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Author Topic: high LSAT mediocre GPA  (Read 20037 times)

cascagrossa

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #30 on: December 24, 2004, 10:19:29 PM »
lol, ill ship them a few rocks to put in their pipes if itll get us in somewhere good.

NYKnicks

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #31 on: December 24, 2004, 10:21:46 PM »
lol, ill ship them a few rocks to put in their pipes if itll get us in somewhere good.

You do that, I'll buy them new pipes too, we are as good as in.

nlyang

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #32 on: December 24, 2004, 10:23:57 PM »
take a look at the users on lawschoolnumbers with the high lsat/low gpa split.  many of them were accepted to top schools all the way up to columbia. 

burghblast

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #33 on: December 24, 2004, 10:55:05 PM »
take a look at the users on lawschoolnumbers with the high lsat/low gpa split.  many of them were accepted to top schools all the way up to columbia. 

Reading LSN graphs is like riding a rollercoaster for me.  First I'll see that a T14 hasn't rejected anyone with an LSAT score as high as mine.  Yay!  Then I'll see that they haven't accepted anyone with a GPA as low as mine.  Oh no!  Then I realize that nobody with an LSAT as high as mine AND a GPA as low as mine has applied.  Great.  Your graphs are worthless.

NYKnicks

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #34 on: December 24, 2004, 11:27:05 PM »
take a look at the users on lawschoolnumbers with the high lsat/low gpa split.  many of them were accepted to top schools all the way up to columbia. 

Reading LSN graphs is like riding a rollercoaster for me.  First I'll see that a T14 hasn't rejected anyone with an LSAT score as high as mine.  Yay!  Then I'll see that they haven't accepted anyone with a GPA as low as mine.  Oh no!  Then I realize that nobody with an LSAT as high as mine AND a GPA as low as mine has applied.  Great.  Your graphs are worthless.

We have applied, they will be worth something soon.

matt1882

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #35 on: January 28, 2005, 09:33:14 AM »
You wrote:
"Iím just fighting it because my GPA would get me into most any T1 but my LSAT (those damn games specifically- I hit 80-85% on LR and RC but 30-35% on games) are keeping me away."


Well, if it makes you feel better, even if GPA were the more important factor for T1, then your GPA actually WOULDN'T get you in. The reason is that far more people have high GPAs (say, 3.7+) than have high LSAT scores (say, 170+). After all, if 150,000 take the LSAT in a given year, the number scoring above 170 will be 2% = 3,000. There are certainly far many more who get 3.7+ GPAs (at my school, this is roughly what you needed to get magna cum laude; and cum laude was something like top 15%. So even at my undergraduate school alone, perhaps 150 people got 3.7+; multiply this by the couple of thousand undergrad schools in the country; or, in terms of law school applicants, 15% of 150,000 = 22,500). So IF T1 schools put the greatest weight on GPA rather than on LSAT, the places would go to the tens of thousands of applicants with very high GPAs, and very many will have higher than your 3.8. So it doesn't make sense to say that, if only LSAT didn't count so much, your GPA would get you into a T1; *IF* LSAT didn't count so much, then the whole model of law school admissions would be turned on its head in the first place
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iluvmydf

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #36 on: February 01, 2005, 01:06:03 AM »
What law schools take into account the reputation of your undergraduate institution? How much does it matter? I have a split- 2.9 gpa and I took one practice LSAT that was between 160-165.  B.A. from the University of Virginia.
I have 4 years excellent work experience.  Should I work longer before applying?
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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #37 on: February 01, 2005, 01:36:19 AM »
It still seems to matter a good deal.  I'm 3.04/172 with 3 yrs of work.
some people go back and get a better gpa in a masters program, but I did not wat to pursue that.
take a look at my lsn... I don't think I'll be getting into UVA, even with a top 10 engineering degree.

What law schools take into account the reputation of your undergraduate institution? How much does it matter? I have a split- 2.9 gpa and I took one practice LSAT that was between 160-165.  B.A. from the University of Virginia.
I have 4 years excellent work experience.  Should I work longer before applying
sometimes I put hot chinese mustard up my nose to see if I'm still alive

Eptisam

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #38 on: February 03, 2005, 09:43:20 PM »
You want a split? Here's a split...

I graduated with a 3.54 gpa in Computer Science, but that was after transferring from Engineering and leaving that program with a 1.9 gpa. So if I calculate my gpa based on all my grades, I go down to a 2.72. Still, I am banking on a addendum where I will state that my gpa in my first two years should have as much weight as my gpa in the program I graduated from.

I looked on the LSAC website and didn't see any mention of this, so I went for the worse case scenario.

The only question mark left is the LSAT, and I still hope to at least score in the high 160s, maybe even in the low 170s (I just did a practice LSAT and scored 171, so it's doable).

pahicks

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Re: high LSAT mediocre GPA
« Reply #39 on: February 06, 2005, 07:51:37 PM »
I dont mean to call into question anyone's justification for providing information (especially considering i am soon to do the same), but I have read quite a few comments that are completely false.

You can very easily find the Admission Index for nearly all schools from lsac.com. That provides a formula of X*LSAT+Y*GPA +C= INDEX.(C=Constant) Each school has their own X and Y that is the result of their dependence on LSAT/GPA. You can very easily use a spreadsheet to plug your own personal LSAT and GPA into the equation to get your Index for the schools. That wont let you compare across schools, but you can then compare your stats to other hypothetical stats.
 For instance, I have a 3.0 and a 170. I can plug in 3.0/170 to get an INDEX number. If i want to plug in a 3.3/165, I get a new index number, which i can compare to my original. That is one way to handle splits, since you convert your split to a more "normal" result.
 Another way is to use some basic calculus to change X*LSAT + Y*GPA = INDEX into 1) (INDEX-C-(Y*GPA))/X  or  2) (INDEX-C-(X*LSAT))/Y   . By doing that, you can compute your original Index (3.0/170) and then plug that Index into your new equation. If you then insert a hypothetical set of GPAs into 1 or LSATS into 2 (170,165,160 into 1) and (3.0, 3.3, 3.5) into 2, you can find the corresponding LSAT/GPA.

I dont know if that makes too much sense to you, but thats the easiest way to change your split (170/3.0) into an identical, but more common (165/3.3) <identical given the school's ratio of GPA and LSAT>.




but be mindful that numbers arent everything at all. a 3.2 Duke Psych major and 165 LSAT (no we, avg ec...) got a FULL RIDE to a top 15 2 years ago (white, male, not economically challenged...) sometimes things just fall your way