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Author Topic: NYU v. Columbia  (Read 9196 times)

jaxon

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Re: NYU v. Columbia
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2004, 09:31:56 AM »
wow... that surprises me... but i have no idea how big the precints are.  i would still go to columbia. 


so i did a little research on these two neighborhoods, something a girl might want to know if deciding between the 2.....in 2004 there were 5 rapes reported in the precint where NYU is, down 37% from last year, in the precinct where columbia is, 20 rapes were reported up 150% from last year? just some facts and figuresnot saying columbia isn't safe, but the areas around it aren't the greatest, although u have to be careful anywhere u are in the city, i think i'm just biased b/c i always wanted to go to NYU!

PsychJK

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Re: NYU v. Columbia
« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2004, 08:20:24 AM »
draino visited both, and if memory serves preferred Columbia.  If you weed through old posts, you can find his detailed experience of both campuses (I'd do it, but I'm running late...)
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headlesschicken

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Re: NYU v. Columbia
« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2004, 07:57:50 PM »
The OP may have been referring to my posting somewhere else about why I'm much more interested in NYU than Columbia. In talking to people about law school, the impression I've gotten is that NYU is much more supportive of public service than Columbia. While Columbia has recently been trying to pump up their public service programs, they have nothing like the Root-Tilden-Kern program to bring in students committed to public service. As an undergrad, i knew a huge number of public interest people who went to NYU, and almost no one who went to Columbia. And at the public interest law firm where I work right now, we interview at NYU but not Colubmia. (It's a small firm, and our summer associates tend to come exclusively from Yale, Harvard, NYU, Stanford, and Berkeley.) For me, support for non-corporate work is the most important element of choosing a law school, so NYU is leaps and bounds ahead of Columbia. Plus, I think the village is way more interesting. Morningside Heights is fine, and I'm sure you'd be happy there, but the village is downtown and a hell of a lot of fun.

That said, Columbia is slightly more prestigious, primarily because of its history and Ivy League connections. I think the different in prestige might be a factor if you want to practice on the west (best) coast. In the same way that out here, most lawyers see no real difference in prestige between between berkeley and stanford but out east there's definitely a perceived distinction, west coast lawyers are more likely to be impressed by columbia than by nyu.
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S.J.

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Re: NYU v. Columbia
« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2004, 11:53:55 AM »

  Columbia has a better overall reputation, for the reasons noted above.  Columbia's reputation ratings have always been in the top five or six, while NYU has only fairly recently been consistently placing in the top 10. 

  However, NYU's actual faculty and student body have apparantly caught up to Columbia, and it seems like the placement office and adminstration generally make much more of an effort to serve the students and improve as an institution, being as they've always been in the shadow of Columbia. 

  Given NYU's preferable location (in my opinion), I'd have to visit both and see which one felt better.  All in all, though, I'd probably choose NYU.
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ats

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Re: NYU v. Columbia
« Reply #25 on: December 09, 2004, 11:24:35 AM »
Columbia having a better rep than NYU is somewhat misinformed. Any top 100 law firm will consider them essentially equal, mainly because Columbia has slipped academically in the last 10 years while NYU has climbed rapidly (due to some great administrators, professors and alumni, including the new President of Stanford Law School).

Depending on your 1L and 2L grades, both will land you equally good jobs on either coast, so you should visit and make your decision based on a) location, b) classmates, c) focus on the type of law you want to practice, d) faculty/atmosphere/etc (not necessarily in that order :P). Go to the law school where you will succeed - your grades will matter a lot more in finding work than the miniscule difference between NYU and Columbia prestige-wise (if any), and the your comfort level at the school will factor a lot more into your grades than any nebulous concept of prestige.

Of course, if you have a thing for going to an Ivy, by all means use that as your deciding factor.

S.J.

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Re: NYU v. Columbia
« Reply #26 on: December 09, 2004, 01:47:43 PM »
Columbia having a better rep than NYU is somewhat misinformed. Any top 100 law firm will consider them essentially equal, mainly because Columbia has slipped academically in the last 10 years while NYU has climbed rapidly (due to some great administrators, professors and alumni, including the new President of Stanford Law School).

Well, it's not exactly "misinformed".  Any review of the annual U.S.News Reputation surveys will show that Columbia consistenly has a lawyer/judge/academic rating around 4.6 or 4.7, while NYU usually has one around 4.4.  Translated into rankings, that usually places Columbia in the 4th or 5th spot, with NYU tied for 8th or 9th. 

However, I agree that among top firms today, hiring partners know enough to treat them as equals.  The student bodies at both are certainly comparable, as are the faculties.  (I wouldn't say that Columbia has slipped -- simply that NYU has improved considerably.)

Within firms, you still may impress other attorneys (especially older partners) slightly more with a Columbia degree, but I agree that both schools are generally comparable in terms of real quality.  As noted, I would probably prefer NYU overall myself, for the reasons stated.
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