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Author Topic: opinions on bargaining for money  (Read 2017 times)

bobfett33

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2004, 03:42:12 AM »
Need-based is totally different.

siyang

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2004, 10:37:27 AM »
thanks for the advice.
i don't think i am going to ask for more money until they see that my first deposit is in.  i will wait until some other people with scholarships decline hopefully.
i will try to post again to update anybody on my progress in getting more money.
i would love to hear other peoples' experiences as well.
enjoy your days.

jgruber

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2004, 03:49:47 PM »
Get an agent!  Athletes have 'em, why shouldn't law students?    :)

Anti_Ivy

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2004, 03:58:47 PM »
Get an agent!  Athletes have 'em, why shouldn't law students?    :)

Because we (law school applicants/students) don't have the money for an agent.   :-\

dunnolaw

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2004, 10:14:45 AM »
doh...on this subject I sent a message to a Dean of Admissions asking for a full-scholarship after receiving nothing.  I had been working overnight and at about 4 am thought to myself, "hey, I need money from this school if I'm going to go."  I caculated how much money I needed from the total budget figure and not the tuition figure and sent my message on.  The next afternooon I looked at this spreadsheet I have with all my acceptances, offers, costs, and Nalp info and noticed I asked for all but $500 of the tuition.  Ooops!  I sent the letter over a week ago and haven't heard back.  I feel like a real dumbass!  I guess the worst that can happen is they say no but who does that, who asks for a full tuition scholarship after not receiving a dime?  Moral of the story, whatever you decide, plan it out and send your request after you've had a full nights rest.


bobfett33

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2004, 04:53:46 AM »
it might work out to your favor - they lowball you at first (offering nothing).  You counter with an equally inappropriate high sum, and maybe they'll meet you in the middle?

siyang

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2004, 11:02:10 PM »
new question:

what happens to all the scholarship money that is declined by applicants?  i am sure many schools offered outstanding candidates a lot of money, and the students may often will have their choice and choose a different school.  is this money then given to people who come off the waitlist?  or is this simply calculated into their initial decisions on scholarships? 

kslaw

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2004, 10:50:51 AM »
I have a question. How do they calculate need-based stuff?

I received 10k in merit scholarship.

My EFC is $8400, according to FAFSA.

total cost of attending something over $30000.

How does all this work? Can I expect to receive any additional need-based aid? There was a form due on March 1 to be eligible for need-based scholarships. I turned that in, but didn't have my FAFSA on file yet. I have heard nothing as of yet about these need-based scholarships. Not even sure if I qualify as needy by their standards.

Can anyone shed some light on this? now that LSAT anxiety is over and application anxiety is over, I'm now having debt anxiety.

Revenant

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2004, 04:24:56 PM »
I'm not sure how they calculate it but here's some food for thought.

Forms and FAFSA all filed in February, on time, EFC of $0, Total CoA of ~$56000.

$0 Merit (I don't deserve it anyway) but also $0 Need-Based.

Either you have to apply waaaay before the deadline or law schools just don't work the same way as undergrad institutions in regards to financial aid.  At this point, I would be ecstatic with a $4000 per year need-based grant. :(

I have a question. How do they calculate need-based stuff?

I received 10k in merit scholarship.

My EFC is $8400, according to FAFSA.

total cost of attending something over $30000.

How does all this work? Can I expect to receive any additional need-based aid? There was a form due on March 1 to be eligible for need-based scholarships. I turned that in, but didn't have my FAFSA on file yet. I have heard nothing as of yet about these need-based scholarships. Not even sure if I qualify as needy by their standards.

Can anyone shed some light on this? now that LSAT anxiety is over and application anxiety is over, I'm now having debt anxiety.

rcjackson

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Re: opinions on bargaining for money
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2004, 06:51:14 PM »
I was just up front about it.  I said what other school I was considering, and that money was going to be an important factor.  Though the other school was ranked well below the one I was bargaining with, they still matched the offer.

I'd say laying it all out on the line will personalize you, just like your personal statement did what seems like an eternity ago.