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Author Topic: another grammar questions  (Read 715 times)

Engilaw

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another grammar questions
« on: October 08, 2004, 01:10:57 PM »
Alright, here's another grammar question:

Which is correct:

a)  "... the power of a persuasive argument to affect change..."
b)  "... the power of a persuasive argument to effect change..."

affect or effect?

Engilaw

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Re: another grammar questions
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2004, 01:15:58 PM »
affect.

Affect = verb.
Effect = noun.

lexylit

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Re: another grammar questions
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2004, 01:16:39 PM »

Engilaw

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Re: another grammar questions
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2004, 01:21:43 PM »
also, does that sound cliche?

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Re: another grammar questions
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2004, 01:25:48 PM »
Alright, here's another grammar question:

Which is correct:

a)  "... the power of a persuasive argument to affect change..."
b)  "... the power of a persuasive argument to effect change..."

affect or effect?

Engilaw



Check out dictionary.com's definition of effect and affect for more. Particulary defintion 2 for effect versus definition 1 for affect.
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Re: another grammar questions
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2004, 01:26:50 PM »
also, does that sound cliche?

honestly? yes.

Engilaw

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Re: another grammar questions
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2004, 01:51:21 PM »
i just found this on dictionary.com under affect:

Usage Note: Affect and effect have no senses in common. As a verb affect is most commonly used in the sense of “to influence” (how smoking affects health). Effect means “to bring about or execute”: layoffs designed to effect savings. Thus the sentence These measures may affect savings could imply that the measures may reduce savings that have already been realized, whereas These measures may effect savings implies that the measures will cause new savings to come about.

This would mean that I should use "effect"  but if it seems cliche (as ekc says it does) then I'll probably reword.  But thanks for the clarifications!

Engilaw

dta

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Re: another grammar questions
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2004, 02:36:20 PM »
Alright, here's another grammar question:

Which is correct:

a)  "... the power of a persuasive argument to affect change..."
b)  "... the power of a persuasive argument to effect change..."

affect or effect?

Engilaw

This isn't a question of grammar but of semantics. Both are gramatically correct but each has different meaning. Most would intend the meaning of B though.

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Re: another grammar questions
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2004, 11:29:56 AM »
Sorry.  I read too quickly and it bit me in the butt again.  Both can actually be used as either nouns or verbs.