Law School Discussion

What happens when you cancel a score

What happens when you cancel a score
« on: April 13, 2004, 12:06:21 PM »
Hey guys I have a few quick questions.  What happens when you cancel your score?  Does it show up on your LSDAS report...I assume it does.  How much does that hurt you, if at all?  Is that something used as a tie breaker between two otherwise equally qualified candidates, or do they look at that from the get go?

Also, what happens to your GPA when they convert it...does everybody's drop, or does it just depend on whether you were on qtrs or semesters?  I went to two qtr schools.

Sorry for all of the questions, but I would appreciate any feedback 

nathanielmark

Re: What happens when you cancel a score
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2004, 01:29:26 PM »
THey will show that you took an LSAT and cancelled. Unless you had a family emergency or some other valid reason for a subpar performance, its better to just take your lumps.

Re: What happens when you cancel a score
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2004, 01:39:09 PM »
Thanks, I figured that it would appear.  These are just all the questions I am considering when trying to decide if June or October is for me.  By my progress so far, I think June will work fine.  besides I don't want to "study" until October Thank again

NerdyLaw

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Re: What happens when you cancel a score
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2004, 02:05:35 PM »
I'm not so sure that it would be detrimental to your application if you cancel your score. How could they know why you cancelled? You could just add an adendum to your app stating that you DID cancel your score but it was due to a family emergency, or explosive diarrhea, or some such event.

Re: What happens when you cancel a score
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2004, 01:09:05 PM »
I canceled my score the first time I took the LSAT and I don't think it hurt my chances with admissions at all.  According to Testmasters schools don't care about one canceled score.  They only become worried after you have canceled multiple times.  BTW, I did not include an addendum explaining my cancel either.

By all means, if you believe you have performed poorly then cancel your score.  I am confident that if I hadn't canceled my initial score would have been in the mid-to-high 150's; effectively keeping me out of tier 1 law schools.  I took the test again and felt much better about how it went and scored a 164.  Now I get to go to a top 25 law school.  I implore all of you NOT to "take your lumps". 

ttiwed

Re: What happens when you cancel a score
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2004, 05:04:59 PM »
DO NOT "take your lumps." a bad lsat score will haunt you for 5 years. only one cancel on your record won't hurt you at all. as a matter of fact, i heard from a princeton review instructor that 60% of test takers canceled their score the first time taking the test. it is only when you cancel the score more than once that admissions committees may use this factor as a tiebreaker between equally qualified candidates.

Re: What happens when you cancel a score
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2004, 06:01:48 PM »
Thanks for the input guys!

zpops

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Re: What happens when you cancel a score
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2004, 06:08:47 PM »
I agree with everyone that you should cancel your score if you think you did poorly, but don't be too quick to cancel.  Almost every one of my friends who has taken the test has been tempted to cancel, even when they've actually ended up with scores in the high 160's!  It's easy to pick the test apart in your mind as time goes by, and before long just about anyone may end up thinking they did horribly.  The decision to cancel has to be approached calmly and rationally.  Of course, it's obvious you would cancel if there was some sort of problem during the test, like the dreaded marching band practicing in the next room!  I actually had that happen during a practice test, LOL!

For the GPA, not everyone's goes down.  I've seen gpa's that went up on lawschoolnumbers and mine actually stayed exactly the same by an odd coincidence.