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Author Topic: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?  (Read 3861 times)

Eyes of the World

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2004, 03:05:55 PM »
You should try posting this question on the Students & Graduates board; they would probably be able to provide some insight since they are all in school and we are all trying to get into school  ;)

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/

I'd be interested in hearing the response you receive.

Hello, I placed the posting below on the general board and only received a web site link.  I'm hoping to get some further insight from those who have more in common that are going throught the process as older applicants....


I'm a 30 year old white male decided to pursue the law degree that I decided not to pursue after a very mediocre undergrad track record (3.0 GPA, 2.8 LSDAS adjusted?, University of Florida).  I have a very solid resume that includes the sales and management of multi-million dollar projects and management of staff in various businesses with significant legal exposure.  Currently, I am launching a new division of a property/facilities management organization.

In terms of LSAT, I got a 153 in October, which was far below my diagnostic tests.  I retook the test in December and received a 163.  My recommendations are all non-academic from senior level executives that I have either done business with or have worked for.

My objective is practice law in either New York, Florida, or Washington, DC.  Any help that anyone can lend into where they think I may be accepted or rejected will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance....



fabdiva

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2004, 05:16:13 PM »
p.s a 163 is a totally great score. I wish I had one.

Grannypants,

Did you take the LSAT more than once or simply write an addendum for the single LSAT score? I couldn't tell from your earlier post whether you had taken the LSAT more than once. If you did write an addendum to explain the single LSAT score, what did you say? The reason I ask is that I've been debating submitting an addendum, as I scored far lower on the Dec 04 test than my practice tests (victim of the flu) but thought that it would only be valid if I took the test again and did significantly better.

 Congrats, btw, on the interview with NU. That's great.

grannypants

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #22 on: December 30, 2004, 05:38:17 PM »
p.s a 163 is a totally great score. I wish I had one.

Grannypants,

Did you take the LSAT more than once or simply write an addendum for the single LSAT score? I couldn't tell from your earlier post whether you had taken the LSAT more than once. If you did write an addendum to explain the single LSAT score, what did you say? The reason I ask is that I've been debating submitting an addendum, as I scored far lower on the Dec 04 test than my practice tests (victim of the flu) but thought that it would only be valid if I took the test again and did significantly better.

 Congrats, btw, on the interview with NU. That's great.

Thanks for the congrats but they interview everyone but its really impressing everybody heheee...I took the LCRAP in December and stunk up the joint. I have a litany of ld's that I never really wanted to disclose but I really needed the extra time but I needed a huge report filed and my special ed. lady ( the one that does the testing etc) so I got shot down on my accomodations (all of them....like a non scantron sheet...denied) about a week before the test. I tested in the 160's on practice tests( I took nearly 40) that were timed (ok not quite 160s on those guys but close) but with five extra min. I kicked ass. I wasn't happy that I had to 'expose' myself to LSDAS etc but I bombed the lsat. I mean, no where near the range I tested in (I can't bring myself to mention the score but I would be thrilled if I got a 156 and did not come close) Anyway, sorry for the babbling...I really really really didn't want the law schools to know about the ld stuff b/c I found out in high school and managed to go to a good school but I am writing an addendum (ok wrote) that spells out my academic history that I have performed far beyond all my evil advisors predictions....etc etc...so I am not going to take the LSAT again b/c well I am going to see what the law schools have to say. If I am shot down everywhere, then I will retake it but I am just going to stress what makes a great addition to their schools even if I may need a few extra min. now and then. I don't know...I am still thinking about taking it in Feb but grrrrr......

mcleod13

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #23 on: December 31, 2004, 06:59:15 PM »
I can honestly say that I feel for all of you as I know exactly what you are going through. Let me tell you my story.
I joined the Navy right out of High School and was in until this August. I have taken the LSAT 2 times. I got a 144 and a 146 and I KNOW that this is no where near my ability.
     The first time I took the test, I was informed by a professor that was teaching a class I was taking on base that I didn't need to prep that the LSAT was just basically math and english basic knowledge. WTF!!! Needless to say I bombed. I didn't cancel because right after the test I had to report back to my duty station and deploy.
     The second time I took the test, I thought I had studied but hadn't found this board or any other so I didn't know how to study. I was usually scoring around a 155 anyway. Well the day before the test, my command got called to base on a sunday and we were informed that a co-worker had been killed in IRAQ. I took the test the next day and the proctors kept cutting our time short by about 2.5 minutes and got the 146.
     I am prepping the right time this time and know that I will score pretty high.
     I want to go to school in Florida and would Love to go to FSU, Stetson, or Miami. I have a whole list of intangibles that I think would be of some use to me but I dunno. I am nervous that I won't get into a decent school at all.
     I just hope that the fact that I had to take the dang LCRAP 3 times doesn't kill all my chances.

Highway

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #24 on: December 31, 2004, 07:49:13 PM »
One big personal advantage we may have over some younger applicants is probably just perspective.  If for whatever reason this all doesn't work out, I do have other options - my life hasn't been centered on the pursuit of law school to the exclusion of other goals.

I totally resemble that remark! It was completely weird talking to these "kids" taking the LSAT and watching them freak out about it. It's pretty much the culmination of their existence up to that point. Being a non-trad definitely has its advantages in that manner. I don't *have* to go to law school. It won't kill me if I don't get in. The worst that could happen is I continue to advance in my company on a different route than as a lawyer.

Still, I can remember those feelings of dread when I took the med school admission test (MCAT) a dozen years ago. This feels much nicer now.

Jeff

3.4 uGPA, 3.9 grad GPA, 158 LSAT, 5+ years WE
Applying to just one school (evening division) - let the games begin...

Guy Incognito

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #25 on: December 31, 2004, 08:01:02 PM »
I agree with the LSAT part.  I saw several "kids" pouring over their study guides sitting outside waiting for the test to start.  I gave it a "pffttt", smoked a cigarette, had a cup of coffee and went in. 

At least we could tear up our score if we didn't like it and pretend it never happened.  Sort of anyway. 

"It's okay, I saw an episode of Matlock in a bar last night. The sound wasn't on, but I got the gist of it" - Lionel Hutz