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Author Topic: MPP/MPA vs JD  (Read 4153 times)

corleone

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MPP/MPA vs JD
« on: April 06, 2004, 04:54:35 PM »


  Does anyone have any thoughts on this?  I was in debate for a long time which i was goin to do.  I finally decided that if i am going back to school i might as well go all the way and get the JD....

   Benefits of MPP/MPA over JD???
    "       "   JD    over MPP/MPA???
    any other thoughts on teh subject?

                 C.

lstudent

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Re: MPP/MPA vs JD
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2004, 05:18:09 PM »
Well, any position you can get with an MPA/MPP you can easily get with a JD, especially the adminstrator jobs.  Now, when you get to the theoretical and/or specialized, like city/rural planning, etc., maybe an MPA is better if you have a specific career in mind.  However, the JD is the best generalist degree you can get, and even though you may not pursue a conventional law career, a JD will put you in a position to travel miles ahead of where an MPA/MPP may take you...

A few years back I was considering an MPA, and looking towards Syracuse...

But, hands down, JD is the much better degree, especially if you have only vague notions of a career...

Hope this advice helps...

Also, there is the option of a JD/MPA, getting both, and taking 4 years...but the JD alone should prove sufficient...

drewpac

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Re: MPP/MPA vs JD
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2004, 05:28:01 PM »
I've been told that a JD is NOT a good generalist degree; that you should only go to law school if you want to practice law.  Your take is interesting because my fiance is planning on getting her MPA and she has no clue as to what she wants to do with it.  I told her that she should think about LS since she's done well on practice LSATs.

lstudent

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Re: MPP/MPA vs JD
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2004, 05:33:46 PM »
I have witnessed the versatility of the law degree; for example, an acquaintance of mine recently switched from one high paying career to another, unrelated, career that was also high paying. 

I am only saying, it will be easier to get into a variety of jobs, and perhaps you'll be taken a little bit more seriously, if  you have your JD...

This is especially pertinent if you do not necessarily know what career path you want...

This is only my humble opinion...

jas9999

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Re: MPP/MPA vs JD
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2004, 05:44:36 PM »
If you know you want to work in non-profit, an MPA is a good thing to have. My gf is finishing this year at NYU, and will have less loans from three years (one full time, two part time) than I will from one year of law school. She knows she wants to be an exec director of a non-profit at some point, and is working in fundraising/grant writing now. For either of these things, a law degree means nothing.

corleone

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Re: MPP/MPA vs JD
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2004, 05:50:50 PM »



 lstudent,

  some great stuff! Thanks!
            C.

Anti_Ivy

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Re: MPP/MPA vs JD
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2004, 05:53:49 PM »
I've been told that a JD is NOT a good generalist degree; that you should only go to law school if you want to practice law.

The reason a law degree is 'versatile' is because many employers view law school as the pinnacle of education.  I have spoken to many people who do not have J.D.'s who believe that law school is the hardest of all graduate schools to get into, and one of the hardest to graduate from.  I am not saying that a law degree is better than, say, a medical degree.  However, many employers know that law schools are very selective, and that only the top-notch applicants are accepted. For instance, when I asked the head of human resources of a major advertising firm which was more impressive, a J.D. or M.B.A, she told me that a person with a J.D. would have just as much a chance of being employed, if not a better chance, because it is easy to pay for an employee to attend business school part-time.  Also, she told me that the firm could teach a new employee what s/he does not know (due to the lack of a M.B.A).  She added that the advertising firm she worked for, like law schools, wants employees who can bring something new to the table.  So even if a law school graduate decides to go off and pursue something completely irrelevant to a J.D., s/he could still get a good job.

jgruber

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Re: MPP/MPA vs JD
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2004, 06:55:36 PM »
When I told my friend, who had graduated from Harvard LS 25 years ago, that I had been accepted to law school, he told me that I had already done the hardest part of becoming a lawyer.   :D

I guess getting into LS is widely seen as the hardest thing.   ;)


The reason a law degree is 'versatile' is because many employers view law school as the pinnacle of education.  I have spoken to many people who do not have J.D.'s who believe that law school is the hardest of all graduate schools to get into, and one of the hardest to graduate from. 

jrmadtown

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Re: MPP/MPA vs JD
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2004, 02:59:15 PM »
I'd have to agree.  I'm a non-practicing CPA and the hardest part of that is the exam.  Once you are a CPA, nobody can take it away from you (unless, of course, you're a crook) and employers understand that not everyone walking in off the street can go become one, at least without putting in some significant effort.

I look at the law degree the same way.  Even if later I decide not to practice law, it will still be a credit to me to have accomplished the JD and prospective employers in any field will appreciate that.

Also, unlike someone who stays in school for ten years and ends up with a PHD, I think a JD has less of a chance of making you look overeducated for non-related positions.
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