Law School Discussion

Falsifying Minority Status

Tom

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2005, 02:58:58 PM »
I had this conundrum also. My father is from Argentina and my mother is British. That means that I am mixed. After deliberating and asking people about this I decided to put Hispanic and add a diversity statement explaining that my father is from Argentina and so forth. The reality is that everyone who could be able to do this would so I am going to take any opposition to this course of action as hypocrisy. By the way, I don't this will add much but even if it adds a little it is worthwhile. If I am ever asked about my spanish background I have ample proof that my father was born in Argentina.

Are you a "cranker"?

BigTex

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2005, 02:59:36 PM »
I had this conundrum also. My father is from Argentina and my mother is British. That means that I am mixed. After deliberating and asking people about this I decided to put Hispanic and add a diversity statement explaining that my father is from Argentina and so forth. The reality is that everyone who could be able to do this would so I am going to take any opposition to this course of action as hypocrisy. By the way, I don't this will add much but even if it adds a little it is worthwhile. If I am ever asked about my spanish background I have ample proof that my father was born in Argentina.

So, your father is from Argentina, but is he Hispanic? There's lots of white folk in Argentina. If he's hispanic, i don't see any problem w/ this, especially since you added an addendum explaining everything. The adcoms can then make up their own minds about whether or not to give you URM status.

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2005, 03:07:21 PM »
To the best of my knowledge, anyone who is born in Argentina is Hispanic. This is the impression I got also from two other LSD posters who mentioned that although they are white, they put Hispanic. Since some people who are white put Native American (even though this represents 1/18 of their background) I don't think that the issue has to do with color. I spoke to my father about this and he said it is fine to put Hispanic. I think Latino and Hispanic seem to be different categories in this sense. The issue is also a matter of self identification - all of my cousins speak Spanish, my father was born there and based on these factors I think that I would have to purposefully ignore this side of me in order to just plainly put Caucasian. I think I put Caucasian on my college applications because then I was ignorant and thought URM status was a liability ( plus as I mentioned before since I am mixed this not a lie).Admittedly, there is a large likelihood that I will not receive a substantial boost based on my background.... but in the numbers game that LS admissions is even a small one would be welcomed.

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2005, 03:08:06 PM »
I had this conundrum also. My father is from Argentina and my mother is British. That means that I am mixed. After deliberating and asking people about this I decided to put Hispanic and add a diversity statement explaining that my father is from Argentina and so forth. The reality is that everyone who could be able to do this would so I am going to take any opposition to this course of action as hypocrisy. By the way, I don't this will add much but even if it adds a little it is worthwhile. If I am ever asked about my spanish background I have ample proof that my father was born in Argentina.

Are you a "cranker"?

What does this word mean?

Foot Fetish

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2005, 03:11:28 PM »
I had this conundrum also. My father is from Argentina and my mother is British. That means that I am mixed. After deliberating and asking people about this I decided to put Hispanic and add a diversity statement explaining that my father is from Argentina and so forth. The reality is that everyone who could be able to do this would so I am going to take any opposition to this course of action as hypocrisy. By the way, I don't this will add much but even if it adds a little it is worthwhile. If I am ever asked about my spanish background I have ample proof that my father was born in Argentina.

Unless you speak Spanish, I'd say that you were stretching it a bit.  Being "Hispanic" is not a racial classification.  It's a cultural classification.  If you don't speak the language of that culture, then I don't see how you can say that you are a member of that culture.

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2005, 03:17:30 PM »
I had this conundrum also. My father is from Argentina and my mother is British. That means that I am mixed. After deliberating and asking people about this I decided to put Hispanic and add a diversity statement explaining that my father is from Argentina and so forth. The reality is that everyone who could be able to do this would so I am going to take any opposition to this course of action as hypocrisy. By the way, I don't this will add much but even if it adds a little it is worthwhile. If I am ever asked about my spanish background I have ample proof that my father was born in Argentina.

Unless you speak Spanish, I'd say that you were stretching it a bit.  Being "Hispanic" is not a racial classification.  It's a cultural classification.  If you don't speak the language of that culture, then I don't see how you can say that you are a member of that culture.

That actually is one of the least important factors. There are many 3rd generation, 2nd generation Mexican Americans who barely speak Spanish. One could argue that learning Spanish for the next 5 months till 1L commences is worth the boost. Again my situation is ambiguous or questionable or however you want to call it..... therefore I have attached a diversity statement that clearly explains that my father was born in Argentina, bla bla. As I mentioned above if you were right it would be wonderful since anyone could theoretically purchase a berlitz travel dictionary and put down Spanish. On the contrary, the cultural aspect is what I have been exposed to more than the economic aspect. My cousins all speak Spanish and eat Spanish cuisines but I am not from an economically disadvantaged family or something of this nature....

Foot Fetish

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2005, 03:39:57 PM »
I had this conundrum also. My father is from Argentina and my mother is British. That means that I am mixed. After deliberating and asking people about this I decided to put Hispanic and add a diversity statement explaining that my father is from Argentina and so forth. The reality is that everyone who could be able to do this would so I am going to take any opposition to this course of action as hypocrisy. By the way, I don't this will add much but even if it adds a little it is worthwhile. If I am ever asked about my spanish background I have ample proof that my father was born in Argentina.

Unless you speak Spanish, I'd say that you were stretching it a bit.  Being "Hispanic" is not a racial classification.  It's a cultural classification.  If you don't speak the language of that culture, then I don't see how you can say that you are a member of that culture.

That actually is one of the least important factors. There are many 3rd generation, 2nd generation Mexican Americans who barely speak Spanish. One could argue that learning Spanish for the next 5 months till 1L commences is worth the boost. Again my situation is ambiguous or questionable or however you want to call it..... therefore I have attached a diversity statement that clearly explains that my father was born in Argentina, bla bla. As I mentioned above if you were right it would be wonderful since anyone could theoretically purchase a berlitz travel dictionary and put down Spanish. On the contrary, the cultural aspect is what I have been exposed to more than the economic aspect. My cousins all speak Spanish and eat Spanish cuisines but I am not from an economically disadvantaged family or something of this nature....

I'm not focusing on the language, but the culture.  If you are truly a part of the Hispanic culture, then you will speak Spanish.  Pure and simple.  Learning the Spanish language does not make you Hispanic.  There are plenty of blonde-haired, blue-eyed Hispanics, BTW.

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #17 on: January 02, 2005, 04:05:38 PM »
I had this conundrum also. My father is from Argentina and my mother is British. That means that I am mixed. After deliberating and asking people about this I decided to put Hispanic and add a diversity statement explaining that my father is from Argentina and so forth. The reality is that everyone who could be able to do this would so I am going to take any opposition to this course of action as hypocrisy. By the way, I don't this will add much but even if it adds a little it is worthwhile. If I am ever asked about my spanish background I have ample proof that my father was born in Argentina.

Unless you speak Spanish, I'd say that you were stretching it a bit.  Being "Hispanic" is not a racial classification.  It's a cultural classification.  If you don't speak the language of that culture, then I don't see how you can say that you are a member of that culture.

That actually is one of the least important factors. There are many 3rd generation, 2nd generation Mexican Americans who barely speak Spanish. One could argue that learning Spanish for the next 5 months till 1L commences is worth the boost. Again my situation is ambiguous or questionable or however you want to call it..... therefore I have attached a diversity statement that clearly explains that my father was born in Argentina, bla bla. As I mentioned above if you were right it would be wonderful since anyone could theoretically purchase a berlitz travel dictionary and put down Spanish. On the contrary, the cultural aspect is what I have been exposed to more than the economic aspect. My cousins all speak Spanish and eat Spanish cuisines but I am not from an economically disadvantaged family or something of this nature....

I'm not focusing on the language, but the culture.  If you are truly a part of the Hispanic culture, then you will speak Spanish.  Pure and simple.  Learning the Spanish language does not make you Hispanic.  There are plenty of blonde-haired, blue-eyed Hispanics, BTW.

Ok fair enough so according to you I am not part of the Spanish culture. Again these definitions seem to be flimsy at best. It is now up to adcoms to decide if I add diversity to their school.

wrmusgro

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2005, 04:20:19 PM »
I'm just curious how easy people think it would be to claim a minority ethnicity on applications. How do schools verify the ethnic heritage of applicants? Will they straight up ask you for proof or will they take your word for it?

Just put a lot of slang into your PS?  :P

Oh, that must be because only minorities use slang. ::)

Ruskie - I think you are jumping to conclusions and pre-judging Russian Concussion.  You do know that rural white appalachians are given preference at many schools, don't you?

If that's actually true, fine, but concussion's statement was inherently offensive.  He implied that one can imply minority status by using slang in one's writing.  That assumes that minorities are more likely to use slang and that assumption is derrogatory.

How dare someone be offensive on this chat board! Lets call the on-line police and get them involved in this!

gobie55

Re: Falsifying Minority Status
« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2005, 04:24:36 PM »
People, the guy is clearly joking, and its not like they didn't make a HUGE MOVIE about this exact thing.