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Author Topic: high GPA, bombed lsat  (Read 12282 times)

Runner

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Re: high GPA, bombed lsat
« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2004, 11:51:58 PM »
So much to say, and yet, I'll be as brief as possible.

I whipped myself into a frenzy studying for this test, and frankly, it hurt me on Test Day. I got a 151, even though I went through roughly 40 actual preptests. That was not a typo. I went through just about every preptest that exists and still scored dreadfully- well, I guess it could have been a wee bit worse.

But, the lesson I learned and that I would impart to future test-takers, is do the preparation, but if you work yourself too hard, you won't have your mojo with you on the one day that matters. If you get worked up enough, all the preparation in the world won't save you.

Most people would have a nervous breakdown after such an outcome. But, I didn't because I know what went wrong and why. My next stop is the GRE. Lesson learned.

Matthew_24_24

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Re: high GPA, bombed lsat
« Reply #21 on: November 14, 2004, 12:04:23 AM »
I dont think its because you necessarily took 40 preptests.  You probably were too anxious to perform adequately. 

Stress provides a benefit to your results up to a certain point, and then its all downhill from there. 

For an example of the curvilinear relationship:

No stress, no worries: LSAT 155
A little stress, but not very pumped up: 160
Concerned, but not overly anxious: 165
Majorly stressed over it: 160
Life of Death situation: 155

Whatever stress level you practice at, if you don't try and bring yourself down, you'll play the game at 1-2 levels higher.  These are gross approximations, but the curvilinear relationship between anxiety and performance is well documented in the literature.  Thus, if law school is your life's goal, I'd suggest really trying to psych yourself out of its importance, or go in sleepy or groggy to the point that you'd rather sleep.  Your natural endorphins will take care of the rest.

I went into the exam off of a full night's rest (which is unusual for me and tests) wound up like a cannonball.  I had been up since 3:30 am and I just outstressed myself to death. Consequently i scored 6 pts lower than i had on any practice test of my last 15. (164).  It was horrible lol. 

Matt

Runner

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Re: high GPA, bombed lsat
« Reply #22 on: November 15, 2004, 12:28:59 AM »
I am applying to a handful of mildly respectable schools- respectable in their own backyard, that is. They could probably all go either way in what will happen.

While I can't say for sure that I'll get admitted, I'm taking the GRE's just in case my law school plans completely implode. It does happen to some people.

People pursue a law degree for many different reasons. Some of them really want good paying jobs. Others just want to have a degree that will enable them to go into almost any profession- that is what a law degree is, in essence. But, one thing I have noticed that seems universal among this growing number of prospective applicants is that they have very little idea about what they will be doing after their legal education. They just assume that having the degree will make things fall into place. In some sense, law school for these people is becoming an extension of the undergraduate years, when things were just as foggy and lacking in concrete objectives.

This is the danger that law schools should be mindful of, as they look at an ever-increasing pool of applicants. If they want to preserve the prestige and distinction that a law degree affords, they must do one of the following:

1. Become more selective. Yes, that's right. Law schools might make it even harder to get in. Before we know it, the only legitimate contenders will be those who have 170 or above. Everyone else will just bring up the rear.

2. Increase the requirements for completing a law degree. If it takes more time to get a J.D., then fewer people will do it. One of the reasons that applications for Ph.D programs are not going through the roof in the same way they are for law schools is that getting a Ph.D usually takes 5 years or more.

3. Increase tuition rates. Cruel, to be sure. But, don't count it out.

There are many implications to consider as more and more people apply. With the increasing number of people entering this level of education, something has to change.

Matthew_24_24

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Re: high GPA, bombed lsat
« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2004, 04:41:16 AM »
Maybe for some.  I went back to university explicitly to go to law school.  Which is what I'm factoring in as to why i bombed my LSAT. Way too much pressure.

Matt

christylove

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Re: high GPA, bombed lsat
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2005, 05:28:05 PM »
One common theme seems to be the idea that standardized tests are a good indicator of performance in school.  That's a bunch of bunk and there's lots of evidence that supports that.  I too did well on the practice tests and only got a 148 on the actual exam.  I graduated college with a 2.99 GPA due to some extenuating circumstances, primarily during senior year, but managed to raise my graduate GPA to a 3.45. Despite the obvious vast improvement, admissions gurus at 12 universities thought I was too stupid to go to their law school. For those of you in the same boat, don't sweat it.  First of all, you can always retake the LSAT if the score is just that low.  Second, law schools really like to play the numbers game, despite evidence that their admissions indexes are useless in determining your future success, so don't shoot for the stars if your numbers aren't in line with your dream school's index.  You won't get in regardless of how many great recs you have or how extenuating your circumstances are.  Third, whenever the economy is in a slump and jobs are hard to find, people like to look toward higher education as a way to bide their time until they find a job.  If you really want to practice law, wait a few years, get some real world experience, and try again.  And finally, if you are worried that you won't get a good job if you "settle" for a school that's not in tiers one or two, think again.  I know several people that didn't even go to ABA accredited schools who are working at prestigious firms throughout the country.  There are a several good reasons to pick a less notable school.  I highly recommend reading "Law School Confidential" if you're serious about pursuing a career in law. It's very informative and more realistic about life after law school than any other book I've come across.  Anyway, good luck to everyone and don't take rejections personally.  If Harvard rejects you, you're likely better off at a school who respects your individual accomplishments and not their status quo.


I can so appreciate this post. I am not concerned with the image of Law School I just want to get in. As with any other program of study, after graduation you are going to have market yourself. When I graduated from nursing school nobody asked me what I school I went to, they just wanted to know if I could take care of my patients. Rank is overrated and very bias in my opinion. I also know lawyers that did not come from places like Harvard and Yale, and they are the top in thier fields. Example: Willie Gary (pi/med. mal), or Renee Rockwell (criminal) Willie told me that when he was growing up, he didn't even know what Harvard Univ. was. I agree with you 100%
ChristyLove