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Author Topic: Need Some Help  (Read 1345 times)

Ash

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Need Some Help
« on: January 29, 2005, 05:31:27 PM »
Hey all!

Im new to these boards and new to law in general (just graduated highschool) and am interested in learning a bit about law,lsat,admissions etc. Was wondering if any can email me some documents that would be helpful for a newbie, thanks a bunch my email is yarborough2004@gmail.com Thanks again!

JD Haze

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Re: Need Some Help
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2005, 10:47:42 AM »
I think you may be interested in this site-www.allaboutlawschool.com
It's a DVD on the law school "inside scoop". They have a informational trailer on the site
What we think, we become.
--Buddha

up_late

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Re: Need Some Help
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2005, 02:00:59 AM »
Hi.  I'm a first-year law student at one of the top 15 law schools in the US.  So that's where this advice comes from.

Advice for a high school graduate/college freshman:

People come to law school from a wide variety of academic backgrounds, and different academic backgrounds help different people in different ways.  Math and philosophy courses helped me with the LSAT.  Math will probably help me with tax law.  Science courses helped many of my classmates prepare to enter patent law.  History majors in law school have a great perspective on the context of the legal decisions we read about, especially in Constitutional law.  Speaking Spanish is nearly a prerequisite for certain jobs in legal aid offices.  Economics majors have a huge advantage in analyzing the policies behind property and contract law.  Major in what you find interesting, and do well in it.  In very bottom-line terms, that means making a good GPA and getting to know some of your professors so that they will be able to recommend you to law schools.  But from a broader perspective, if you study something you find interesting, you will be able to build on whatever you learned once you get to law school.  (Or, you may decide you don't want to go to law school at all, in which case you will have set yourself up for a career in something else that interests you.)

Don't worry about the LSAT right now.  Start studying a few months before the exam for a few hours a week -- you can improve your performance a lot with practice.  But it's not an issue at all right now.

So, let's suppose you find a major that you like, you're doing well, and you have some friends and some extracurricular activities in your life.  Well, if all that is going OK, then the best thing to do is to find out whether you want to be a lawyer.  Worry about law school later.  I like law school, some people don't, but it's only 3 years either way.  What matters is whether you will like being a lawyer.  Talk to any available lawyers or law students.  Volunteer to assist with something that will put you in contact with lawyers.

In any case, I strongly recommend working in some field for 2-3 years after you graduate from college before you enter law school.  The maturity you gain in that short span of time is really worth it.