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Author Topic: Weighing GPA vs. LSAT?  (Read 19602 times)

the scientist

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Re: Weighing GPA vs. LSAT?
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2005, 09:13:56 AM »
LSAT score is considered 3x more tha the under grad GPA so it seems foolish to underestimate th LSAT. This is probably the most important factor that contributes in determining which Law School you will attend.

twarga

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Re: Weighing GPA vs. LSAT?
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2005, 09:51:36 AM »
The official line I have heard is that admission committees weigh your GPA and LSAT equally.  However, after talking to several friends that are lawyers, they said if you have a strong LSAT and a average/weak GPA, then they want to know why you haven't applied yourself in college.  On the other hand, they said if you have a low LSAT and a high GPA then conditions are more favorable for admission.  Has anyone else have any information/thoughts on the matter?  I guess I am just trying to come to grips with how 4 years of work can be weighed equally with 4 hours of test.  I'd appreciate your input!

You have it absolutely backwards.  I had a cruddy 3.0 GPA but a good 166 and got into Rutgers-Camden, Temple, and Villanova.  People with higher GPAs but lower LSATs did not get in.  Check out lawschoolnumbers if you don't believe me.  The LSAT score is paramount!
http://www.lawschoolnumbers.com/display.php?user=twarga

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twarga

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Re: Weighing GPA vs. LSAT?
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2005, 11:41:18 AM »
Go to the "The Unthinkable just happened, now what?" thread to get an idea of what I mean.  That poor dude had a 3.8 and a 150 and didn't get in anywhere!  Your LSAT score drives the train, my friend.
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Nellbelle

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Re: Weighing GPA vs. LSAT?
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2005, 12:09:43 PM »
Just an FYI, If anyone is in the low LSAT/high GPA predicament. (But not looking for T1 or T2 schools. Stetson seems to really but quite a bit of weight on GPA. There are some people that even got merit scholarships having an LSAT in the upper 150's but a 3.8-4.0. Also, they have Spring, Summer and Fall admissions.
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ASNetlenov

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Re: Weighing GPA vs. LSAT?
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2005, 10:48:05 AM »
The LSAT is much more important than a GPA. Some schools, especially public ones, look favorably at GPA. The LSAT determines to which schools you should apply and your GPA determines whether you are accepted.

Look at it this way, you can have a 4.0 and a 157 and not get into schools that you might if you have a 2.8 and a 170. Look as LSN for verification, as another poster has suggested.

SleepyGuyYawn

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Re: Weighing GPA vs. LSAT?
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2005, 11:20:24 AM »
Haven't read the other posts here, so sorry if I repeat something.

I'm faily certain that at most schools the LSAT counts somewhat more than GPA.  It could be somewhat true that an admissions committee may wonder why an applicant w/ a low GPA didn't apply herself more as an undergrad.  But it's a lot better than an admissions committee having doubts about whether a law student can actually do the work.

A good GPA, especially at an undergrad school without a great reputation, is also seen as a matter of effort -- rather than intelligence -- by law school admissions committees.  Most law schools are less concerned about whether an applicant will do the work (students being prepared and doing homework isn't a big issue at most law schools) than whether they can.

Of course, this doesn't mean that an undergraduate record doesn't count -- far from it.  A record with difficult classes is especially helpful (and necessary at any top school).

If you're interested, the LSAC has formulas used by law schools to come up with admissions indexes. They're posted on the LSAC Online Services website (you have to sign in though).  It will prove what I'm saying, btw.