Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Recovery from Addiction... Is this approproate to mention in a statement???  (Read 3505 times)

jeflord

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 99
  • Fix it!
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - akalakk
    • View Profile
modified

giffy

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1592
  • Mo
    • View Profile
It is a risky but potentially rewarding topic. It is risky because
1)   It was recent and an adcomm may doubt you are in full recovery
2)   It highlights a negative about your past
3)   If done wrong it could come across as whiney or complaining
It could be rewarding because
1)   It shows how you overcame a problem in your life
2)   It ties together a low GPA with a reason and explains how you improved with evidence of your GPA going up
3)   It also explains a criminal record
4)   You have an excuse of sorts with your bipolar, which is also now under control
I canít really say whether you should go for it or not. The kicker is that no matter what you have to explain you DUI and you low GPA with something.

By the way, lots of people here get worked up about C&F, it is not as bad as they make it sound. Look at all the people practicing law and ask yourself if they all have squeaky clean pasts. While certain things will get you in trouble, most notably fraud, or current problems, everything else is generally not an issue. They just want full disclosure and evidence of change. Since you have those things you should be fine.

arc87

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
    • View Profile
    • ScenarioSolver
    • Email
Re: Recovery from Addiction... Is this approproate to mention in a statement???
« Reply #32 on: February 03, 2005, 07:24:02 PM »
PS is supposed to be about the poositives, DO NOT MENTION ANYTHING LIKE THIS.

LSAT Logic Games Expert
www.scenariosolver.com

NinMN19XX

  • Guest
Re: Recovery from Addiction... Is this approproate to mention in a statement???
« Reply #33 on: February 07, 2005, 05:06:57 AM »
 
 if u have 1 DUI, i wouldn't admit to having a problem.  1 dui can happen to anyone.  if u've had 5 DUI's i think u need to acknowledge u had a problem.  i'm a bit conflicted on how to say u are okay now.  i'm against anyone having to prove/show anything about medical history to law schools or the bar.

Runner-up

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1003
    • AOL Instant Messenger - NShawcross
    • View Profile
Re: Recovery from Addiction... Is this approproate to mention in a statement???
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2005, 05:24:36 AM »
Substance abuse even if its something you got over should be hidden at all costs.

On the personal side, law schools want to know about your personal growth and maturity, and mentioning anything like an alchohol addicion will just put the wrong image in their minds.

I got through a cocaine habit in college, but I never mentioned this because I knew it would sink me.

aryels

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 69
  • "I think I know the formula..."
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Recovery from Addiction... Is this approproate to mention in a statement???
« Reply #35 on: February 07, 2005, 06:55:01 AM »
Some people are more easily addicted than others. I wouldn't write 'alcoholic' or 'drug addict' on a resume, or a personal statement; I would be very careful with whom I would discuss the situation.

I once read somewhere that lawyers are near the top of the 'addictive personality' list.
Future lawyers could probably win the high-school awards of 'Most Likely to Become Addicted.'

Fortunately, those addictive traits also make lawyers who enjoy excessive studying and research, working long hours, and who enjoy the companionship of others with the same habits. We just don't label it as addiction. And I wouldn't worry about writing that on a resume or a personal statement.








"I enjoy being in school. I've learned so much already, with taking economics and law, and I have marketing and statistics coming up next."

kterrious

  • Guest
Re: Recovery from Addiction... Is this approproate to mention in a statement???
« Reply #36 on: February 07, 2005, 07:46:51 AM »
My sister-in-law was a heroin addict and she got into the U of Memphis 2 yrs ago.  She had been sober 7 yrs when she got in.  She pretty much had to disclose all b/c she had a felony conviction for theft during her run.  Right now, she is having to deal with something called "Impaired Professionals," who are trying to help her w. the state bar situation and she's having to take UAs every few weeks as evidence of her sobriety to present to the bar...
  With 2 yrs sobriety, it's risky.  With longer, it might be OK, but it would still be a real risk b/c the law schools and  state bars love to act as if they're morally above the rest of us mere mortals (the joke is that bar members are on daytime TV every 2 minutes chasing ambulances.

   Your protected by health privacy laws from having to disclose anything about it...In short, I think it's a real risk, it's the type of thing that COULD potentially really get you noticed, but then again could backfire...do you have a sponsor or know anyone in the program (a professor, maybe a lawyer or alum from your 1st choice?)  with more than half a brain who could maybe write you a rec and testify to youe involvement n and committment to your sobriety?


linquest

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
    • View Profile
Re: Recovery from Addiction... Is this approproate to mention in a statement???
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2005, 12:52:48 PM »
There is a PS about a recovering alcoholic in Montauk's "How To Get Into a Top Law School".  So, it's worked for somebody.  You may want to check the book out and read Montauk's comments regarding the essay.

Personally, I'd say go ahead and write about it in your PS.  If the DUI was really old history, I'd write the PS on something else and write about recovery in your DUI addendum.  However, I tend to think that because the incident is relatively recent, the Adcomm may want to know much more detail about what you've been doing recently and how you're going to deal with recovery while you're in law school.
Fed gov't atty