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Author Topic: What are the "T1" schools?  (Read 4804 times)

Hocine

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What are the "T1" schools?
« on: November 21, 2004, 06:46:34 AM »
I keep seeing people refer to "T1" as a bunch of generally good schools, but I can't find an actual list of them anywhere. 

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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2004, 06:54:02 AM »
tier 1, aka top 50 schools.

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Hocine

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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2004, 01:56:20 PM »
Oh, but that's a lot!

If it was for undergrad that would be a pretty impressive list, but there are only about a quarter thousand law schools anyway right?

ghostpirate

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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2004, 04:02:02 PM »
Sure, but a much larger fraction of undergrad applicants make it into SOME college than make it into SOME law school, which is even more significant considering law school applicants are to some extent a self-selected bunch.

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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2004, 04:13:02 PM »
yes, what ghostpirate said.

and there are 187 ABA-accredited law schools right now, though a couple are expected to be added to the mix shortly (esp ave maria law school).

is there an easy way to see how many students are 1L's at the top 50 vs. the other 137?  i would venture a guess that it's proportionally less than 50/187.  and that would make it even more impressive to go to a tier 1 school.

in your original post, you said tier 1 is referred to as "a bunch of generally good schools."  that's still true.  but when people talk about the "top" schools, it's either the top half of the top tier (i.e., the top 25, which is what montauk uses in his book "how to get into the top law schools") or the coveted top 14.
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lawboundFALL05

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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2004, 09:31:20 AM »

is there an easy way to see how many students are 1L's at the top 50 vs. the other 137?  i would venture a guess that it's proportionally less than 50/187.  and that would make it even more impressive to go to a tier 1 school.


That is a very interesting thought, pookie.  I also began to think about the fact that a good amount of T1 schools have limited class sizes.  Yale, Penn, and Duke have b/t 120-220 students per class.  However, the fact that Harvard and G-Town have larger classes (600-900) may throw this factor out the window after the pencil is dull and the math is added up.

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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2004, 12:46:39 PM »

is there an easy way to see how many students are 1L's at the top 50 vs. the other 137?  i would venture a guess that it's proportionally less than 50/187.  and that would make it even more impressive to go to a tier 1 school.


That is a very interesting thought, pookie.  I also began to think about the fact that a good amount of T1 schools have limited class sizes.  Yale, Penn, and Duke have b/t 120-220 students per class.  However, the fact that Harvard and G-Town have larger classes (600-900) may throw this factor out the window after the pencil is dull and the math is added up.

yes, i was thinking the same thing.  BUT, you have harvard and gtown at the big end, yale, stanford, penn, and USC (you didn't list that one, but it's also around 220 or so) at the small end, and the average will be something in the middle.  but i think the overall average at the other schools might still be larger.

if i get super bored at work, i will add them all up.  after googling to see if someone else has already done the math.  ;)
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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2004, 01:47:21 PM »
You know how some people say "I call bull"?

Well, in this case, I call robot.  I can only think of one being that would replace 250 with "a quarter thousand."  That would be a robot, following some program to use humanoid word substitutions. 


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Hocine

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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2004, 01:53:57 PM »
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MidtownZackATL

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Re: What are the "T1" schools?
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2004, 03:59:32 PM »
Total enrollment at the T14 schools, according to the Princeton Review website, is 13,895.

Remove Georgetown from the list (it's last in the ranking and has many part-timers) and the number is 11,902. 

I'm not exactly sure how to find out the total number of American law school students, so I approximated based on lsat for the past three years.

Assume the average number of LSAT test-takers for 2001-2003 is 99k.  Therefore, in those three years 297k people took the LSAT.

Now divide that number in half to calculate out the number of people who didn't go to law school.  Remember that half scored below 150, and though some of those went, I am assuming that the number of people who scored above 150 that did not enroll at a law school compensates.

Now the number is 148,500 students enrolled in law school.

That means that 9.35% of students are in the T14.

Factor out Georgetown, and the number is 8.01%

Factor out Duke, Cornell, Northwestern, and (dare I say it?) Boalt (the schools that don't consistently rank in the top 10), and the number is 9,003 students.  The percentage is 6.06%.

Now, to answer the question of proportionality...

14/187= 7.48%

13/187= 6.95%

 9/187= 4.81%

The percentage of students in the T14 is proportionally greater.  These are based on rough estimations, and I'm not a math guy, so tear my calculations apart if you like.  Schools like Harvard, Georgetown, Columbia, NYU, UM, and UVA all bend the scale.

And finally...for you Pookie...

Yale represents 0.4% of American law students; this is proportionally smaller than 1/187 which is 0.53%

It's amazing what can be accomplished between classes.
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