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Author Topic: Should I cancel and retake in December?  (Read 1043 times)

caitrose

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Should I cancel and retake in December?
« on: October 05, 2004, 10:40:20 PM »
I could really use some advice.... :-\
So ever since I took the LSAT this past saturday I've been debating over whether or not to cancel my score.  On my practice tests I had been scoring consistently in the mid 160's.  I wanted to score at least a 164 on the actual test to get into my goal schools.  Now, after the test I am debating over whether to cancel my score.  I felt extremely rushed on one of the logic sections and didn't feel that confident about the games section as I usually do.  I feel like I probably scored in the low 160's (maybe even 159-worst possible case)-but who knows I maybe could have scored 165 if I was lucky-I usually tend to have a lot of doubts after tests.  However, I want to apply for law school this year, but many say that its best to get your apps in early as possible-especially the more competitive schools.  I don't know if I should cancel my score and take the December, which I could probably do better on-but what if I do worse?  Then I have a huge problem-a low score and I'm applying later.  So should I not cancel and retake if my score comes back low, or should I take the risk and cancel and hope that December goes much better?  I'm not sure what I should do...Is anyone in the same situation or have any advice?
Thanks,
Cait 

foxnewssucks

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Re: Should I cancel and retake in December?
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2004, 10:52:56 PM »
is your name Caitlin?  If so, I am not answering.

Jennaye

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Re: Should I cancel and retake in December?
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2004, 11:37:04 PM »
I'm sort of in the same boat... I feel like my score for the actual LSAT will probably be on the low-end of my diagnostics.  But I'm not cancelling; from what I've heard it sounds like re-taking the LSAT is becoming more common and it's not too difficult to convince the admissions board to accept (or at least take notice of) a second, higher score.