Law School Discussion

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jacy85

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Re: Parental pride as a factor in law school selection
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2005, 11:35:21 AM »
I honestly don't know if my credit will be good enough?  But I think it very doubtful that I'll be able to take out $100K over three years with only my own future earning potential as collateral.

Student loans don't work quite the same as regular loans, as far as I'm aware.  If you're enrolled in an academic program, your credit is all you need.

Do you honestly think that every med student that takes out well over $200k in loans has good credit or even enough assest for collateral??

jacy85

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Re: Parental pride as a factor in law school selection
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2005, 11:41:14 AM »
If you're responsible with your credit (you *have* credit to begin with), dont' have a bajillion maxed out cards, and always make your payments on time, you shouldn't have a problem getting a student loan without a cosigner.

You can check your credit report now (like, asap if you haven't done so recently) to see what they say.  You can contact sallie mae and other lenders to see which score of the 3 they use, and what range your credit score has to be in that will allow you to not have a cosigner.

jacy85

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Re: Parental pride as a factor in law school selection
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2005, 11:48:27 AM »
NP. It'll probably ease your mind a bit to know where you stand in terms of private lenders, so you'll at least be able to see what your options are.  I mean, if you know your credit's good, and you've spoken to lenders about your possibilities, you can choose where you want to go based on your needs and desires, and not on your mom's signature.

good luck!  :)

WoeIsMe

Re: Parental pride as a factor in law school selection
« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2005, 01:40:35 PM »
This question reminds me of a crib I saw at babys-r-us.  It converts into a daybed and full bed.... even had a picture of some homely college age kid on the box... i bet the poor sucker is still breastfed and getting rocked to sleep at night.

Hmmm...well, I know some people don't have parents that deserve rewards, and others are too ungrateful to consider the interests of people around them in their decisionmaking processes, but for me it's a valid consideration.  While it's important to look out for Number One, so to speak, it's plain selfish not to even make your loved ones a factor in the process (if they are deserving, i.e. didn't neglect or abuse, etc.)

Considering that I am currently living in a completely different country from my mom, she is hardly breastfeeding me.

hth

Don't interpret that in reference to your situation.. the post was totally tangential.

The responses really aren't if they should be a factor, but to what degree they should factor in.  You mentioned parental pride as the factor which most think this has a rather low weighting and yes it is certainly varies from individual to individual.

So:
Harvard = weight1*x1 + weight2+x2 + weight3+x3 + weight_parental_influence*(parent_yes)
Stanford = weight1*x1 + weight2+x2 + weight3+x3 + weight_parental_influence*(parent_no)

is Harvard > Stanford?

pretty hokie, i know.

SleepyGuyYawn

Re: Parental pride as a factor in law school selection
« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2005, 01:52:24 PM »
The parent thing comes in to play with me for sure.  I do feel bad, for instance, about leaving the state of Michigan (and moving to Pittsburgh).  Even though I'm not going too far, my dad's done a lot for me (he lives in Western Michigan) and I feel bad I won't get to see him much. 

But I know that he wants to see what's best for me.  So in a way, what's best for me is what's best for him.