing the exam).  My GPA was middle-of-the-road type stuff.


I applied only to schools in NorCal.  I figured my best shot was to attend a T2 with a decent scholarship.  I needed at least $15,000 a year to be able to afford one of these schools.

My first offer was from Pacific McGeorge, for $15K renewable annually if I finished in the top third of the class.  After a nervous wait, I got an offer from the University of San Francisco for $16.5K, but only for the first year.  Finally, after a long wait, Santa Clara University sent word that they were offering me the Emery Merit Scholarship for $14K a year, conditional on me staying in the top 25% of my class.

These were great offers, but I'm confined to a certain area of the East Bay for personal reasons.  Pacific McGeorge was out -- it would be impossible for me to commute to Sacramento.  Santa Clara was doable, but I would have to purchase a car, and these costs, added to the stress of the commute itself (minimum hour there and hour back on busy freeways) made it an undesirable prospect.  Frankly, USF had always been my top choice amongst the three: it was similarly ranked, but its position within the city itself made it an easy commute, it had clinics suited to my interests, and, quite frankly, I liked the campus.  I was rooting for it.


I called USF after receiving the original scholarship offer to let them know that I was really interested in attending the school.  I talked to the Director of Admissions.  While it was a bit awkward, I felt like having this direct connection could only be beneficial.

After I received word from Santa Clara about the Emery, I wrote a long, detailed letter to USF expressing my continued interest in the school.  I pointed out that the Bay Area was desirable for me for a lot of personal reasons.  I then explained why USF was exactly suited to my needs, and why it was a better choice than either Santa Clara or Pacific McGeorge (its direct competition in the region).  I meshed my personal statement and diversity statement with the clinics and programs offered by USF, and detailed how and why the school was a perfect fit.  I made sure to remind them that the only thing standing between me and attendance at USF was my financial dilemma.  I then made it very clear that if the other two schools' offers could be matched, there was no doubt whatsoever that I would be attending USF.


I called a few hours after sending the email (yes, email, instead of a letter, but I already had an established email rapport with the Director of Admissions -- I recommend both mailing AND emailing if this is not the case) and talked to the DoA.  He told me that there was nothing they could promise me, and that I would have to wait for a week or two past the first deposit deadline to find out if the cash was available for me to attend. 

So I waited.  Very anxiously, I might add.  In the meantime, I paid my Santa Clara deposit (my USF deposit deadline was extended for reasons other than those I've detailed).  I made peace with going to Santa Clara.  In some ways, I even started looking forward to it.

Last week, I visited the Bay Area.  I made sure to swing by and personally talk to the DoA at USF.  He was an extremely friendly guy, and I was relieved after I talked to him.  He still wasn't committing to anything, but he told me just to stay patient and that news would be on its way shortly. 


This afternoon, I finally got word from USF.  They are offering me the Dean's Scholarship, worth $24,000 a year.  It basically bears the same stipulations as the Emery Award at Santa Clara, which makes it not just a good deal, but a great deal.  I am absolutely ecstatic. 



Why am I telling this story?  Well, first of all, others' stories in this thread gave me hope when I thought things were never going to get better.  Second, I hope people take note of some key points:


1.  Make a personal connection with someone.  The higher up they are in that office, the better.
2.  Don't just email.  Call.  If you can, visit.  Even if it seems pointless, people are always willing to go to bat for someone they've met and liked (I'm pretty sure this is what happened to me -- he was a member of the committee that awarded me the scholarship).
3.  Don't think that your numbers define you.  They're extremely important, but your presentation to the school is also important.  That letter of continued interest was the deal breaker for me.  I slaved over it and had some expert help in editing it.  I made it extremely clear why I was perfect for USF, and why USF was perfect for me.
4.  Be sincere.  It's also okay to be a little vulnerable, if you think it's appropriate.  I mentioned that my SO is in the area and that this is extremely important to me.  It helps sell the school on the personal touch -- makes them a part of you, rather than just another choice.
5.  Research the school.  Then, match it to yourself.  See exactly where you're going to be a vibrant addition to their program.  Also see where they interest you.  This goes hand-in-hand with #3.
6.  Keep hoping.  And, as you hope, keep bugging them.  I don't mean become a huge pest.  I mean a friendly email or call every 10 days or so.  Don't look desperate, but look interested.
7.  Make peace with your other options.  It makes the victory that much sweeter when it comes.


Hope this helps a few of you.  Maybe this won't be useful until next cycle.  Who knows?  All I know is, I'm going to law school in San Francisco, baby!
 
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all. 

whoneedsanABA

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #312 on: May 05, 2007, 04:54:25 PM »
great read man...and even better advice.  congrats on the scholarship...

i just negotiated a 20k renewable scholarship with USD (they previously offered a one time grant)...which makes my decision a hell of alot harder.



1.  Make a personal connection with someone.  The higher up they are in that office, the better.
2.  Don't just email.  Call.  If you can, visit.  Even if it seems pointless, people are always willing to go to bat for someone they've met and liked (I'm pretty sure this is what happened to me -- he was a member of the committee that awarded me the scholarship).
3.  Don't think that your numbers define you.  They're extremely important, but your presentation to the school is also important.  That letter of continued interest was the deal breaker for me.  I slaved over it and had some expert help in editing it.  I made it extremely clear why I was perfect for USF, and why USF was perfect for me.
4.  Be sincere.  It's also okay to be a little vulnerable, if you think it's appropriate.  I mentioned that my SO is in the area and that this is extremely important to me.  It helps sell the school on the personal touch -- makes them a part of you, rather than just another choice.
5.  Research the school.  Then, match it to yourself.  See exactly where you're going to be a vibrant addition to their program.  Also see where they interest you.  This goes hand-in-hand with #3.
6.  Keep hoping.  And, as you hope, keep bugging them.  I don't mean become a huge pest.  I mean a friendly email or call every 10 days or so.  Don't look desperate, but look interested.
7.  Make peace with your other options.  It makes the victory that much sweeter when it comes.


Hope this helps a few of you.  Maybe this won't be useful until next cycle.  Who knows?  All I know is, I'm going to law school in San Francisco, baby!
 
it may come down to fordham v. hastings...

sladkaya

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #313 on: May 05, 2007, 05:25:03 PM »
Congrats J!!!  As a fellow screwed-by-no-US-cosingner foreigner, I'm glad things worked out for you!
Accepted: Michigan($$), Northwestern($$$), Vanderbilt($$$), UCLA($$), UT($$$), WUSTL($$$), UIUC($$$$), Notre Dame($$),

Attending: TEXAS !!!

http://www.lawschoolnumbers.com/display.php?user=sladkaya

Astro

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #314 on: May 05, 2007, 05:32:20 PM »
Congrats J!!!  As a fellow screwed-by-no-US-cosingner foreigner, I'm glad things worked out for you!


 :D

If only my school had half the pull of any one of your amazing choices...   :D


Have you figured out where you're going yet?

ETA:  I think Northwestern is an outstanding choice for you, particularly with that sort of scholarship.  I say do it. 
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all. 

Roman815

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #315 on: May 05, 2007, 05:39:03 PM »
great read man...and even better advice.  congrats on the scholarship...

i just negotiated a 20k renewable scholarship with USD (they previously offered a one time grant)...which makes my decision a hell of alot harder.

How did you get them to raise it? I just received a 16K one time scholarship also but I'm at the bottom of their class for the day division. I don't know why I received this scholarship but I'm up for raising it if I can. I did send them an e-mail asking if they would match my McGeorge offer but I never got a response. I wonder if they just never read it and gave me a scholarship randomly. Anyways, tell me your secret. I assume it was your numbers since you were able to get into Fordham and Hastings.
University of San Diego School of Law Class of 2010!

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Astro

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #316 on: May 05, 2007, 05:53:56 PM »
great read man...and even better advice.  congrats on the scholarship...

i just negotiated a 20k renewable scholarship with USD (they previously offered a one time grant)...which makes my decision a hell of alot harder.

How did you get them to raise it? I just received a 16K one time scholarship also but I'm at the bottom of their class for the day division. I don't know why I received this scholarship but I'm up for raising it if I can. I did send them an e-mail asking if they would match my McGeorge offer but I never got a response. I wonder if they just never read it and gave me a scholarship randomly. Anyways, tell me your secret. I assume it was your numbers since you were able to get into Fordham and Hastings.


Don't bother trying.  You won't get it.
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all. 

whoneedsanABA

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #317 on: May 05, 2007, 09:39:47 PM »
TITCR.  use your other scholarships for leverage.


[/quote]

Haha...I'm assuming the last post was joke.

I haven't been following this thread, but I think the general formula is "I really want to come to your school, (if it's your top choice say so) but the only thing holding me back is financial considerations.  I have received $X from School X.  If you could match this offer, this would be the deciding factor in my decision to come to your school."  I prefer email as opposed to calling, but you should try to email the highest person in the admissions office, or whoever you can get the email of, as opposed to the general admissions office email.

But anyway, always ask, even if you think there's a very slim chance they'll match.  I tried negotiating with 5 schools, it worked with 4.  If they accepted you, they want you to come there, and there's usually a good chance they'll give you more money if you tell them that more money will allow you to come there.
[/quote]
it may come down to fordham v. hastings...

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #318 on: May 05, 2007, 10:58:35 PM »
great read man...and even better advice.  congrats on the scholarship...

i just negotiated a 20k renewable scholarship with USD (they previously offered a one time grant)...which makes my decision a hell of alot harder.

How did you get them to raise it? I just received a 16K one time scholarship also but I'm at the bottom of their class for the day division. I don't know why I received this scholarship but I'm up for raising it if I can. I did send them an e-mail asking if they would match my McGeorge offer but I never got a response. I wonder if they just never read it and gave me a scholarship randomly. Anyways, tell me your secret. I assume it was your numbers since you were able to get into Fordham and Hastings.

My initial attempt at money was quite successful using another scholarship as leverage.  I went from none to a GPA dependent renewable scholarship.  However, my second attempt at an increase to match that of the higher ranked school with a still higher scholarship was turned down.  I've never seen someone on LSN with your or my numbers get more than 16k a year.
USD 2010

Roman815

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Re: Negotiating with schools for $
« Reply #319 on: May 05, 2007, 11:32:00 PM »
great read man...and even better advice.  congrats on the scholarship...

i just negotiated a 20k renewable scholarship with USD (they previously offered a one time grant)...which makes my decision a hell of alot harder.

How did you get them to raise it? I just received a 16K one time scholarship also but I'm at the bottom of their class for the day division. I don't know why I received this scholarship but I'm up for raising it if I can. I did send them an e-mail asking if they would match my McGeorge offer but I never got a response. I wonder if they just never read it and gave me a scholarship randomly. Anyways, tell me your secret. I assume it was your numbers since you were able to get into Fordham and Hastings.

My initial attempt at money was quite successful using another scholarship as leverage.  I went from none to a GPA dependent renewable scholarship.  However, my second attempt at an increase to match that of the higher ranked school with a still higher scholarship was turned down.  I've never seen someone on LSN with your or my numbers get more than 16k a year.

The thing is that I already had an initial attempt. I e-mailed, called, and visited but USD never responded until now. I'm lucky enough to get this one year scholarship so I'll just stop now. I'm just not sure if they extended this offer due to my attempts to get funding or because they just liked my application. I wonder how they choose who to give scholarships to because there are plenty of people that are going to USD with higher numbers than mine that did not get any funding. This is just another way in which USD has made me feel special.  :D
University of San Diego School of Law Class of 2010!

LSN