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Author Topic: Predict the Scale  (Read 1951 times)

24601

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2004, 10:37:36 AM »
Are you sure? I thought experimentals were given to try out new questions that  could possibly appear (in similar form but obviously different q) in the future and that this was determined by seeing if the CURVE for a particular experimental question/section was typical of the test's curve...

Everything I've heard has led me to believe that the curve is decided beforehand.

calibos11

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2004, 10:38:57 AM »
The sample of test takers should not affect the curve.  The curve is decided before the test is given.  That is why they have experimental sections. 

I didn't take the test, so I can't opine about the curve.

The experimental sections are solely for the purpose of determining whether those sections are appropriate for future exams...that's it. The curve is determined by the performance of the testtakers on that exam--it has nothing to do with experimentals.

Praetor

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2004, 10:44:52 AM »
How can they pick the scale beforehand and maintain the validity of 'such and such scaled score is such and such percentile'?

Xaviermba2003

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2004, 11:06:28 AM »
I don't know if this is true, but I've read that each LSAT exam derives its scale from the past three years of data.  That means the December exam was averaged in with 11 other LSATs - IF TRUE.

24601

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #24 on: December 05, 2004, 11:42:59 AM »
How can they pick the scale beforehand and maintain the validity of 'such and such scaled score is such and such percentile'?

How can they maintain percentile equivalence between tests if they only curve you against the people with whom you take the test?

They see how difficult the questions are by giving them to test takers as experimentals and then they use those peoples' percentiles on those questions to determine the scale.  Or, at least, so I have been led to believe.

Praetor

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #25 on: December 05, 2004, 11:44:51 AM »
How can they pick the scale beforehand and maintain the validity of 'such and such scaled score is such and such percentile'?

How can they maintain percentile equivalence between tests if they only curve you against the people with whom you take the test?

They see how difficult the questions are by giving them to test takers as experimentals and then they use those peoples' percentiles on those questions to determine the scale.  Or, atleast, so I have been led to believe.

Hmmmm, so then the question is how did people do with these as experimentals in years past :(

SanchoPanzo

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #26 on: December 05, 2004, 12:13:16 PM »
How can they pick the scale beforehand and maintain the validity of 'such and such scaled score is such and such percentile'?

How can they maintain percentile equivalence between tests if they only curve you against the people with whom you take the test?

They see how difficult the questions are by giving them to test takers as experimentals and then they use those peoples' percentiles on those questions to determine the scale.  Or, at least, so I have been led to believe.

Yes. I read something similar. However, it may be more complicated. From what I read (can't remember where) the percentiles should be comparable to one of the '96 tests (can't remember which one). But the implication is that if I compare my score to someone who took the LSAT in say 1997, we should have scores that are comparable for the level of difficulty of the exam. If this is correct, only looking back 3 years may skew the comparison depending on how test tankers are fairing. Ultimately, I believe the goal is to have scores that the adcoms can compare. That means a 180 on the october 2004 exam should be the same as a 180 on the october 2000 exam. Otherwise the adcoms are comparing apples and oranges. Of course, this is difficult to achieve in reality. However, I'm assuming that L-Sac is doing whatever it can to ensure this comparison is as reliable as possible.
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hocuspocus

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #27 on: December 06, 2004, 10:11:18 AM »
89=170 is about right.

October curve was insane, so i dont think it will be repeated.  However, I do think it will be a harsh curve.  One point less harsh sounds just about perfect.
Agreed.  Either 89 or 90 for 170.

chipmonkee

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #28 on: December 06, 2004, 10:16:29 AM »
Wouldn't it be nice though if we get a curve that isn't harse?  Wouldn't it make for a great Christmas and even better New Year?  Here's hoping!!

WitterUin4

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Re: Predict the Scale
« Reply #29 on: December 06, 2004, 10:34:11 AM »
Wouldn't it be nice though if we get a curve that isn't harse?  Wouldn't it make for a great Christmas and even better New Year?  Here's hoping!!
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