Law School Discussion

Also seeking advice

Also seeking advice
« on: October 07, 2004, 10:19:40 PM »
Hi, I need to make some decisions ASAP and I'd like some honest feedback. I'm a 42 y/o female from Louisiana. I graduated from the University of Louisiana in 1991 with a 3.52 where I received a BS in Psychology. I then went to LSU and obtained a masters in social work. My GPA was around a 3.55 there but my kids were young at the time. I worked in La as a social worker for several years, then moved to AZ about 10 years ago.

After moving to AZ I went to the Police Academy and have been an officer for 8 years. For the past 2 years I have been a detective with the sex crimes unit. I have always wanted to go to law school. My youngest just started college this semester so I decided to go for it.

I began studying about 3 weeks ago and took the Oct LSAT. I know I blew the last two games.(I had to guess b/c I didn't understand how to set them up). I was scoring in the mid to high 150's before I took the test. I practiced but now realize it wasn't near enough. I also took a weekend prep course the weekend before the LSAT.

I want to apply to ASU and LSU. I know I need a 160 or more for ASU and 155 or so for LSU. I also think I can do better on the test but in reading the answers on this website, I seem to have answered pretty much the same as everyone else (for what that's worth)!

My concern is that I scored in the low 150s and will have to score in the mid 160s in Dec. to even have a chance at ASU. I'm wondering if it would be best to cancel and retest? Also, how will this third career change affect my chances? Will the admissions people think I'm a flake?

I know this was really long..sorry. Thanks for any advice you have to offer.

shadowcreeper

  • ****
  • 987
  • LSD Cheerleader
    • View Profile
    • law school hopeful
    • Email
Re: Also seeking advice
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2004, 07:50:42 AM »
I think that if you really want to get into those two schools and you are unsure of how you did on the lsat you should cancel and take the test in December, or even study hard and take it in February and apply for the following year.

Changing jobs three times is not going to make you look bad. It will look like you have built up from one job to the next. In your personal statement note that your jobs showed you that you had an interset in law.

buster

Re: Also seeking advice
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2004, 07:54:27 AM »
I agree with everything in here, with the caveat that you should only cancel your score if you are really pretty sure that you didn't do nearly as well as you think you can do.

I think that if you really want to get into those two schools and you are unsure of how you did on the lsat you should cancel and take the test in December, or even study hard and take it in February and apply for the following year.

Changing jobs three times is not going to make you look bad. It will look like you have built up from one job to the next. In your personal statement note that your jobs showed you that you had an interset in law.

Re: Also seeking advice
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2004, 09:17:57 AM »
Thanks for the advice. I appreciate the suggestions. As far as the LSAT goes, I have realized that being naive or ignorant can really hurt you in this process. I was wondering if the "non-traditional" thing only helps with grades and not the LSAT. I can understand them not focusing on grades you got 15-20 years ago but it seems like that would make the LSAT MORE important. What does everyone think? Also, what about the LOR's for older students? I will have good ones, but not any from Profs. Will that hurt me? Any suggestions for working around this? Thanks again.

DESI

Re: Also seeking advice
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2004, 09:20:27 AM »
we have a few non-trads in my class.  I would like to tell you that in the 3L class, both of the two non-trad people that I know well (from the smokers meeting point) are both in the top 10%.  LS know this and will grant you a concession.  but it is imperative that you are within their LSAT range.