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Author Topic: Best law schools in the South?  (Read 24902 times)

Dante Hicks

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2004, 09:58:17 AM »
Does anyone have an opinion on Cumberland (Samford)?  Why does anyone suppose that Cumberland is ranked as a Tier 3 school?  It seems to be a great school.  How does it compare with UA?  Any info on this would be appreciated.

RF  ???
One day it was so cold in Chicago that the lawyers had their hands in their own pockets.

planejane

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2004, 08:38:01 AM »
Hey Dante,

Faulkner University's legal assistant/paralegal program just got approved yesterday by the ABA.  I was hoping their law school could get off their *** and get ABA approved as well.  I live in Montgomery and their is no ABA approved law school down here.  If they don't get approved within the next year, I am going back home to Georgia for law school.  If they ever get approved, Faulkner would be another option for you.  Faulkner is still an option even if they are not ABA approved.

Dante Hicks

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2004, 10:54:01 AM »
Thanks for the reply planejane.  Montgomery would simply just be way too far for me.  I live close to Huntsville and am now looking at anything in Birmingham (only an hour an 15-20 minute drive away).  It's bad enough I have to be away from my family when I'll be in law school.

I've gone over the courses Cumberland offers and it seems just as good as any other Alabama law schools (or even nationally).  Not sure of their 3rd tier ranking.  Even their admissions requirements/standards seem to be the same.

RF (Dante Hicks not my real name of course)
One day it was so cold in Chicago that the lawyers had their hands in their own pockets.

getmein

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2004, 10:30:16 PM »
Sorry to say but you are asking the wrong people--prelaw students aren't the authority on quality of law schools. My experience has been that it is all hearsay. Ask some lawyers working in the field or some 2L 3L law students, they might have more perspective.

ichiban

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #14 on: March 07, 2004, 02:35:31 PM »
Hold up, do some of you actually consider UVA, Washington and Lee, William and Mary, all of which are in the Virginia area to be in the SOUTH???

Technically, they are in the Mid-Atlantic, and from what I hear, more grads go to the Northeast for jobs than to the South.  So whoever made that comment, I'm not trying to attack, I'm just asking for you to clarify.  (It's because I have a vested interest in this, with my getting into Virginia schools.)

apartment

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2004, 03:56:59 PM »
I didn't make that comment but I think the poster meant the "South" as everyone north of Maryland thinks of it.  When I was growing up in the Northeast, Virgina was considered very much a part of "the South," cotton, tidewater mansions, the whole bit.  Of course, that's because the litmus test was "was it a slave state?"  Don't think that really applies anymore.

Course, now I live in DC, so I think of Northern Virginia as, well, Northern Virginia, and the rest of Virginia as the South.  I understand that it is considered "less southern" by some folks, but I love the South and don't think there is anything to be ashamed of being lumped in with that region.  I noticed some weird views on that in North Carolina too.  I've heard people say that it's not very southern either.  I can only guess then that it's more lifestyle and attitude than actual geography that people use to classify a state as part of "the South."


Dante Hicks

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2004, 08:35:36 PM »
The South consists of :

The Carolinas, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, Florida, and Tennessee.

However, any state that was part of the confederacy has also been referred to as a "Southern" state.

You could also go by the Mason-Dixon line too.

Go to states such as Arkansas, Kentucky, and Indiana and you could swear you were in the South.

Pick one.
One day it was so cold in Chicago that the lawyers had their hands in their own pockets.

pashukanis

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2004, 01:10:50 PM »
I am not an existing or potential law student, but attended law school and have hired from schools in the South for an AmLaw 100 law firm in D.C. and Atlanta.  I also know a little something about the law schools in this region, as I have taught as an adjunct at three of them.

A lot depends on whether you are looking for the national leaders in the South or for the strong regional schools.  (If you are looking for a strong state school, just save yourself the angst and pick the flagship in that state.  If you graduate at the top of your class at the state school, you will will your pick of firms within that state.) 

Assuming that you are looking for national leaders, excluding Virginia they are Vanderbilt and Duke.

UNC is a very good deal, with a great student body.  Probably the best value in the South, when you couple quality and cost.

In my opinion, Emory and Tulane and Wake are strong, but they are more regional schools than Duke, Vanderbilt and UNC.  And they are expensive.  I am more impressed with Emory graduates than the other two.

Beyond UNC, there are some very strong public schools in the South:

In Florida:  Florida State University and Florida.  Cheap tuition, if you can get in-state.  Florida is the traditional established leader, but FSU seems to be on the rise if you look at things like faculty hiring, bar passage, placement etc.  Miami is very good but no better than FSU or Florida; unless you have a reason to be in Miami (!) the expense probably doesn't justify it since FSU and Florida equal or exceed Miami on quality and are much cheaper on the cost dimension.

In Georgia:  UGa and Emory (if you can afford it).  Based on faculty hiring Emory seems to be on the rise, but UGa just snagged Peter Spiro from Hofstra and is strong in international.  UGa's reasonable tuition places it just slightly behind UNC for a public law schools in the South (excluding Virginia).

In Alabama:  Alabama is strong.

I know that there are others -- Tennessee, Mississippi, Cumberland, Georgia State, Stetson, Mercer, South Carolina, etc.  In my opinion, though, these are only good choices as law schools if you plan to be in that state or an adjacent state.  They have little reputation nationally or in D.C. or Atlanta.


bill bradsky

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2004, 01:26:18 PM »
Geogia State (downtown Atlanta) and Mercer (an hour away) don't have strong reputations in Atlanta?

pashukanis

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Re: Best law schools in the South?
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2004, 05:26:17 PM »
Within the state of Georgia, yes - IF you are at the top of the class at one of those schools.  Beyond that, no -- compared to UGa and Emory, and the other schools I mentioned, these are not strong law schools and will not provide the same consistency in experience, network, or market signal with the large firms, if that's what matters to you.  (They are, however, solid in-state schools if you know you want to be in Georgia and cannot get into one of the others.)  Mercer generally has inconsistent quality in its student body and, while Georgia State is stronger in student quality, its strong student numbers are misleading because it is a night school and thus is not as consistent in what it exposes its students to (e.g., b/c of its night program it is rare for a top student at Georgia State to be on law review, but it is just as rare for a top student at Emory not to be on law review).  Put simply, in comparison to to UNC, Emory, Georgia, Florida, etc., outside of the very top of the class Mercer and Georgia State have a bit of a taint in the Atlanta legal establishment.