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Author Topic: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?  (Read 2933 times)

jeflord

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Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« on: November 30, 2004, 09:05:36 PM »
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Matokah

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2004, 12:08:09 AM »
I have a dissociative disorder that I also didn't disclose which might've played a factor in my LSAT (I got a 156), but I highly doubt it.  I have a lovely history of crappy standardized test scores.

As for affecting law school, I don't think my "problem" will.  I've done well in undergrad, and I feel comfortable under enormous amounts of stress.

Bipolar might be a difference experience, though. . .if you have to take meds that make you jittery or sluggish, that might be something you need to take into account.  I'm still not a big fan of how much mental health issues feel like they have some sort of stigma attached.  While I'm not ashamed of my situation, I didn't mention it in my applications because none of them asked.  If that's the kind of thing I should've mentioned in my personal statement for overcoming adversity, too bad.  :P
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Casper

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2004, 12:16:50 AM »
If you have a history of drug/alcohol abuse, you might what to stay away from the crowd.  Law school, compared to other higher education, has a larger number of students who are addicted to alcohol/drugs.  Students might invite you to bar afte class for a drink, etc. 
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writter

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2004, 02:44:06 AM »
I don't see how bipolar disorder would affect your LSAT score one way or the other.  I've been mildly depressed for about 2 years now and I still got a 172.  No matter how low I feel I can still diagram a game correctly.

Also, bipolar + low LSAT probably means that you shouldn't go to law school.

UMHBmom

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2004, 01:04:19 PM »
I don't see how bipolar disorder would affect your LSAT score one way or the other.  I've been mildly depressed for about 2 years now and I still got a 172.  No matter how low I feel I can still diagram a game correctly.

Also, bipolar + low LSAT probably means that you shouldn't go to law school.

Ooof... that was mean. And inaccurate. Being able to diagram a game has no correlation to the practice of law when you obviously lack empathy or people skills. Perhaps you should rethink law school yourself :-\

Now that Mommy got that out of her system, to the OP:
The only place it might have an impact is on the Bar. I was going over the Texas State app for the Bar, and they do ask for disclosure of all mental health-related hospitalizations and/or psychiatric treatment. This affected me because I had a pregnancy-related psychosis when I was pregnant with my 3rd child and wound up hospitalized for the last 2 months of pregnancy. Anyhoo.... it turns out it won't affect me because they ask for disclosure for the past 10 years, and it will have been 11 by the time I apply for the Bar. I'm sure they can't discriminate against you because of your illness, but they may request a hearing to determine your competency. Check with the Bar in the state you hope to attend school/practice.

writter

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2004, 01:06:05 PM »
Ooof... that was mean. And inaccurate. Being able to diagram a game has no correlation to the practice of law when you obviously lack empathy or people skills. Perhaps you should rethink law school yourself :-\

I am rethinking law school.

UMHBmom

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2004, 01:09:18 PM »
That, or consider Welbutrin. Makes me love everybody.  ;D

Junglelnd

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2004, 01:10:39 PM »
I don't see how bipolar disorder would affect your LSAT score one way or the other.  I've been mildly depressed for about 2 years now and I still got a 172.  No matter how low I feel I can still diagram a game correctly.

Also, bipolar + low LSAT probably means that you shouldn't go to law school.

The poster noted that it was the meds not bipolar that affected his performance.  In truth the meds you take for bipolar whether it be depakote, lithium, or whatever tend to slow you down, but regardless you can still be incredibly succesful.

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writter

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2004, 01:12:39 PM »
I stand corrected.

UMHBmom

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Re: Bipolar Disorder - How will it impact you in Law School?
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2004, 01:14:43 PM »
I don't see how bipolar disorder would affect your LSAT score one way or the other.  I've been mildly depressed for about 2 years now and I still got a 172.  No matter how low I feel I can still diagram a game correctly.

Also, bipolar + low LSAT probably means that you shouldn't go to law school.

The poster noted that it was the meds not bipolar that affected his performance.  In truth the meds you take for bipolar whether it be depakote, lithium, or whatever tend to slow you down, but regardless you can still be incredibly succesful.



And even "slowed down" according to the OP may be faster than your average bear. That is the nature of mania, after all.