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Author Topic: MS/JD - what are the options?  (Read 582 times)

schoomp

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MS/JD - what are the options?
« on: April 06, 2004, 04:55:14 AM »
It seems that there are at least several other computer geeks on this board - so here are my questions:

If you have a Master's of Science and work experience in some field of computers (system administration, programming, database administration, etc), what are the best fields of law to go into?  For instance, it would seem that someone that knew about the basics of network security would be better equipped to handle some of the recent cases that have come up dealing with consumer's info being stolen from credit card databases.  Should one know something about several computer operating systems, it seems they would be better able to handle the cases that Microsoft has dealt with concerning monopolies.

Any ideas what areas to go into?  Also, any ideas how to get jobs doing those fields?  It appears the new legal areas that will be big are the areas going into computers - security, hacking, intellectual property involving programs, etc.  Will having an MS in the field help chances of getting those jobs?

I know you should go into law school because of love of the law, etc, etc, however when I graduate I am going to be in major debt, about ready to what to start a family, and needing to pay for all of it.  I would love to do other things on the side, but I know that honestly I am going to have to make a fairly good living just to pay for everything else.  Already knowing about computers, and enjoying *some* aspects of them (mostly the ones involving the what should have been done before the problem and why the company is liable for the problem), I figure this is the area to go into to satisfy both the debt issue, the interest issue, and the supporting self/family/taxes issue, but the question is, where can this knowledge be put to use?

Also, one last question, somewhat like the computer field, do you think these areas will be biased toward males?  I've seen in my years in the computer field that (and this is all my experience/opinion) that women have to "prove" themselves whereas men are more readily accepted as being qualified. Maybe this isn't true everywhere, but it seems to me, to be at least somewhat a problem..

jgruber

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Re: MS/JD - what are the options?
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2004, 09:37:17 AM »
Take this what it is worth, coming from a not yet law student and current computer programmer.  From what I can determine previous work experience and education will only affect your law practice where you decide to specialize.  In other words, if you take electives in those areas.  Your MS and experience will help of course in understanding the business that your legal practice touches, but I'm  not so sure it will give you any special insight to the legal aspects of that business.

If you specialize your legal education in the areas you've indicated, that specialization and your experience should appeal to clients and employers in that legal area, for no other reason that you'll be able to talk their language.

As a 19 year programmer, I'm ready for something new and do not plan to work in IT law.