Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Puerto Rican applicants  (Read 895 times)

athenanyc

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Puerto Rican applicants
« on: December 01, 2004, 12:12:44 PM »
Hello,
This is my first post so bear with me if it's a repeat!

Why is there a distinction in the admissions process between "mainland" Puerto Ricans and Puerto Ricans from the island?  Why are mainland Puerto Ricans considered more disadvantaged?  My family is from NYC, but when they were in Puerto Rico they were even worse off.

I'm just curious.

Macul

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 76
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Puerto Rican applicants
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2004, 02:13:28 AM »
hey, since nobody else jumped in...
first of all, I am not sure why you think because they make a distinction that ad coms consider one more disadvantaged than the other.  I don't think that is the automatic assumption.  But look at www.lsac.org's online guide to law schools and look at the lsat ranges for the three law schools in puerto rico.  You will notice that even at the upi in san juan the scores are pretty darn low.  That is because to get accepted you have to take the equivalent of the gre's in spanish and those more likely are what admissions decisions are based on.  Classes are also taught in spanish (books in english).  You will also notice that none of the schools are ranked by US News and World reports.  Chances are that those coming from families like yours who grew up in puerto rico, went to high school and college in puerto rico and are still in puerto rico are NOT applying to law schools in the states.  There are excellent schools there that cost next to nothing. Those from the mainland who are applying (who probably attended the elite private schools, went to top colleges in the U.S., and come from relative wealth) are not likely to be considered "disadvantaged" by ad coms reading their applications