Law School Discussion

Real Estate Law

PresClay_00

Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2005, 10:20:09 AM »
i think it's fairly easy to get into, as property is pretty standard for study.  the hands on experience is very necessary though, as the rules for deeds, recording, title insurance, etc vary from state to state and can be dramatically different.

F05HOPEFUL

Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2005, 12:55:30 PM »
i think it's fairly easy to get into, as property is pretty standard for study.  the hands on experience is very necessary though, as the rules for deeds, recording, title insurance, etc vary from state to state and can be dramatically different.

This is very true.  The procedure varies wildly among states.  It is very easy to break into, however it takes ALOT of marketing to really make it.  If you don't lick schmoozing people, this will not be a good path.  I surmise my firm spends about 1/3 of the attorneys time schmoozing clients.

PresClay_00

Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2005, 01:21:07 PM »
yeah, some of the attorneys i work with will readily tell you that they aren't practicing attorneys, but marketing guys who do some legal work.  my experience is almost wholly residential, but some of the people you have to deal with (realtors, mortgage brokers, lenders) are some of the most annoying people i have ever come in contact with (they are never wrong, everything operates on their schedule and even if they f*up, they convince the client it was the atty's office's fault) and has certainly turned me off from ever wanting to practice real estate law.  another factor that i think some RE attys face is that residential in some states is not a 9-6 or even 8-7 job, as people want to do closings at their house at night, on the weekends, etc and the attys don't feel they are being respected.  it's a valid argument, b/c your banker, dentist, doctor certainly aren't going to come to your house for routine business, but this is what RE has become in order to make money (at least in NC).

Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2005, 02:33:42 PM »
Does anyone know anything specific about the Atlanta and Florida real estate market?

Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2005, 05:16:28 PM »
bump

davisxa

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Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2005, 09:57:02 PM »
The real estate lawyers I work for work their asses off, bill at between $105 - $250/hr. and seem like generally miserable people. The market is the SF Bay Area. It's a 3-attorney office, so it seems like about half the work is the running-a-small-business headache type stuff. It completely baffles me why anybody would wake up one day and go, hmmm, I think I want to practice real estate law.

giffy

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Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2005, 10:02:42 PM »
The best RE lawyers I know or have heard over did not really make there money in law. They use it to larn the investment biz and to make contacts. They also made enough money to get started and know have sizable RE portfolios and are practically retired. RE can also be a good mainstay if you passion is seasonal. for example personally I want to do election law. Funny thing is that election law is only really practiced every 2-4 years. So I paln on doing RE in the off season at a firm that also does electino law.

F05HOPEFUL

Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2005, 06:02:37 PM »
The real estate lawyers I work for work their asses off, bill at between $105 - $250/hr. and seem like generally miserable people. The market is the SF Bay Area. It's a 3-attorney office, so it seems like about half the work is the running-a-small-business headache type stuff. It completely baffles me why anybody would wake up one day and go, hmmm, I think I want to practice real estate law.

Wow thats low $ in CA.  In GA they are billing about $450/hr and getting 60% cut of TI premiums, thats why it works to $750.

PresClay_00

Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2005, 06:08:30 PM »
some states don't allow attys to be involved with TI at all though if they are RE attys (NC for example), even though many are by way of their wife/father/etc.  is the 450 for a closing or for an hour of work?  most in NC charge by the closing and have a flat fee, but that also has to go for paralegals, searchers, etc which cuts into it considerably.  a lot of people think RE is easy, and it can be if you have someoen drumming up the business for you, but otherwise, it's a female dog.  also, i didn't leave work until 6:30 tonight b/c a damn lender couldn't get their act together to get us the docs in time, which meant the atty was doing an in home closing at 8 o'clock.

Re: Real Estate Law
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2005, 06:11:06 PM »
What is a TI premium?
 ???