Law School Discussion

Random question

Random question
« on: April 11, 2004, 06:19:39 PM »
Why do they have non-ABA schools if they can't sit for the Bar (unless there are special circumstances)?  That always puzzled me :)

Sorry if its a stupid question lol

Re: Random question
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2004, 06:31:04 PM »
Some states don't require that you go to an ABA accredited school to sit for the bar.  It varies from state to state.

cc1t

Re: Random question
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2004, 06:31:46 PM »
Some schools have special exception where they can sit for certain state's bars even though they are not accreditted (There is a user on here that is going to Nashville School of Law that is in that situation that can give more info).  While other schools are trying to get accreditted and entice students by ensuring they should be acredited by graduation  (See Barry University in Orlando, FL that just BARLEY became acredited (sp?) - it had failed numerous times, and if it didn't get accreditd then it would have to close down due to lack of funds, and pending law suits from pissed off alum that couldn't sit for the bar unlike what they were told in admissions, ironically one of my undergraduate professors at a state university is the dean their now, go figure, he was good though)

SpeakerDave

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Re: Random question
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2004, 08:59:16 PM »
The non-ABA accredited schools tend to accept a lot of money from students who then have limited-use degrees and historically low bar passage rates. 

If you read this board, you know how important posters think it is to go to the highest ranked school you can.  Well, a non-ABA school isn't even in the top 186 (is this the right number now?).  Thus, as they say, if go to a non-aba school you're sure to get a job hanging a shingle.  To expand, you're chances of passing the bar are dismal, and if you do, you have ot compete with the ABA school graduates. 

My advice is to go to a long standing ABA school. 


blizzard of ozz

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Re: Random question
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2004, 09:59:44 AM »
Why do they have non-ABA schools if they can't sit for the Bar (unless there are special circumstances)?  That always puzzled me :)

Sorry if its a stupid question lol

It's mainly a California thing (something like half their schools are non-ABA). Apparently in some states they'll let pretty much anyone sit for the bar, so these states have a ton of non-ABA (for-profit) schools. It's not like most of these people pass though.

Re: Random question
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2004, 10:39:00 AM »
im going to an ABA accredited school but i was just curious as to why :)  thanks though!

Re: Random question
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2004, 11:20:07 AM »
They do exist...but this does not mean it's a good idea to go to one.

jgruber

Re: Random question
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2004, 07:51:02 AM »
I'm going to a non-ABA school in Tennessee, because my situation limits my choices.

Can't move and can't quit the day job.

In Tennessee there are four law schools.  Memphis (too far) UT Knoxville (too far) Vanderbilt (costs too much) and Nashville School of Law (night school and inexpensive)

NSOL graduates are approved to take the bar exam in Tennessee.

Going to a non aba school limits my career choices, but at 49 I can have learned to live with limited choices.

 8)

jgruber

Re: Random question
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2004, 07:56:23 AM »
The non-ABA accredited schools tend to accept a lot of money from students who then have limited-use degrees and historically low bar passage rates. 

If you read this board, you know how important posters think it is to go to the highest ranked school you can.  Well, a non-ABA school isn't even in the top 186 (is this the right number now?).  Thus, as they say, if go to a non-aba school you're sure to get a job hanging a shingle.  To expand, you're chances of passing the bar are dismal, and if you do, you have ot compete with the ABA school graduates. 

My advice is to go to a long standing ABA school. 



Don't generalize, please.  Nashville School of Law costs are low -- 3900.00 a year (four year program) and has a bar exam pass rate of 71%.  Not fantastic, but certainly good enough to justify the expenditure of less than 16,000.00 tuition.

Non-ABA schools do not appear in law school rankings, because the rankings are only for ABA schools.  If they did include them, who knows where they would rank.  Hell, NSOL is the fourth ranked law school in Tennessee.   :D


But if things were different, I definitely would try to go to an ABA approved school, if for no other reason than it makes it easier to move a practice to other states.  If you have a choice go to a school with the ABA seal of approval.