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Author Topic: the age issue (yet again)  (Read 2678 times)

ttiwed

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the age issue (yet again)
« on: April 15, 2004, 11:47:57 PM »
i've read that some law schools favor older, more mature students who have gained some real work experience before entering law school. For instance, the vast majority of students at northwestern have had some time between undergrad and law school and the university of wisconsin site said "We [the law school] have some evidence that applicants at least a year out of college...will have a better academic record in law school than their numerical credentials suggest. The post-college experience, whether in work or volunteer activity, may be a favorable factor [in admissions]." furthermore, i remember another school saying that students with WE tend to be more motivated.

correct me if i'm wrong (and i probably am), but my impression is that the students who go straight into law school are the ones who are more motivated. they are the ones who knew from the beginning that they wanted to go to law school and planned ahead for the lsat whereas a lot of the "working before law school" types are the ones who are going to law school to escape the troubled economy or going by default because they are unsatisfied with their current job. what are your guys' takes on this?

by the way, this is by no means meant to be an insult to older students. i too am working for a year before going to law school  ;).

thechoson

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2004, 11:49:24 PM »
Both arguments are valid and thus why they cancel each other out.  That's why law schools are so heavy on quantitative factors in deciding their students.

ajlynnette

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2004, 01:56:38 AM »
well, you know, these days i'm not so sure if i'd stick to that mode of thinking anymore. there are so many avenues for young students to take nowadays so i'd come to the conclusion that those students who come right outa undergrad and want to go straight into a grad program might not want to really be what it is they think they want to be.

i base this off of the recent boom of the MBA or just grad studies in general. i see more articles and supposed 'experts' telling people/students alike to go after that masters or JD or whatever grad degree now because it's as if they're turning that graduate level degree into the new bachelor's as if to say 'these days and into the future, the bachelor's is not or won't be enough.' that's what i'm seeing lately. so i can kinda understand why more schools are looking for those w/some work experience. i think it really gives new grads a chance to REALLY see if this is the field they want to go into or not. case in point? myself.

i totally thought i wanted to go into medicine, microbiology or immunology because i loved studying those topics in undergrad. well, i got to work for abbott labs in the micro dept. and found out RATHER quickly that those kind of jobs were NOT for me. i needed to feel like i was actually contributing something to a community. this is when health law started to come into play. when i got a job at a law firm as an admin asst? it totally showed me that this was where i needed to find a way to incorporate my science training. and now look at my options! :) so although both pathways are equally plausible options, i think it depends ultimately on the person.

just my thoughts...and no offense taken. ;)

xrayspec

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2004, 02:29:26 AM »
Believe me, if you have a mortgage and/or family when you enter law school, you are more motivated.

forthguy

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2004, 02:59:17 AM »
i've read that some law schools favor older, more mature students who have gained some real work experience before entering law school. For instance, the vast majority of students at northwestern have had some time between undergrad and law school and the university of wisconsin site said "We [the law school] have some evidence that applicants at least a year out of college...will have a better academic record in law school than their numerical credentials suggest. The post-college experience, whether in work or volunteer activity, may be a favorable factor [in admissions]." furthermore, i remember another school saying that students with WE tend to be more motivated.

correct me if i'm wrong (and i probably am), but my impression is that the students who go straight into law school are the ones who are more motivated. they are the ones who knew from the beginning that they wanted to go to law school and planned ahead for the lsat whereas a lot of the "working before law school" types are the ones who are going to law school to escape the troubled economy or going by default because they are unsatisfied with their current job. what are your guys' takes on this?

Interesting.

I'd suggest that most students who go straight from undergrad to law school do less because they "knew from the beginning" than because they're about to leave the friendly cocoon of school, likely with a tough-to-market degree, and they've got to find something new to either keep them in school or to help them become marketable.  I'd argue they're the ones more in need of "[escaping] the troubled economy."  The huge number of applications would seem to support that.  The huge number of depressed lawyers would suggest that most people who enter the profession have no idea what they're doing.

Those of us who have been working (for me, just over 10 years) for some time tend to have a much better idea of what we want, what's out there, and what we think we'd like to do.  I like my job enough that I have no intention of leaving it for law school; I'll only be going part-time.  Hopefully at the end, I'll be able to join the legal staff at my employer. If not, we'll see what else happens.  Worst case, I keep the job.  But because I feel like I'm ready for a career change, I'm plenty motivated to do well, even if I've got a great job that will continue to be there.

Quote
by the way, this is by no means meant to be an insult to older students. i too am working for a year before going to law school  ;).

A whole year, eh?  You sure that won't kill your motivation? :)

Greg

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2004, 08:53:05 AM »
I was actually told not to go right into law school by almost every lawyer I asked, including my father and uncle. Each of them worked in a field and then went to law school specializing in that field and that's what I plan to do. When I was in grad school, I was basically the only person that went directly from undergrad into grad school (at least at my school) and I think law school is pretty much the same. people want to get out and make some money and experience what it is like to actually put these skills to work.  Although I always had a feeling I was going to LS, I wasn't sure I wanted to spend the money (especially looking at starting salaries that most law schools report)  But, I know what I want now and have real world experience to assure me.  So that's my take...everybody's life path is different. If you are motivated, anything is possible for anyone!

jgruber

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2004, 10:27:09 AM »
I'm almost the oldest person on this forum and most of you are younger than my children.

I am more motivated about law school than I ever could have been right out of undergraduate school or a year after or ten years after.  Perhaps even as motivated as some others on this forum.   :)

And my 49 years have taught me that age is no guarantee of maturity.  I've dealt with too many adolescents in middle aged bodies to make any assumptions in that area.

My point?  I dunno.  It's Friday and I'm bored out of my brain and can't wait for LS to start in August so I had to get on my high horse (whoah) and spout.

 ::)

jgruber

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2004, 10:28:43 AM »
If you are motivated, anything is possible for anyone!

That's what I was trying to say!   :)

dsong02

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2004, 10:53:43 AM »
the hardest studying i ever did was for the lsats.  i never studied in high school.  i got lucky and did well and went to a good college, but i never studied in college either (its amazing how i didnt flunk out...im living proof that kissing ass works!).  but for those damn lsats...i (excuse the cliche) put my nose to the grindstone and made myself study harder than ever. 

my motivation?  my wife promised me that i could play poker regularly if i got into a good law school.    ;D

ok...that was a side perk.  true motivation came from the fact that i finally know what i want to do in life.  took me a while, but i did it.  when you finally know, motivation isnt a factor anymore...thats when determination and dedication comes into play. 

i think its the second time in my life that i was ever SURE of anything...the first was when i married my wife.

if i wanted to escape from the downward spiral of the economy, id sell drugs.  if i was unsatisfied with my current job, id leave, try to find another job, and when i couldnt, id sell drugs. 

but i think my better option is to go to law school :)
'why does it hurt so much when i poke it?'

jgruber

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Re: the age issue (yet again)
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2004, 11:02:16 AM »
if i wanted to escape from the downward spiral of the economy, id sell drugs.  if i was unsatisfied with my current job, id leave, try to find another job, and when i couldnt, id sell drugs. 

but i think my better option is to go to law school :)


Or at least finish law school before selling drugs.   :D