Law School Discussion

LSAT/IQ Conversion Table

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2004, 09:18:50 PM »
They're completely incompatible tests - it's not even worth comparing, even though it's done.

I don't think you quite know what you're talking about.

jaxon

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2004, 09:27:38 PM »
i just dont see how a 120 on the LSAT = 100 IQ.. you have to be pretty damned stupid (way below average) to score that low on the LSAT no?  or is it that the LSAT testing population is that far superior to the population at large so that the lowest 1% = the median person?

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2004, 09:32:10 PM »
i just dont see how a 120 on the LSAT = 100 IQ.. you have to be pretty damned stupid (way below average) to score that low on the LSAT no?  or is it that the LSAT testing population is that far superior to the population at large so that the lowest 1% = the median person?

That's #1 among the many implausibly bizarre things about the conversion table. Is it really believable that about half the population couldn't even get a single answer right? Come on, it's not *that* hard a test.

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2004, 11:01:37 PM »
Bizzare and stupid conversion table.  I wish it was true, or I wish I could trade my IQ points for my LSAT points right this moment.  I'd feel a lot better.

Jennaye

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2004, 12:12:32 AM »
absolutley bull.  I volunteered as a subject for an official, standarized, professionally administered IQ test for psychology grad students to observe, and scored in the genius range.  And yet this stupid test fucks me over.  The LSAT is not geared for people who like to take time and contemplate and philosophize over answers.  And quite frankly, I'd rather have a lawyer who takes that extra five minutes to make sure she's looked at the question from all angles. 

jayhawk

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2004, 12:15:47 AM »
absolutley bull.  I volunteered as a subject for an official, standarized, professionally administered IQ test for psychology grad students to observe, and scored in the genius range.  And yet this stupid test fucks me over.  The LSAT is not geared for people who like to take time and contemplate and philosophize over answers.  And quite frankly, I'd rather have a lawyer who takes that extra five minutes to make sure she's looked at the question from all angles. 

While I agree with you about the time situation with regards to lawyers, aren't most (or all) IQ tests timed?

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #16 on: October 23, 2004, 12:25:41 AM »
Sorry to be the bearer of bad news for the MENSA crowd, but the OP is right.

http://www.us.mensa.org/join_mensa/testscores.php3

HTH

Jennaye

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2004, 12:26:15 AM »

While I agree with you about the time situation with regards to lawyers, aren't most (or all) IQ tests timed?

I took the WAIS (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), and while most sections were timed, the focus wasn't on the rapidity of an answer but the quality.  There wasn't any time cutoff, but I think that after a certain time limit points were deducted (that's just what I inferred -- no actual proof)

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2004, 01:26:11 AM »
Sorry to be the bearer of bad news for the MENSA crowd, but the OP is right.

http://www.us.mensa.org/join_mensa/testscores.php3

HTH

No, he's not. A single point on his table is correct; that doesn't mean the rest are. I used the same 163 = 98th percentile marker and did the correct extrapolation. It's really pretty straightforward.

IQ = 1.5(LSAT) - 113.7

This gives an IQ on the SD 15 scale, which is more commonly used for adult IQ's than SD 16.

Re: LSAT/IQ Conversion Table
« Reply #19 on: October 23, 2004, 03:17:11 AM »
I do not know whether LSAT is correlated with IQ tests, but I do know that SAT scores were a predictor of IQ scores. For example, although no IQ data are available for George W. Bush, we do know that the young Bush registered a score of 1206 on the SAT, the most widely used test of college aptitude. (The more cerebral Al Gore obtained 1355.) Statistically, Bush's test performance places him in the top 16% of prospective college students — hardly the mark of a dimwit. Of course, the SAT is not designed as an IQ test. But it is highly correlated with general intelligence, to the tune of .80. In plain language, the SAT is two parts a measure of general intelligence and one part a measure of specific scholastic reasoning skills and abilities.

If Bush could score in the top 16% of college applicants on the SAT, he would almost certainly rank higher on tests of general intelligence, which are normed with reference to the general population. But even if his rank remained constant at the 84th-percentile level of his SAT score, it would translate to an IQ score of 115. It's tempting to employ Al Gore's IQ:SAT ratio of 134:1355 as a formula for estimating Bush's probable intelligence quotient — an exercise in fuzzy statistics that predicts a score of 119. If the number sounds familiar, it's precisely the IQ score attributed to Kennedy, whom Princeton political scientist Fred Greenstein, in "The Presidential Difference," commended as "a quick study, whose wit was an indication of a subtle mind."