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Author Topic: are people accepted with low LSAT scores mostly URMs?  (Read 24411 times)

maricutie

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Re: are people accepted with low LSAT scores mostly URMs?
« Reply #170 on: February 28, 2005, 04:27:44 PM »
Is there any actual data on LSAT breakdown by race?  I'm mostly curious for myself.  But how many of each URM and non-URM category actually score 170+ or 160-170?

So look for the stats in the Mich case. I posted the link somewhere before, but now I'm too lazy. Something like 26 af-ams have an lsat of 165+ and a gpa of 3.5+ ... no info for other groups, though, and one would imagine that this number would have changed in the recent years.

blk_reign

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Re: are people accepted with low LSAT scores mostly URMs?
« Reply #171 on: February 28, 2005, 04:40:55 PM »
Is there any actual data on LSAT breakdown by race?  I'm mostly curious for myself.  But how many of each URM and non-URM category actually score 170+ or 160-170?

don't know but perhaps you can contact the census bureau and ask them to add that to their list of questions..
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

blk_reign

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Re: are people accepted with low LSAT scores mostly URMs?
« Reply #172 on: February 28, 2005, 04:41:45 PM »
Is there any actual data on LSAT breakdown by race?  I'm mostly curious for myself.  But how many of each URM and non-URM category actually score 170+ or 160-170?

So look for the stats in the Mich case. I posted the link somewhere before, but now I'm too lazy. Something like 26 af-ams have an lsat of 165+ and a gpa of 3.5+ ... no info for other groups, though, and one would imagine that this number would have changed in the recent years.

Isn't it interesting that NO other minority groups have info available?
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

WoeIsMe

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Re: are people accepted with low LSAT scores mostly URMs?
« Reply #173 on: February 28, 2005, 04:53:24 PM »

Isn't it interesting that NO other minority groups have info available?


not really.. here you go

http://www.ceousa.org/pdfs/VALaw.pdf


whatfoster

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Re: are people accepted with low LSAT scores mostly URMs?
« Reply #174 on: February 28, 2005, 05:04:52 PM »
that was some clutch clipart ;-).
let's hope that this isn't a dead horse, because the correlation between ethnicity and performance on standardized exams, in ugrad, and in the application process leads to several uncomfortable propositions.  statistical and/or ethical debates notwithstanding, law schools are currently either justified or not justified in judging people of different ethnicity by different standards; if they are--which i happen to believe, in the lack of equality of opportunity--the question as to why they are should not be taboo,  nor should the question of how the problem--institutional disadvantages for most non-asian minorities and non-traditional or low-SES students, etc--is approached be considered a dead issue.
granted, too many threads are dedicated to what generally becomes flamebait, but i find it interesting to talk to a population whom AA actually affects.
if you want me to can it, write penn a letter telling them how wonderful i am so they'll accept me and i can run circles around my house and cheer at the top of my lungs ;-).
YT
...

maricutie

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Re: are people accepted with low LSAT scores mostly URMs?
« Reply #175 on: February 28, 2005, 05:32:22 PM »
not really.. here you go

http://www.ceousa.org/pdfs/VALaw.pdf

Wait a second ... is this telling me that at UVa Blacks and Asians have a better shot at admission than whites and/or hispanics? So it really is plausible to suggest some form of AA for asians ...

Interesting.

inla

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Re: are people accepted with low LSAT scores mostly URMs?
« Reply #176 on: February 28, 2005, 06:05:54 PM »
not really.. here you go

http://www.ceousa.org/pdfs/VALaw.pdf

Wait a second ... is this telling me that at UVa Blacks and Asians have a better shot at admission than whites and/or hispanics? So it really is plausible to suggest some form of AA for asians ...

Interesting.


This is from the Asian American Legal Defense Fund Website:


AALDEF Applauds Affirmative Action Decision

New York, NY — The Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), a New York-based civil rights organization, praised the United States Supreme Court decision on June 23rd in Grutter v. Bollinger, which upheld the race-conscious affirmative action policy of Michigan Law School. (read the decision)

"This decision is a great victory for civil rights," said AALDEF Executive Director Margaret Fung. "Although the Court rejected the particular program adopted by the University of Michigan in Gratz v. Bollinger, it recognized that affirmative action is an important tool to promote equal opportunity and racial diversity in higher education."

"One misconception about affirmative action is that Asians and South Asians are not under-represented in academic institutions, do not face discrimination and have no need for programs that take into account a wide range of factors that circumscribe opportunity," said Chandra Bhatnagar, AALDEF staff attorney and Director of the South Asian Workersą Project for Human Rights. He cited a recent national survey which found that 13% of Asian/South Asian females, 4.5 times the rate for white females, completed only an 8th grade education or less. In fact, Asians are underrepresented in numerous fields, such as history (2.2%), sociology (2.2%), English/literature (2.1%), philosophy (1.8%), education (1.6%), psychology (1.4%), political science (1.3%), and law (0.9%).

In addition, affirmative action programs greatly assist many Asian and South Asian families struggling to overcome discrimination. Immigrants and refugees from Southeast Asia have the lowest educational achievement levels of any immigrant group — two out of three Cambodian, Hmong and Laotian Americans do not complete high school.

Justice O'Connor, writing for a 5-4 majority in the Grutter case, affirmed that race was properly considered as one of many factors in the admissions process: "Student body diversity is a compelling state interest that can justify the use of race in university admissions." She continued, "In order to cultivate a set of leaders with legitimacy in the eyes of the citizenry, it is necessary that the path to leadership be visibly open to talented and qualified individuals of every race and ethnicity."

"Affirmative action not only benefits Asian Americans and other communities of color that have faced past discrimination — it benefits all Americans," said AALDEF executive director Fung. "The Court has reaffirmed our nation's commitment to securing diversity in higher education."


http://www.aaldef.org/press.html