Law School Discussion

LSAT/IQ Conversion Table

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2004, 10:34:26 PM »
This topic has been discussed in the past on this site, here I find that thread,

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,1650.0.html

Yes, ad nauseum. I wish we could lay this thing to rest already. For those who enjoy beating a dead horse though, here's how to find SAT/IQ equivalencies:

1. Figure out what percentile for the general population a given SAT score represents.
2. Figure out what IQ score is indicated by that percentile.
3. Pair up the two.

It's not rocket science. You can do all sorts of fun conversions between SAT, IQ, and LSAT if you've got these three steps down and you've got some numbers to start with.

HTH

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #31 on: October 27, 2004, 11:58:59 PM »
The original table starting this thread is pretty correct. Sorry, zxcvbnm.

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2004, 12:06:38 AM »
The original table starting this thread is pretty correct. Sorry, zxcvbnm.

If you've got a more accurate way of correlating the two, I'd love to know. But those conversion look *way* off to me. I'm not going to simply accept them as legit because two people say they are. What's your source?

Hocine

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Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #33 on: October 28, 2004, 12:34:06 AM »
You can't realistically expect to find a way to convert between the two, there are too many confounders ...

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #34 on: October 28, 2004, 12:39:57 AM »
You can't realistically expect to find a way to convert between the two, there are too many confounders ...

Yeah, but it's fun. The correlation obviously isn't perfect, but it's relatively high. The LSAT correlates better with IQ tests than does any other standarized test most people take, and it correlates with IQ tests about as well as various IQ tests correlate with each other. That's good enough for some rough, ballpark conversions to be made. Now what the conversions actually *are* is a different story...

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #35 on: October 28, 2004, 08:36:31 PM »
Guys, I'm a member of Mensa with an I.Q. of 140, but I only scored 144 on the LSAT. I guess part of the problem is that I only took two practice tests before I took the real thing. But I belief we are comparing apples and oranges.

Bisquick

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Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #36 on: October 28, 2004, 08:37:53 PM »
Guys, I'm a member of Mensa with an I.Q. of 140, but I only scored 144 on the LSAT. I guess part of the problem is that I only took two practice tests before I took the real thing. But I belief we are comparing apples and oranges.

OUCH!

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #37 on: October 28, 2004, 11:31:28 PM »
Guys, I'm a member of Mensa with an I.Q. of 140, but I only scored 144 on the LSAT. I guess part of the problem is that I only took two practice tests before I took the real thing. But I belief we are comparing apples and oranges.

Yes, and clearly, unless a statistical conversion formula succeeds in predicting each and every result with pinpoint accuracy, it has zero validity. I mean, that is how statistical generalizations work, after all... right?

Hocine

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Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #38 on: October 29, 2004, 12:03:30 AM »
Did you take the mensa test?  I thought minimum iq was at least 3 standard deviations

Anyway, with an IQ of 140, you can certainly do a lot better on the lsat.. with sufficient preparation...

Your IQ is reflective of your potential, not of your achievement.

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #39 on: October 29, 2004, 12:11:57 AM »
Did you take the mensa test?  I thought minimum iq was at least 3 standard deviations

Anyway, with an IQ of 140, you can certainly do a lot better on the lsat.. with sufficient preparation...

Your IQ is reflective of your potential, not of your achievement.

Nah, cutoff is the 98th percentile, which is a little over two standard deviations. I'm guessing this guy has a major weakness in a specific area the LSAT targets. Even taking the test cold, someone with an IQ of 140 should be able to do better than 144.