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Author Topic: Canadian Law Schools  (Read 9704 times)

hburn

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Canadian Law Schools
« on: April 08, 2002, 11:17:15 AM »
Does anyone know how Canadian law schools are ranked with respect to American law schools.  I'm considering Dalhousie University law school and I'm curious to see how a degree from there would be respected in the United States, especially in New England.

scott

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Re: Canadian Law Schools
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2002, 02:47:53 AM »
Hmmm, reply's a little late.  I'm a canadian going to a Canadian law school.  Although I have a biased perspective, Canadian law schools on the whole are pretty good -- although we don't really have 1st, 2nd, 3rd tier distinctions.  I would argue that the University of Toronto would stand up to any law school in the US (in terms of quality of education).  In terms of profile in the US, of course canadian law degrees do not enjoy as high a standing as comparable US law schools.  That being said, many of the top New York law firms actively recruit at some of the higher-profile eastern Canadian law schools such as Toronto, McGill (Montreal) and Osgoode Hall (Toronto).

Dalhousie's a great school with great history, but it doesn't enjoy as high a reputation as it used to.  In terms of reputation in Canada, the top schools are: Toronto (definitely the highest), McGill, Osgoode Hall and Victoria.

HOpe this helps.

chrisuofc

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Re: Canadian Law Schools
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2003, 05:24:13 PM »
Do you need to earn a JD degree to be recruited by a US firm?

Jeff

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Re: Canadian Law Schools
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2003, 04:23:39 AM »
Regarding Scotts message about Canadian law schools. It is generally accepted that the top 4 schools are Victoria, Toronto, McGill and Osgoode. However, the designation of Toronto as "definately the best" is dubious. I'm currently at UofT (MA) and was offered a place, and a merit-scholarship at UofT. After due diligence, I've chosen McGill instead (though I didn't win a scholarship there). McGill is Canada's historic leader, it's curriculum is cutting edge, and by all accounts is the best "International Law School" in Canada.
In strict terms of 'quality of education', Victoria is widely regarded as best, and trumps Osgoode and UofT in that respect. Toronto is premised on the economics model of law. Highest importance is placed on creating a sell-able product (regardless of quality), promoting itself as a "great law school". Indeed it does this promotion very well, but to claim that it is the best law school, would be to play into the "smoke and mirrors" strategy of that school, which, I think is a detriment to the study of law in Canada, and in general.
As for Dalhousie, it tends to fit in the second tier of elite law schools in Canada, along with Queen's, Western and Alberta (plus or minus), which offer a leading education in at least one discipline. As I recall, Dalhousie is a leader in maritime law.

JDD

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JD, LLB, BCL
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2003, 04:40:23 AM »
Only an American school can offer a real "JD" degree which is accepted throughout the United States.

The LLB is accepted in New York and Boston, Mass. So any  Canadian LLB is accepted there. I believe that after a year or so of practicing in the US that one can work in other states (this is the case for California at least).

In Canada, only two schools offer a JD, Windsor (in conjunction with Detroit) and University of Toronto. The Toronto degree is a pseudo-JD as its qualification is tantamount to an LLB, and will NOT qualify you to work in the US (except in NYC and Boston, like all Canadian LLB degrees). The Windsor degree is "real" because it is actually awarded from Detroit, and will qualify you to work anywhere in the USA.

I am not sure about the status of the BCL. I know it is required for work in Quebec. But does a BCL qualify one to practice in continental Europe? In other civil law juristictions?


Arie BD

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Re: Canadian Law Schools
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2003, 11:26:00 AM »
With regards to schools in Canada...does anybody know of a good site for student reviews of specific schools such as UBC and Uvic? My second ??? relates to the success of late application requests to Ontario schools, is it worth applying in Feb wheb the deadline has long passed?

Pun

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Re: Canadian Law Schools
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2003, 04:16:31 AM »
Hi,

I not to sure what "JDD" meant by a "real" JD. If he/she is refering to the title of the degree than yes he/she is correct. Only Windsor offer a JD/LLB program, and as stated at U of T offers the option to offer students a JD. However, the LLB is the accepted designation or nomenclature that is given a Candian law degrees. In the U.S. a law degree is titled a JD; however, I can't recall the excat date but before the 60's some U.S schools offered an LLB instead of the JD. About 34 years ago the ABA recommended that U.S. law schools offer a single unifying professional degree. Hence the title was changed from LLB to JD. If you want to read more regarding the JD/LLB deabte please view this article:

http://www.arc.miami.edu/people/LLB%20to%20JD%20for%20school%20website.pdf

Also, with respect to Canadian Law School Reputation: U of T is consdiered to have the best rep among any law schools. Whether it's granted or not many firms regard them as the best law school in Canada. On a personal note, I have a few friends and family who are lawyers that particpate in the student recruiting process. All of them had stated that U of T is usually where the recruit most of there students. True, it may be possible that my friends and family do not represent every law firm but I don't think the other would differ. I've e-mailed a few law professor at U of Boston and a few other U.S. Ivy League schools and the have also stated U of T to have a strong reputation south of the border. Let's face it it's the Harvard north of the border.

However, I should add that the quality of legal education for any Canadian law school is good. So if your were accepted at any Candian law school you would get a solid legal education; however, it may be a bit more difficult if you did not graduate from U of T. About 10 percent of the graduating class goes on to work in New York. Nonethless if you get accepted into any law school in Canada don't despari there all very good.

CC

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Re: Canadian Law Schools
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2003, 04:22:32 PM »
Can I get some advice regarding Victoria, Western and Queen's? I've been accepted to all of them and I'm not sure which to pick. I'm thinking of specializing in intellectual properties and maybe some corporate law. I also plan on moving to the US in the future so I was told that Queen's was the place but people have also mentioned that Victoria is a really good place. I'm having a hard time deciding. Any suggestions?

Pun

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Re: Canadian Law Schools
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2003, 03:16:08 AM »
I think Vic has a good co-op program. Vic, also has a good rep in terms of quality of education. However, the schools is much smaller than the other two. Nonethless all the schools you mentioned are very good. I suggest to contact the faculty and ask about there interests and you may want to research the schools course offerings. Also, maybe you should consider where you want to article: BC or Ontario. Good Luck!

Pun

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Re: Canadian Law Schools
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2003, 03:17:41 AM »
If you don't mind CC, what are your stats?  I'm also in application season.

Thanks.