Law School Discussion

do schools care about political affiliation?

eileen2004

Re: do schools care about political affiliation?
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2005, 09:17:13 AM »
I can't believe anyone could possibly make some of the comments that have been made on this discussion board.  Wishing misfortune on someone simply because of their political beliefs... reminds me of those who cheered when kennedy was assasinated.  You should be ashamed of yourselves.

I agree. There is no excuse to attack someone becasue of there political beleifs.  It is important to note that the first posts made were by lefties and provided help to the OP without attacking.

I agree entirely.  Honestly, if given a choice between a conservative who's thought out their arguments and a knee-jerk liberal who can't explain concisely why they believe what they profess to believe, I'd pick the conservative every time.  No question.  My preference is to be around people who are intelligent and think for themselves, not necessarily the ones who agree with me on most issues. 

Re: do schools care about political affiliation?
« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2005, 01:02:10 PM »
OP, prelaw advisors can suck.  You've done remarkable things (maybe things I don't support, but they are remarkable  ;))  In the end, I think law school adcomms have respect for people who take stands and act on them, regardless of their particular orientation.  This shows that you are likely to be an active member of campus life and society, something that all schools seek.  You should definitely take pride in your political activism and tell law schools about it.

Re: do schools care about political affiliation?
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2005, 11:18:16 AM »
I think the liberal dominance of higher education is already past its peak. It's still going on, and most professors still (consciously or subconsciously) expect their colleagues and even students to be fellow liberals, but enough people are worried about the situation that a critical mass has been reached. There was a fantastic article in the Chronicle of Higher Education a month or two ago about how the liberal bias perpetuates itself and harms even liberals by locking out opposing views and losing touch with reality. And now we're starting to see things like the President of Brown University attacking the lack of intellectual diversity on campus.

Students like us (I'm a libertarian) are actually kind of lucky, as I see it. We get to be in the forefront of bringing intellectual diversity to campuses that have marginalized people like us for decades. I'm excited about it.

You should definitely tell those schools about your political experiences. At one or two liberal schools, it might even turn out to be a plus that you're a conservative.

jaburk3

Re: do schools care about political affiliation?
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2005, 01:06:35 PM »
I had the same concerns. I started the pro-life group on my campus, have worked in a lot of political campaigns and offices, worked for the U.S. Senate Republican Whip this summer. But I put them on my resumes. I did leave off College Republicans though, and didn't explicitly state the political affiliation on anything I did. For instance, I put something like "have worked on campaigns for the U.S. Presidency, U.S. Senate, etc.". By the way, I am applying for a white house internship for this summer. Any advice?

giffy

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Re: do schools care about political affiliation?
« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2005, 01:20:11 PM »
I had the same concerns. I started the pro-life group on my campus, have worked in a lot of political campaigns and offices, worked for the U.S. Senate Republican Whip this summer. But I put them on my resumes. I did leave off College Republicans though, and didn't explicitly state the political affiliation on anything I did. For instance, I put something like "have worked on campaigns for the U.S. Presidency, U.S. Senate, etc.". By the way, I am applying for a white house internship for this summer. Any advice?

Watch out for invitations to small rooms off of the oval office, and make sure to hunt vigorously for Lincoln's gold.