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Author Topic: Patent law related to science  (Read 1413 times)

quarter

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Patent law related to science
« on: December 17, 2002, 09:21:46 PM »
I am really interested in patent law related to science/genetics. I go to UW-Madison majoring in molecular biology and have a 3.56gpa. What schools could I get into? What schools are good for my interest?

Pun

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Re: Patent law related to science
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2002, 10:46:12 AM »
Hey,

I majored in the same thing; their is no patent law in science program per say; however, some schools offers course in Intellectual property and genetics, bioethics, health law and so forth. To my knowledge the following schools offer good patent law programs with science: Boston, Cardozo, Minnesota, Kent.

Also, in order to be a patent lawyer (litigator) you need to pass a patent agent exam. The failure rate is very high and generally a patent agent has a PHD or ath the very least a Master's in the related science field. Please do you research their are alot of oppurtunities for a scientist in law. Anyhow, do some reading in the legal field before you committ yourself to a career as a patent lawyer. The process is not that easy and the time commitment is hell.

rogerkell

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Re: Patent law related to science
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2002, 12:31:21 PM »
my dad is a patent attorney and I asked him about it.  Because of the location of the Patent Office in Arlington, VA, a few of the DC schools have good patent courses.  Look at GW, Georgetown and Goerge Mason.

Both patent agents and patent attorneys need to take the patent agents exam.  It is very hard to pass without some practical experience so figure on interning somewhere during the process.  The exam is only given 1 or 2 times per year.

Patent agents can practice before the patent office and the  patent appeals board but can't go to court.  Patent attorneys can.  Firms and corporations rather hire patent attorneys.  There is also a great difference in their salaries.

Good luck.

mischni

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Re: Patent law related to science
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2004, 10:52:47 AM »
I am a patent agent who will be attending law school next fall, so regarding patent law, I know from experience.

Generally law schools do no teach you patent law (although you can take IP classes, including patent law).  You learn it on the job.

Yes, you have to take the "patent bar" exam, and yes it has a low pass rate, but it is not too difficult as long as you study and are prepared.  My guess is it is no harder than a regular bar exam, which as future lawyers we will all have to pass.

It is also true that most patent agents or attorneys in the biotech field have PhD's, or at least a masters, but that is not true for all technologies (in fact biotech is really the only one that applies).  I have a bachelors in Chemical Engineering, and I have been very comfortable in chemical, mechanical, basic electrical, structural, and computer software cases.

prelaw_undergrad

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Re: Patent law related to science
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2004, 07:19:45 PM »
From what I've read, and please don't bite my ass if I'm wrong, Boalt Hall has one of the best IP programs in the nation, and it is a tier one school. 

I'd recommend looking up "Intellectual property law school" in google to see what pops up.  I did a search like that and discovered that Franklin Pierce, Marquette University, and John Marshall also have IP programs.