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Author Topic: Everyday is Black History Month  (Read 4867 times)

MsJay9

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Re: Everyday is Black History Month
« Reply #30 on: February 08, 2005, 10:07:42 AM »

Zora Neale Hurston

On January 7, 1891, Zora Neale Hurston was born in the tiny town of Notasulga, Alabama. She was the fifth of eight children in the Hurston household. Her father John was a carpenter, sharecropper, and a Baptist preacher; and her mother Lucy, a former schoolteacher. Within a year of Zora's birth, the family moved to Eatonville, Florida; a town, which held historical significance as the first, incorporated Black municipality in the United States.

In 1904, thirteen-year-old Zora was devastated by the death of her mother. Later that same year, her unaffectionate father removed her from school and sent her to care for her brother's children. A rambunctious and restless teenager, Zora was eager to leave the responsibility of that household. She became a member of a traveling theater at the age of sixteen, and subsequently began domestic work for a white household. It was in this home that Hurston's intellectual spark was discovered. The woman for whom Zora worked, bought Zora her first book and arranged for her to attend high school at Morgan Academy (now known as Morgan State University) in Baltimore from which she graduated in June of 1918.

The following summer, Zora held jobs as a waitress and a manicurist. She then enrolled in Howard Prep School, followed by a distracted jaunt at Howard University. Although she spent nearly four years at the esteemed institution, she graduated with only a two-year Associates degree. It was during this time at Howard, that Hurston published her first stories. Starting in a college publication, then branching out into writing contests in newspapers and magazines, the early 1920's marked the beginning of Zora Neale Hurston's career as an author.

In 1925, Hurston headed to New York, just as the Harlem Renaissance was at its crest. She enrolled in Barnard College to study under Franz Boas, the father of anthropology. While there, Hurston married an old Howard boyfriend named Herbert Sheen, but the marriage was short-lived. After graduation, Zora returned to her hometown of Eatonville to collect folklore as material for her blossoming writing career. The late 1920's marked a resurgence of her literary muse as Hurston published several works, and consequently gained financial sponsorship from wealthy New York patrons.

The 1930's and early 1940's marked the peak of Hurston's literary career. It was during this time that she completed graduate work at Columbia, published four novels and an autobiography, and was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her writing brought her to the Caribbean where she became so intrigued by the practice of voodoo that she began incorporating these supernatural elements into her novels and stories. Although her work was receiving increasing acclaim from the white literati of New York, Zora often felt under attack from many members of the Black Arts Movement. She termed these detractors, members of the "niggerati", for being close-minded in their criticism of her racial politics.

By the mid-1940s Hurston's writing career was faltering. At one point she was arrested and charged with molesting a ten-year-old boy. Although later acquitted, the scars to her image remained permanent. Hurston was sinking into a depression as she witnessed publishers rejecting one after another of her submitted works.

Around 1950 Hurston returned to Florida, where she worked as a cleaning. After leaving this job, she made one last attempt to revive her writing career, and failed. After a slew of unsuccessful career changes (including newspaper journalist, librarian, and substitute teacher), Hurston became a broken, penniless recluse. She suffered a fatal stroke in 1959 and was buried at unmarked grave in Fort Pierce, Florida.

If you always do what you always did then you'll always get what you always got!

blk_reign

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Re: Everyday is Black History Month
« Reply #31 on: February 08, 2005, 11:16:27 AM »


Lewis Howard Latimer was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts on September 4, 1848. He learned mechanical drawing in the patent attorney office of Crosby and Gould, Boston, Massachusetts. He invented a toilet system for railroad cars in 1873, referred to as water closet for railroad cars. He also invented an electric lamp with an inexpensive carbon filament and a threaded wooden socket for light bulbs. He supervised the installation of carbon filament electric lighting in New York City, Philadelphia, Montreal, and London. He was responsible for preparing the mechanical drawings for Alexander Graham Bell s patent application for his telephone design. Lewis Latimer had the distinction of being the only African American member of the Edison Pioneers, a member of Thomas Edison s engineering division of the Edison Company. He joined the Edison Electric Light Company in 1884 and conducted research on electrical lighting. In 1890 he published Incandescent Electric Lighting, a technical engineering book which became a guide for lighting engineers. For years he served as an expert witness in the court battles over Thomas Edison s patents. At the time of Latimer s death in 1928, the Edison Pioneers attributed his "important inventions" to a "keen perception of the potential of the electric light and kindred industries."

Awards:

    * In 1968, the Lewis H. Latimer Public School in Brooklyn was named for him.

Patents Issued

      Process of manufacturing carbons
      Patent Number 252,386
      Date: Tuesday, January 17, 1882

      Apparatus for cooling and disinfecting
      Patent Number 334,078
      Date: Tuesday, January 12, 1886

      Locking rack for hats, coats, and umbrellas
      Patent Number 557, 076
      Date: Tuesday, March 24, 1896

      Lamp fixture
      Patent Number 968,787
      Date: Tuesday, August 30, 1910 Latimer, Lewis Howard and Brown, Charles W.
      Water closets for railway cars
      Patent Number 147,363
      Date: Tuesday, February 10, 1874

      Latimer, Lewis Howard and Nichols, Joseph V.
      Electric lamp
      Patent Number247,097
      Date: Tuesday, September 13, 1881

      Latimer, Lewis Howard and Tregoning, John
      Globe supporter for electric lamps
      Patent Number 255,212
      Date: Tuesday, March 21, 1882
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

LawBoundGlory

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Ward Connerly, a Hero for all African Americans
« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2005, 04:14:40 PM »
WARD
CONNERLY

Ward Connerly, author of the autobiography, Creating Equal: My Fight Against Race Preferences, is founder and chairman of the American Civil Rights Institute, a national, not-for-profit organization aimed at educating the public about the need to move beyond racial and gender preferences.  Mr. Connerly has gained national attention and respect as an outspoken advocate of equal opportunity for all Americans, regardless of race, sex, or ethnic background.

 As a member of the University of California Board of Regents, Mr. Connerly focused the attention of the nation on the University’s race-based system of preferences in its admissions policy.  On July 20, 1995, following Mr. Connerly’s lead, a majority of the Regents voted to end the University’s use of race as a means for admissions.  He was appointed to a 12-year term as UC Regent in March 1993.

In 1995, Mr. Connerly accepted chairmanship of the California Civil Rights Initiative (Proposition 209) campaign.  He accepted this responsibility in December 1995 when he decided the campaign was in jeopardy.  Under his leadership, the campaign successfully obtained more than 1 million signatures and qualified for the November 1996 ballot.  California voters passed Proposition 209 by a 55 percent to 45 percent margin.

Mr. Connerly’s efforts have led to several honors and awards from supporters around the nation, including the Patrick Henry Award (1995) from The Center for the Study of Popular Culture and Individual Rights Foundation, the National Columbia Award (1996) from the Washington Institute for Public Policy Studies, the Lincoln Award for Leadership (1997) from the Independent Women’s Forum, the Courage in Leadership Award (1997) from Black America’s Political Action Committee, Lt. General Edward J. Bronars Defender of Freedom Award (1997) from the Freedom Alliance, the Spirit of Lincoln Award (1998) from the Log Cabin Republicans, the State Achievement Award (1998) from the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), the Thomas Jefferson Award (1998) from the Council for National Policy, the Ronald Reagan Award (1998) from the California Republican Party, the Racial Harmony Hall of Fame Award (2000) from a Place For Us, the Black Students Association Award from the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga (2001), Individual Freedom Award from the Sovereign Fund (2001), and the George Washington Honor Award from the Freedom Foundation (2002).

Mr. Connerly has been profiled on 60 Minutes, the cover of Parade magazine, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Newsweek magazine, and virtually every major news magazine in America.  He has also appeared on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, Crossfire, Firing Line, Hannity & Colmes, The Crier Report, Meet the Press, Rivera Live, Dateline, Politically Incorrect, NBC Nightly News, CNN, and C-SPAN.

Mr. Connerly is President and Chief Executive Officer of Connerly & Associates, Inc., a Sacramento-based association management and land development consulting firm founded in 1973 by him and his wife, Ilene. He is regarded as one of the housing industry’s top experts, possessing a comprehensive knowledge of housing and development issues.  He has been inducted as a lifetime member into the California Building Industry Hall of Fame.  Mr. Connerly currently is a member of the Rotary Club of Sacramento.

http://www.yaf.org/speakers/ward_connerly.html

One Step Ahead

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Re: Ward Connerly, a Hero for all African Americans
« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2005, 05:59:05 PM »
WARD
CONNERLY

Ward Connerly, author of the autobiography, Creating Equal: My Fight Against Race Preferences, is founder and chairman of the American Civil Rights Institute, a national, not-for-profit organization aimed at educating the public about the need to move beyond racial and gender preferences.  Mr. Connerly has gained national attention and respect as an outspoken advocate of equal opportunity for all Americans, regardless of race, sex, or ethnic background.

 As a member of the University of California Board of Regents, Mr. Connerly focused the attention of the nation on the University’s race-based system of preferences in its admissions policy.  On July 20, 1995, following Mr. Connerly’s lead, a majority of the Regents voted to end the University’s use of race as a means for admissions.  He was appointed to a 12-year term as UC Regent in March 1993.

In 1995, Mr. Connerly accepted chairmanship of the California Civil Rights Initiative (Proposition 209) campaign.  He accepted this responsibility in December 1995 when he decided the campaign was in jeopardy.  Under his leadership, the campaign successfully obtained more than 1 million signatures and qualified for the November 1996 ballot.  California voters passed Proposition 209 by a 55 percent to 45 percent margin.

Mr. Connerly’s efforts have led to several honors and awards from supporters around the nation, including the Patrick Henry Award (1995) from The Center for the Study of Popular Culture and Individual Rights Foundation, the National Columbia Award (1996) from the Washington Institute for Public Policy Studies, the Lincoln Award for Leadership (1997) from the Independent Women’s Forum, the Courage in Leadership Award (1997) from Black America’s Political Action Committee, Lt. General Edward J. Bronars Defender of Freedom Award (1997) from the Freedom Alliance, the Spirit of Lincoln Award (1998) from the Log Cabin Republicans, the State Achievement Award (1998) from the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), the Thomas Jefferson Award (1998) from the Council for National Policy, the Ronald Reagan Award (1998) from the California Republican Party, the Racial Harmony Hall of Fame Award (2000) from a Place For Us, the Black Students Association Award from the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga (2001), Individual Freedom Award from the Sovereign Fund (2001), and the George Washington Honor Award from the Freedom Foundation (2002).

Mr. Connerly has been profiled on 60 Minutes, the cover of Parade magazine, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Newsweek magazine, and virtually every major news magazine in America.  He has also appeared on The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, Crossfire, Firing Line, Hannity & Colmes, The Crier Report, Meet the Press, Rivera Live, Dateline, Politically Incorrect, NBC Nightly News, CNN, and C-SPAN.

Mr. Connerly is President and Chief Executive Officer of Connerly & Associates, Inc., a Sacramento-based association management and land development consulting firm founded in 1973 by him and his wife, Ilene. He is regarded as one of the housing industry’s top experts, possessing a comprehensive knowledge of housing and development issues.  He has been inducted as a lifetime member into the California Building Industry Hall of Fame.  Mr. Connerly currently is a member of the Rotary Club of Sacramento.

http://www.yaf.org/speakers/ward_connerly.html
let me guess, you aren't African-American are you? ::)

blk_reign

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Re: Everyday is Black History Month
« Reply #34 on: February 08, 2005, 06:06:50 PM »


Dr. Patricia Bath, an ophthalmologist from New York, but living in Los Angeles when she received her patent, became the first African American woman doctor to receive a patent for a medical invention. Patricia Bath's patent (no. 4,744,360), a method for removing cataract lenses, transformed eye surgery, using a laser device making the procedure more accurate.

passionate dedication to the treatment and prevention of blindness led her to develop the Cataract Laserphaco Probe. The probe, patented in 1988, is designed to use the power of a laser to quickly and painlessly vaporize cataracts from patients’ eyes, replacing the more common method of using a grinding, drill-like device to remove the afflictions. With another invention, Bath was able to restore sight to people who had been blind for over 30 years. Patricia Bath also holds patents for her invention in Japan, Canada, and Europe.

Patricia Bath graduated from the Howard University School of Medicine in 1968 and completed specialty training in ophthalmology and corneal transplant at both New York University and Columbia University. In 1975, Bath became the first African-American woman surgeon at the UCLA Medical Center and the first woman to be on the faculty of the UCLA Jules Stein Eye Institute. She is the founder and first president of the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness. Patricia Bath was elected to Hunter College Hall of Fame in 1988 and elected as Howard University Pioneer in Academic Medicine in 1993.
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

blk_reign

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Re: Everyday is Black History Month
« Reply #35 on: February 08, 2005, 07:55:22 PM »
Coming to PBS on Feb. 9th and the 16th from 9PM to
>11PM is the four part series Slavery And The Making Of
>America, produced by Dante James, and narrated by
>Morgan Freeman. Dante is an incredible filmmaker who
>has produced many award wining films among them
>biographies on Marian Anderson and A. Philip Randolph. He worked with
>the late great filmmaker Henry Hampton at Blackside and was the
>executive producer of Hampton's last series This Far By Faith: African
>American Spiritual Journeys.
>
>Slavery And The Making Of America tells the story of
>slavery from the point of view of the enslaved. The
>series recognizes the strength, humanity and dignity
>of the enslaved and redefines them as pro-active
>freedom fighters not passive victims.
>
>It is essential to pass this email on to friends and family and
>encourage them to watch. If we can create a large audience for this
>important series PBS will be forced to produce and air more programs
>that address the African-American experience. There are also a web site
>for the series at www.pbs.org/slavery
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

mivida2k

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Re: Everyday is Black History Month
« Reply #36 on: February 09, 2005, 12:33:29 AM »
Mathematician. Born December 5, 1895 in Evansville, Indiana. After graduating from the University of Indiana in 1917, Cox served in World War I and then pursued a career in teaching. In 1925, he earned his Ph.D. in mathematics from Cornell University, becoming the first African American to earn the degree in the United States and, in fact, the world.
After earning his degree, Cox taught at West Virginia State College and then at Howard University, where he remained until his retirement in 1965. Ten years later, the Howard University Mathematics Department established the Elbert F. Cox Scholarship Fund to encourage young Black undergraduates to pursue mathematic studies at the graduate level. Cox died on November 28, 1969, and though he did not live to see his scholarship or the Ph. D. program launched, it is certain that it was he who made it possible.

The president's approval rating has dropped to 33 percent, matching his low in May. His handling of nearly every issue, from the Iraq war to foreign policy, contributed to the president's decline around the nation, even in the Republican-friendly South.

mivida2k

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Re: Ward Connerly, a Hero for all African Americans
« Reply #37 on: February 09, 2005, 12:38:22 AM »
WE, AFRICAN-AMERICANS, DO NOT ACKNOWLEDGE NOR CLAIM WARD CONNERLY.  HE IS AN EMBARRASSMENT TO OUR RACE.  WE ARE INSULTED BY ANY POSTING OF HIM TO BLACK HISTORY MONTH WHEN HE DENIES HIS OWN HERITAGE AND GOES AGAINST EVERYTHING THAT BLACK HISTORY AND OUR ANCESTORS ARE ABOUT AND HAVE WORKED SO HARD TO ACCOMPLISH.
The president's approval rating has dropped to 33 percent, matching his low in May. His handling of nearly every issue, from the Iraq war to foreign policy, contributed to the president's decline around the nation, even in the Republican-friendly South.

LawBoundGlory

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Re: Everyday is Black History Month
« Reply #38 on: February 09, 2005, 12:43:27 AM »
Let me get this straight...you just spoke (in full caps lock) for ALL African Americans. Is this correct?  I would hope, if you are heading for law school, that you would formulate a better argument for why a man with so many credentials and thousands of followers, does not deserve credit for his many accomplishments.  Please respect the fact that MANY African Americans celebrate his work and believe deeply in his passion for law in society.

LawBoundGlory

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Colin Powell, another American Icon and Hero
« Reply #39 on: February 09, 2005, 12:47:09 AM »
Colin L. Powell was nominated by President Bush on December 16, 2000 as Secretary of State. After being unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate, he was sworn in as the 65th Secretary of State on January 20, 2001.

Prior to his appointment, Secretary Powell was the chairman of America’s Promise – The Alliance for Youth, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to mobilizing people from every sector of American life to build the character and competence of young people.

Secretary Powell was a professional soldier for 35 years, during which time he held myriad command and staff positions and rose to the rank of 4-star General. He was Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs from December 1987 to January 1989. His last assignment, from October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1993, was as the 12th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the highest military position in the Department of Defense. During this time, he oversaw 28 crises, including Operation Desert Storm in the victorious 1991 Persian Gulf war.

Following his retirement, Secretary Powell wrote his best-selling autobiography, My American Journey, which was published in 1995. Additionally, he pursued a career as a public speaker, addressing audiences across the country and abroad.

Secretary Powell was born in New York City on April 5, 1937 and was raised in the South Bronx. His parents, Luther and Maud Powell, immigrated to the United States from Jamaica. Secretary Powell was educated in the New York City public schools, graduating from the City College of New York (CCNY), where he earned a bachelor’s degree in geology. He also participated in ROTC at CCNY and received a commission as an Army second lieutenant upon graduation in June 1958. His further academic achievements include a Master of Business Administration degree from George Washington University.

Secretary Powell is the recipient of numerous U.S. and foreign military awards and decorations.

Secretary Powell’s civilian awards include two Presidential Medals of Freedom, the President’s Citizens Medal, the Congressional Gold Medal, the Secretary of State Distinguished Service Medal, and the Secretary of Energy Distinguished Service Medal. Several schools and other institutions have been named in his honor and he holds honorary degrees from universities and colleges across the country.

Secretary Powell is married to the former Alma Vivian Johnson of Birmingham, Alabama. The Powell family includes son Michael; daughters Linda and Anne; daughter-in-law Jane; son-in-law Francis; and grandsons Jeffrey and Bryan.