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Paperback Writer

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« on: January 12, 2005, 11:44:21 AM »
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sheaday

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Re: University of Toledo - Surprise
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2005, 04:26:39 PM »
Toledo is actually free if you apply thru their website 

I'm not sure what you mean by certification letter, but I applied thru their website and they didnt ask for anything like that.

wrmusgro

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Re: University of Toledo - Surprise
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2005, 06:40:16 PM »
Toledo is actually free if you apply thru their website 

I'm not sure what you mean by certification letter, but I applied thru their website and they didnt ask for anything like that.

Free?  Really?  I wish LSACD on the web would make you aware of that!

Well, generally, you'd find that out when you researched the school's website before you decided to apply. You did research the school right? Oh well, law schools always need donations! ;)

wrmusgro

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Re: University of Toledo - Surprise
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2005, 07:22:54 PM »
Toledo is actually free if you apply thru their website 

I'm not sure what you mean by certification letter, but I applied thru their website and they didnt ask for anything like that.

Free?  Really?  I wish LSACD on the web would make you aware of that!

Well, generally, you'd find that out when you researched the school's website before you decided to apply. You did research the school right? Oh well, law schools always need donations! ;)

I hate to say this, but I actually don't usually go to the school's website.  If I am to make a decision about a school, why would I look at their site?  I figure it will be just cheerleading about their own program.  I look at USNWR, ABA, Princeton Review, and other third party (assuming objective) sources.

I just found a good reason -- FEE WAIVERS.

I'm still bummed, however, by LSAC's inability to give me the heads up.  I purchased that rather expensive service, and should receive that kind of information.

LSAC seems to only care about money......hence their monoply on the entire law school admissions process. Which brings up something interesting.......since they have a monopoly aren't they in essence breaking the law? But as a service that whores itself out to future lawyers and law schools, isn't there something inherently wrong with this? Could someone actually sue LSAC and break them up? Oh well...just a thought.

h2xblive

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Re: University of Toledo - Surprise
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2006, 01:28:58 AM »
Toledo is actually free if you apply thru their website 

I'm not sure what you mean by certification letter, but I applied thru their website and they didnt ask for anything like that.

Free?  Really?  I wish LSACD on the web would make you aware of that!

Well, generally, you'd find that out when you researched the school's website before you decided to apply. You did research the school right? Oh well, law schools always need donations! ;)

I hate to say this, but I actually don't usually go to the school's website.  If I am to make a decision about a school, why would I look at their site?  I figure it will be just cheerleading about their own program.  I look at USNWR, ABA, Princeton Review, and other third party (assuming objective) sources.

I just found a good reason -- FEE WAIVERS.

I'm still bummed, however, by LSAC's inability to give me the heads up.  I purchased that rather expensive service, and should receive that kind of information.

LSAC seems to only care about money......hence their monoply on the entire law school admissions process. Which brings up something interesting.......since they have a monopoly aren't they in essence breaking the law? But as a service that whores itself out to future lawyers and law schools, isn't there something inherently wrong with this? Could someone actually sue LSAC and break them up? Oh well...just a thought.

I hope you're studying corporate law right now...

prolesurge

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Re: University of Toledo - Surprise
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2006, 02:07:57 PM »
Toledo is actually free if you apply thru their website 

I'm not sure what you mean by certification letter, but I applied thru their website and they didnt ask for anything like that.

Free?  Really?  I wish LSACD on the web would make you aware of that!

Well, generally, you'd find that out when you researched the school's website before you decided to apply. You did research the school right? Oh well, law schools always need donations! ;)

I hate to say this, but I actually don't usually go to the school's website.  If I am to make a decision about a school, why would I look at their site?  I figure it will be just cheerleading about their own program.  I look at USNWR, ABA, Princeton Review, and other third party (assuming objective) sources.

I just found a good reason -- FEE WAIVERS.

I'm still bummed, however, by LSAC's inability to give me the heads up.  I purchased that rather expensive service, and should receive that kind of information.

LSAC seems to only care about money......hence their monoply on the entire law school admissions process. Which brings up something interesting.......since they have a monopoly aren't they in essence breaking the law? But as a service that whores itself out to future lawyers and law schools, isn't there something inherently wrong with this? Could someone actually sue LSAC and break them up? Oh well...just a thought.

From a Reading Comprehension question on the 1991 LSAT-

"Even if the firm, upon acquiring monopoly power, chooses to raise prices in order to increase profits, it would not be in violation of the antitrust laws. The antitrust prohibitions focus instead on abuses of monopoly power that exclude competition in the monoplized market or involve leverage."

Blah blah blah. It is not illegal to have a monopoly, it is just illegal to abuse the power that the monoply gives you. If the LSAT started packaging its services in such a way that it hurt an adjunct market-say, it started stipulating that if you did LSAT prep with Kaplan or Princeton Review instead of with the registered LSDAS Superawsome Prep service, then it would be in violation of anti-trust laws.