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Author Topic: Weird LSAT Question  (Read 15495 times)

smart

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2004, 01:13:31 PM »
Hi, could somebody help me out with this question please? I can't figure out which one is the best answer and the book has used this question as an example in the "Logical Reasoning" Strategies section without actually giving any explanation.

_____________________________ _____________________________ _

Most radicals who argue for violent revolution and complete overthrow of our existing society have no clear idea what will emerge from the destruction. They just assert that things are so bad now that any change would have to be a change for the better. But surely this is mistaken, for things might actually turn out to be worse.

The most effective point that can be raised against this argument is that the author says nothing about,

(A) the manner in which the radicals might foment their revolution.
(B) the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse.
(C) the economic arguments the radicals use to persuade people to join in their cause.
(D) the fact that most people are really satisfied with the present system so that the chance of total revolution is very small.
(E) the loss of life and property that is likely to accompany total destruction of a society.
Here is my thought: first the question (from where?) is not even close to real LSAT type question.  Second, the argument presented in the stimulus is extremely weak and simple.
Third, I beleive you must change the text as soon as possible, and use the actual real LSAT.
Finally, I beleive the answer is B.   What kind of question is this in terms of type?  Assumption or inference?  None of them. This is totally outside of the LSAT question type.   

Hocine

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2004, 03:18:07 PM »
Okay, I'm replying without reading the other replies, so I apologize if this is redundant...

My answer choice is B, scroll down for why.


Most radicals who argue for violent revolution and complete overthrow of our existing society have no clear idea what will emerge from the destruction. They just assert that things are so bad now that any change would have to be a change for the better. But surely this is mistaken, for things might actually turn out to be worse.

...what's wrong with this argument? ... it provides no support for the conclusion... so look for an answer choice that says "hey you didn't give even one premise that supports your conclusion that 'things might turn out to be worse'"

The most effective point that can be raised against this argument is that the author says nothing about,

(B) the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse.
"Really, they might turn out to be worse?  How?  Give me a specific result of the revolution that would be a change for the worse"


Actually this one was pretty easy, because once you've identified the conclusion, it's pretty easy to eliminate all the other answer choices..

legallyliz

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2004, 05:56:41 PM »
The question comes from ARCO's TestMasters book --

I was thinking TestMasters uses *real*, licensed LSAT questions ... it looks like it is not so

TestMasters (the prep course, www.testmasters180.com, DOES use real, previously administered LSAT questions.  ARCO is a completely different story (even if they do call their "TestMasters").

indeed

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2004, 09:44:46 AM »

TestMasters (the prep course, www.testmasters180.com, DOES use real, previously administered LSAT questions. ARCO is a completely different story (even if they do call their "TestMasters").

Some companies avoid the cost of licensing real LSAT questions altogether by using simulated LSAT questions in their courses. Whereas real LSAT questions are created by a carefully selected group of experienced psychometricians, simulated LSAT questions can be written by just about anybody. In addition, real LSAT questions, unlike simulated LSAT questions, are pretested on thousands of test takers in experimental sections in order to weed out questions that may be flawed or biased in some respect. As a result of these differences, simulated questions tend to be poor approximations of genuine ones. They contain language and exhibit syntax that the real test writers would never use, and the subject matter of these questions often deviates substantially from what appears on the real exam. Incredibly, many of the answer choices that are labeled correct on simulated questions would constitute incorrect answer choices on the real LSAT. Students who work with simulated questions confuse what is not the LSAT with what really is the LSAT and may end up lowering their scores as a result. Consequently, students should avoid LSAT preparation courses that make use of simulated questions. In addition, consumers should be aware of the fact that simulated questions are especially prevalent in many LSAT preparation books that are currently on the market. Publishers such as Barron's, Cliffs, Peterson's, and Arco sell inexpensive study guides that contain only simulated questions. These publishers collectively define the low end of the LSAT preparation industry.

http://www.testmasters180.com/lsat/whyWeAreTheBest/LSATquestions.aspx

WitterUin4

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2004, 05:10:10 PM »
B.
I'm at 1L at CU Boulder

St. Shaun

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2004, 09:09:32 AM »
Man, this makes me want to study for the LSAT again. [meant to be read as] I'm sure glad I don't have to study for the freaking LSAT anymore.
You can't make everyone happy...
but you can sure piss everyone off.

menses1

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2005, 10:22:20 PM »
Hahaha! This is a pretty funny question stem!
- What's the difference between an accountant and a lawyer?
- Accountants know they're boring.

underwhelm

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2005, 10:25:35 PM »
I agree B and I agree that it's not a real question.

emmanuelle

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2005, 08:27:39 PM »
the specific results of the revolution that would be changes for the worse. It is framed as if the radical revoultion is bad

bogyaa

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Re: Weird LSAT Question
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2005, 11:11:02 AM »
The answer is B because the argument in the stem states that those who argue for anarchy give no ways in which the anarchy mentioned could provide for better society, but the stem gives no ways in which the anarchy mentioned could provide for a worse society.  Hence, B, which states that the stem author gives no examples of ways in which the anarchy could produce bad results, must be correct.