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Author Topic: Professor's Salary at Top 5  (Read 892 times)

Laura

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Re: Professor's Salary at Top 5
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2004, 03:19:19 PM »
They really care whether or not you're physically in the office? 

dr_draino

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Re: Professor's Salary at Top 5
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2004, 03:28:46 PM »
Dunno, never worked at a big law firm.  But I'd be willing to bet that a significant portion of your work as a new associate HAS to be done at he office...either in the library, or document review of stuff that they eitehr woudn't want you to take out of the office or is a box so big you wouldn't want to bother trying to take it home with you.  I'm just making all of this up btw...

Laura

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Re: Professor's Salary at Top 5
« Reply #12 on: November 07, 2004, 03:32:40 PM »
Yeah, I know... your speculation is as good as mine, or better I'm sure.  You're probably right about not wanting to take it home with you too. 

I'm thinking I should read Double Billing and other new associate type books before I completely commit myself to this.

zeroaffinity

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Re: Professor's Salary at Top 5
« Reply #13 on: November 07, 2004, 04:34:02 PM »
State schools typically have to publish faculty salary. They do in Georgia anyway. Maybe you could check out a top public law school (Michigan?) and find some salary figures. I know we have a couple of professors that pull down +200k and they teach almost exclusively in the MBA program. I imagine salaries like that are pretty common in professional programs at top institutions.

And that doesn't include summer contracting/research. I found out one of my strategy profs went up to DC to do some summer work to the tune of $28k! That's a nice chunk of change.

superiorlobe

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Re: Professor's Salary at Top 5
« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2004, 04:39:52 PM »
From Leiter:

Starting salaries at law schools typically range anywhere from $60,000 to $130,000 depending on the caliber of the school and the location.  (Schools in the New York City area tend to pay the highest salaries, unsurprisingly.)  Many law schools also offer summer research grants on top of the base salary:  these can range anywhere from $3,000 to $15,000, depending on the school and its salary structure.  Most law schools also offer financial support for research, including student research assistants ($1,000-3,500 is the typical range) and discretionary funds for travel to conferences, purchase of books, and the like ($1,000-3,000 is again the range).  Some schools commit these monies up front in specific dollar terms; some schools leave it discretionary but assure you that it is available for productive people who need it.  Some discretionary schemes are quite reliable; however, you might ask faculty at the school how it works in practice.

http://www.utexas.edu/law/faculty/bleiter/GUIDE.HTM

kidblue

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Re: Professor's Salary at Top 5
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2004, 05:30:47 PM »
Here is a great website about professors' salaries:

http://www.saltlaw.org/salary.htm

It depend a lot on the school. At a small state school, it is pretty common to start around $70,000 and maybe get up to $180,000 or so as the dean of the school. Some schools, howere, pay much higher salaries. Top five school pay big salaries, partly because other schools will compete for their talent, and partly because they hire a lot of older professors who have already established themselves and worked up the pay scale at lesser schools.

kidblue

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Re: Professor's Salary at Top 5
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2004, 05:34:08 PM »
Oh yeah. It is probably worth noting that young professors are rareley recruited at several of the top five schools. There are some exeptions, but these schools tend to hire established names in the field. Also, Yale won't even hire professor out of law school any more. Most of their hires are already mid-career.