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Author Topic: All about the prestige???  (Read 652 times)

marcus06

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All about the prestige???
« on: December 31, 2004, 03:17:30 PM »
I'm pretty new to this board and just skim over posts every once in a while. I wanted some feedback from people about choosing between schools. I realize that a choice between schools such as UCLA and USC would be arbitrary in the long run, but how about between USC and a higher ranked school such as Georgetown, Cornell, or even Penn? I intend to work in SoCal after law school so I was wondering what people would do in this situation. Do prestige and rankings really matter that much?

Southern Gentleman

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Re: All about the prestige???
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2004, 10:04:21 PM »
A simple rule of thumb -- If your not going to a top 14 school, then choose a school in the region you want to practice, the best one you can. A T2 school in NYC will do you less good than a well-respected, networked T3 (maybe even T4) in Southern Cal, for instance.

good luck  :)
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burghblast

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Re: All about the prestige???
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2005, 01:40:45 AM »
A simple rule of thumb -- If your not going to a top 14 school, then choose a school in the region you want to practice, the best one you can. A T2 school in NYC will do you less good than a well-respected, networked T3 (maybe even T4) in Southern Cal, for instance.

good luck  :)

Yeah this is the hardest part about the admissions process.  I have no idea where I want to practice and I certainly don't want to committ myself to any area of the country for 10 years or more.  But it's not likely I'll get into a T14.  What to do, what to do...

Tippy Farmbuckle

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Re: All about the prestige???
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2005, 02:34:14 AM »
A simple rule of thumb -- If your not going to a top 14 school, then choose a school in the region you want to practice, the best one you can. A T2 school in NYC will do you less good than a well-respected, networked T3 (maybe even T4) in Southern Cal, for instance.

good luck :)

Yeah this is the hardest part about the admissions process. I have no idea where I want to practice and I certainly don't want to committ myself to any area of the country for 10 years or more. But it's not likely I'll get into a T14. What to do, what to do...

i agree with what southern gent. said...and burgh, i think you should be a little more optimistic, your gpa is low but you have a tough major, which should count for something and your lsat(s) is/are pretty damn good...with a strong app and good ps, i think you definately have a shot.

St. Shaun

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Re: All about the prestige???
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2005, 02:50:30 AM »
burghblaster, I would be suprised if you didn't get into Michigan or Northwestern since Northwestern claims to value students who have "real world experience".
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burghblast

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Re: All about the prestige???
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2005, 03:15:44 AM »
burghblaster, I would be suprised if you didn't get into Michigan or Northwestern since Northwestern claims to value students who have "real world experience".

Yeah, Northwestern is actually my greatest hope at this point.  I had my interview earlier this week and the interviewer didn't seem to care much about my GPA.  I think he had it in his head that 2.9 was "average" for engineering or something.  And he said he got into Northwestern 10 years ago with a 3.1 on the strength of his LSAT.  Still, nobody below a 3.00 can optimistically predict their chances at any T14 with great certainty.