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Author Topic: GW vs GMU  (Read 2294 times)

little_old_lady

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2004, 07:11:10 PM »
Regarding the number of GMU attorneys at a prestigious IP firm, I'd want to know a few questions.  First, what were their backgrounds?  Do they have PhDs?  Second, when where they hired?  During the flush late 90's or more recently?  Third, how did they end up at the prestigious firm?  Did they clerk or lateral?  And last what was their class rank? 

I'll bet good money that the prestigious firm recruits at GMU but only takes candidates in the top 5-10% with a credible science background while that same firm will look people from GW at about 20% or so. 

Also I hear potential law students talk about IP law all the time and I'm not an IP person but my understanding of the market is that there was a time when very few engineers went to law school but now law schools have plenty of engineers.  You need more than an interest in IP law to do IP law.  Plus you're going to competing for those few jobs with people with PhDs from prestigious graduate schools. 

Revenant

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2004, 07:18:19 PM »
Yeah, I think for those with science backgrounds, a PhD is necessary nowadays.  Those with engineering backgrounds, I think an engineering degree will do.  At least that's how it looks from all the employee credentials at IP firms.

Regarding the number of GMU attorneys at a prestigious IP firm, I'd want to know a few questions.  First, what were their backgrounds?  Do they have PhDs?  Second, when where they hired?  During the flush late 90's or more recently?  Third, how did they end up at the prestigious firm?  Did they clerk or lateral?  And last what was their class rank? 

I'll bet good money that the prestigious firm recruits at GMU but only takes candidates in the top 5-10% with a credible science background while that same firm will look people from GW at about 20% or so. 

Also I hear potential law students talk about IP law all the time and I'm not an IP person but my understanding of the market is that there was a time when very few engineers went to law school but now law schools have plenty of engineers.  You need more than an interest in IP law to do IP law.  Plus you're going to competing for those few jobs with people with PhDs from prestigious graduate schools. 


Danny

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2004, 11:37:07 AM »
I don't know where the Georgetown grad who told me he regrets going there instead of GMU works, but I just went to the site of the biggest IP firm in DC, Finnegan Henderson (www.finnegan.com).  If you click on a search for their attorneys, you can search by law schools.  I search for GMU, they have fifteen alums working there.  I clicked on eight of the names, none had Ph.Ds, only one seemed to even have a Masters.  I have friends at GMU who are in the IP program, they are doing well but not in top ten percent, they aren't having any problems finding jobs.  I think there are plenty of jobs out there for IP lawyers.

little_old_lady

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2004, 12:26:34 PM »
When were they hired?  Was during the boom-time?  I recommend checking out the Greedy Associates IP board. 

Danny

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #14 on: April 04, 2004, 03:01:46 PM »
I didn't keep a running list, but I remember one of them was Class of 2003, and my current contacts at GMU don't have PhDs either.

little_old_lady

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2004, 03:45:46 PM »
But what is their class rank?  I'm not disputing that people from GMU can get into great firms in DC.  However, someone from GW will have a little bit more 'wiggle' room in terms of grades, journal participation and experience. 

The top grad at GMU (just like the top grad at every state school) is the luckiest guy/girl in the world.  They go anywhere, do anything and owe much less than everyone they're going to be competing against.  But the odds are against being number one in your class. 

So I always ask, what's it like for the average guy/girl?  And I'll bet it's a little bit easier for that hypothetical person at GW than GMU but it won't be easy for either one. 


Danny

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2004, 05:57:26 PM »
Assuming equivalent grades, a student from GW will do better in the job market in general than a student at GMU, but I'm not sure that's true of the patent program, because GMU has such a
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well-connected, intensive one http://www.gmu.edu/departments/law/ip/.  Of course all things aren't equal, student quality is a bit better at GW, so you can expect to do better at GMU.  Also, students with science/math backgrounds tend to do better at GMU than they do elsehwere, because the program is more rigorous and less liberal artsy than at other schools.

rcjackson

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2004, 07:40:47 PM »
Just a general impression related to your happiness there, which really should be a top priority, GWU is left of center, GMU is right of center.  GMU is also VERY male.  Very low female ratio.  The building, to me, also feels a little sterile.

nathanielmark

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #18 on: April 05, 2004, 11:20:26 AM »
Just a general impression related to your happiness there, which really should be a top priority, GWU is left of center, GMU is right of center.  GMU is also VERY male.  Very low female ratio.  The building, to me, also feels a little sterile.

Where do you get this info about the political leanings of the two institutions?  I was leaning towards GMU because of in-state tuition.  but i would prefer not to go to a conservative school.  i thought all law schools were generally pretty liberal?

does anyone know how the 2 compare in terms of their part time programs?  Is GMU more difficult?

little_old_lady

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Re: GW vs GMU
« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2004, 03:14:32 PM »
GMU is known as a very conservative law school in terms of its faculty.  Some of its faculty members are well known law and economics scholars.  The student body is probably more 'normal' since law students in general tend to be liberal.