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Author Topic: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?  (Read 3911 times)

Monkey

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2004, 12:17:24 PM »
Well it's nice to know that other people are feeling the same way....and like you, I'm applying to some outside my range for the same reason.  At least you got your lsat score first time out.  I expected my 163 first time out and scored 10 points lower, so they'll be averaging a 163 and 153 for me at most schools.

That's frustrating...can you write an addendum explaining why they should overlook the lower score and consider the 163 the true measure of your ability?  Anything personal going on around the time of the first test, etc?  From what I read, if there's any mitigating circumstances whatsoever, even if it seems silly to you, they want to know about it.  (Obviously, presented in a matter-of-fact and concise way, not a whiny, "poor-poor-me" one.) :)
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ssd2612

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2004, 12:20:28 PM »
only thing is first time i took test was at fairfield univesity in CT.  During the last section, a track meet started going on outside with a bunch of girls screaming really loud.  I thought I blocked it out, but I absolutely bombed that section that I normally got all but a few right in.

I'm hesitant to talk about it in a personal essay b/c I'm afraid that it will look like I'm whining and making excuses.

Monkey

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2004, 12:30:21 PM »
only thing is first time i took test was at fairfield univesity in CT.  During the last section, a track meet started going on outside with a bunch of girls screaming really loud.  I thought I blocked it out, but I absolutely bombed that section that I normally got all but a few right in.

I'm hesitant to talk about it in a personal essay b/c I'm afraid that it will look like I'm whining and making excuses.

Again, this is anecdotal advice, but I've read a lot of posts that say, if you have a significant difference in your scores and can provide a reason why that might've been the case, you should definitely do so.  I wouldn't address it in your personal statement - just attach a separate, short (1 paragraph) addendum.  I'd just address it very matter-of-factly: During the last section of my first LSAT, a track meet began just outside the room, and created a great deal of noise.  When I received my score, it was well below what I had expected, and it was apparent that I had done far worse on the final section than on the previous sections.  I retook the LSAT in XXX '04 and received a score that was much more in line with my practice tests.  I feel that my second LSAT is far more representative of my true abilities, and ask that you give that score more weight.  (That's off-the-cuff and sounds dumb but you get the point.)  You might want to ask around for more input, but that's a huge jump in your score, so it seems like a legit reason to me.
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ssd2612

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2004, 12:32:16 PM »
I appreciate the advice, and it does not sound dumb. What about for places that I already applied to before receiving the score.  Do they take info after the fact typically?

Monkey

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2004, 12:34:31 PM »
I appreciate the advice, and it does not sound dumb. What about for places that I already applied to before receiving the score.  Do they take info after the fact typically?
Not sure about that, but they'll obviously receive your new score from LSAC, so my feeling is that sending each of them an addendum to explain the difference in score can only help you.  They'll add it to your file for consideration, unless a decision has already been made (if that's the case I'm not sure what happens - if they'll reconsider, etc.  I'd contact the schools themselves and just ask, most are pretty happy to help.)
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grannypants

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2004, 12:40:26 PM »
My biggest fear is also being stuck with a bunch of 21 year olds still having keg parties. One of my friends that is my age and started at John Marshall here is having some problems like that. At their holiday party, she was asked if she was a professor!! Yeesh....we're both 26. HOw sad. I don't think WE whitewashes a less than stellar ugpa but WE is always a plus. I have an interview at Northwestern next week so I will see if I can get any scoop on this mystery. I know it sucks that schools use such hard numbers but a little part of me likes to believe that some schools maybe dump our apps in a diff. pile and go from there. I think someone with my crap ass numbers right from undergrad would get tossed into the crapper but maybe adcomms see that my ugpa is from the 1990s so maybe they might hestistate and then toss it in the crapper. Hope springs eternal....
Also, I wrote an addendum that addressed my lousy lsat score and I was so hesitant to write one but I think its a non-whining, good piece that gives my application a holistic feel to it. I am not apoligizing to them though for not having a 4.0 bc the average gpa at my school was a 3.1 so I am right on target with that but no way I am apoligizing. I earned my C in Calculus. I was happy to get a C- in physics.

grannypants

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2004, 12:43:02 PM »
only thing is first time i took test was at fairfield univesity in CT.  During the last section, a track meet started going on outside with a bunch of girls screaming really loud.  I thought I blocked it out, but I absolutely bombed that section that I normally got all but a few right in.

I'm hesitant to talk about it in a personal essay b/c I'm afraid that it will look like I'm whining and making excuses.

Again, this is anecdotal advice, but I've read a lot of posts that say, if you have a significant difference in your scores and can provide a reason why that might've been the case, you should definitely do so.  I wouldn't address it in your personal statement - just attach a separate, short (1 paragraph) addendum.  I'd just address it very matter-of-factly: During the last section of my first LSAT, a track meet began just outside the room, and created a great deal of noise.  When I received my score, it was well below what I had expected, and it was apparent that I had done far worse on the final section than on the previous sections.  I retook the LSAT in XXX '04 and received a score that was much more in line with my practice tests.  I feel that my second LSAT is far more representative of my true abilities, and ask that you give that score more weight.  (That's off-the-cuff and sounds dumb but you get the point.)  You might want to ask around for more input, but that's a huge jump in your score, so it seems like a legit reason to me.
I think Monkey has great advice. How can one day and one test have such influence over our destinies?

grannypants

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2004, 01:34:58 PM »
Hello, I placed the posting below on the general board and only received a web site link.  I'm hoping to get some further insight from those who have more in common that are going throught the process as older applicants....


I'm a 30 year old white male decided to pursue the law degree that I decided not to pursue after a very mediocre undergrad track record (3.0 GPA, 2.8 LSDAS adjusted?, University of Florida).  I have a very solid resume that includes the sales and management of multi-million dollar projects and management of staff in various businesses with significant legal exposure.  Currently, I am launching a new division of a property/facilities management organization.

In terms of LSAT, I got a 153 in October, which was far below my diagnostic tests.  I retook the test in December and received a 163.  My recommendations are all non-academic from senior level executives that I have either done business with or have worked for.

My objective is practice law in either New York, Florida, or Washington, DC.  Any help that anyone can lend into where they think I may be accepted or rejected will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance....

Oh my gosh, why were they so mean to you on the other board?? Youngsters! Also, I think UC Berkeley is the only T1 school to admit that they have taken people with 148 LSATS so remember that their numbers are all on the bell curve...there are bound to be some with less than great numbers that became great students at almost every school. I think you have a great shot at American, Cordoza, ( I don't know much about these schools b/c I am not looking at them) but it seems that everybody wants to go to Georgetown these days but you never know unless you try and it also seems to be some young punks too that are applying en masse. I am so not much of a help with your geographic areas. Just shake what your mama gave you!

grannypants

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2004, 01:37:39 PM »
p.s a 163 is a totally great score. I wish I had one.

ssd2612

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Re: 30 Year Old Male Applicant - how much do intangibles play into decision?
« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2004, 01:43:12 PM »
Thanks to all, you've been a big help.  Best of luck to all of us!