Law School Discussion

(Revived) Latino/a Thread

maricutie

Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2005, 02:19:34 PM »
For me, I spoke strictly Spanish up until kindergarden. Then I'd come home and teach my younger brother all the english words i'd learned at school. The result was that my brother and I grew to talking almost all english to each other. Once my mom learned english as well we'd talk to her in that language and she'd respond in spanish -- it was most comfortable for both us that way. Thankfully I took 4 years of spanish in HS, which really developed and brought back my spanish. Now, however, I need to freshen up on occasion ... 

BigTex

Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2005, 02:28:34 PM »
On the language topic, it's really strange with me. I can't speak spanish to a Spanish speaker i meet on the street. Not at all. I don't speak spanish.

But ...

When I go home to my grandmother's house, back when she used to be alive, after I was there a few days i would find myself speaking spanish w/ my grandmother. Basic stuff: "I'm hungry grandma, when's dinner?", etc. And, suddenly, i would catch myself: "holy moly - i'm speaking spanish!!!". But, inevitably, as soon as I left my grandmother's house and was back home i couldn't speak a word of spanish.

Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #32 on: January 04, 2005, 07:50:42 AM »
What do you guys think about socioeconomic status in minority admissions? should a middle to upper class hispanic get the same preference as a working class one?

one could argue that just by being a different race or color gives you a unique perspective and adds to the diversity of the class, which is the aim. also, the pool of qualified minorities, especially for top schools, is already tiny, and chances are that the majority of that pool come from upper class families. so why make that pool even smaller to where there is little to no representation at all?

I would like to hear thoughts from everyone on this

BigTex

Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2005, 08:08:49 AM »
Personally, i feel that "poor white trash" (i use that term affectionately - half my family is PWT, the other is poor mex-am) offer just as much of an under-represented, diverse viewpoint as do poor mexican americans. I've got white family growing up in trailer parks where the poverty is just brutal and the cycle is rarely ever broken. I've also got poor mex-am family living in various barrios around south texas.

Both are harsh environments. But if anything, i'd say the kid growing up in the trailer park has it worse. This is because the family support system in mex-am families is so solid and strong and it really works. Unfortunately, not so much in the trailer parks.

So, in my humble opinion, if an adcom were looking at two applicants, one who broke free from the trailer park cycle of poverty and one who broke free from the poverty of a mex-am barrio, they should be looked at pretty much equally in terms of diverse background and overcoming adversity. IMO, both should be given URM status.

maricutie

Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2005, 08:51:22 AM »
First of all, I'm going to be coming from a biased perspective, both from my personal experiences and because I'd qualify under both racial- and SES- based AA. That having been said, however, I think a two-pronged system should be the way to go. I too have many poor white friends who are being categorized and compared in the same barrel as their upper-class priviledged counterparts, and it sucks to think that this is what's happening. On the other hand, diversity is definately in demand at law schools, as it should be.

Such a two-pronged system could categorize those ppl who'd come from a low socio-econ background regardless of race. Much like current AA systems, they should be looked at in comparison to each other. In a separate category would be those from ethnic/racial groups that were in the minority at law schools.  Hispanics, Blacks, Laotians, Germans, etc. These could be considered the 'diversity' admits.

I don't know what the percentage of the total admitted class is accepted because of current AA policies, but under the above it could be split 50-50. There'd also be those (probably not many out of the total number) who could be considered under both as well.

Hey ... this is a pretty good idea, if i don't say so myself! :)   

ginthailand

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Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #35 on: January 04, 2005, 09:17:19 AM »
Hispanics, Blacks, Laotians, Germans, etc. These could be considered the 'diversity' admits.

Laotians...I don't think most Americans could point to Laos on a map.  The correct term is "Lao", but thanks for mentioning them.  Great place to live, BTW.




maricutie

Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #36 on: January 04, 2005, 09:25:33 AM »
Hispanics, Blacks, Laotians, Germans, etc. These could be considered the 'diversity' admits.

Laotians...I don't think most Americans could point to Laos on a map.  The correct term is "Lao", but thanks for mentioning them.  Great place to live, BTW.

My mistake ... I could have sworn I saw the term 'laotians' printed in some book reference. I mentioned them specifically b/c they (as well as many other disadvantaged asians) are always being lumped together into the studious-asian stereotype. Thankfully, I think adcoms people are making progress on this, albeit slow. Thanks for the info.  :)

Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #37 on: January 04, 2005, 09:38:15 AM »
this reminds me of that King of the Hill episode where Hanks neighbor Khan moves in. Maybe this is where you remembered "Laotian" from Maricutie?


Hank: So, are you Chinese or Japanese?
Khan (in thick Laotian accent): I live in California last twenty year, but first come from Laos.
Hank: Huh?
Khan: Laos. We Laotian.
Bill (Hank's friend): The ocean? What ocean?
Khan: We are Laotian. From Laos, stupid. It's a landlocked country in southeast Asia. It's between Vietnam and Thailand, okay? Population 4.7 million.
(Blank stares from Hank and company.)
Hank: So... are you Chinese or Japanese?



Hispanics, Blacks, Laotians, Germans, etc. These could be considered the 'diversity' admits.

Laotians...I don't think most Americans could point to Laos on a map.  The correct term is "Lao", but thanks for mentioning them.  Great place to live, BTW.

My mistake ... I could have sworn I saw the term 'laotians' printed in some book reference. I mentioned them specifically b/c they (as well as many other disadvantaged asians) are always being lumped together into the studious-asian stereotype. Thankfully, I think adcoms people are making progress on this, albeit slow. Thanks for the info.  :)

BigTex

Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #38 on: January 04, 2005, 09:42:35 AM »
that's hilarious! i was thinking of the same thing! What made it so funny was that hank and his budds were very proud of themselves for knowing that there are 2 different kinds of Asians, chinese and japanese. They were proud of their sophistication of not lumping all asians together.

hehe ... rip roaring hilarious scene!

ginthailand

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Re: (Revived) Latino Thread
« Reply #39 on: January 04, 2005, 09:57:14 AM »
I love that show.  Peggy's Spanish-language abilities are hilarious.  The episode where she's persuaded to testify in Spanish before a Mexican judge...classic.

"Laotian" comes from the French term "Laotienne", and considering the colonial experience, Lao people prefer to refer to their language and themselves simply as "Lao".