Law School Discussion

A rather bleak article on the legal profession

Re: A rather bleak article on the legal profession
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2008, 08:15:41 PM »
Did anyone notice this choice sentence?

Most law schools, Loyola included, grade on a mandatory curve, so half the students finish in the bottom half of their class, typically for the first time in their high-achieving lives.

Yeah, that's it: The CURVE is what makes half the students finish in the bottom half. I'm pretty sure that's basic math -- no, not even math -- just basic definitions of what words mean. Don't newspapers have editors and stuff?

Re: A rather bleak article on the legal profession
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2008, 08:40:07 PM »
Hee. That's my Ks prof at the end there. His kids are cute.

stricly bricly

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Re: A rather bleak article on the legal profession
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2008, 09:40:42 PM »
Let's just say what everyone wants to say: the only people who should go to law school are the ones who did well enough on the LSATs to get into the T25. That is all.

i wonder what the T25 would be like without a Bottom 155.

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Re: A rather bleak article on the legal profession
« Reply #23 on: April 07, 2008, 10:14:16 PM »
your simile and subsequent rolleyes might have a shot at making sense if, for example, Fordham grads were not in competition for jobs with Dozo grads, or even if GULC and GW students weren't interviewing at the exact same firms. 

Re: A rather bleak article on the legal profession
« Reply #24 on: April 12, 2008, 01:23:04 PM »
I just read the article, and from what I am seeing out in the workforce it is true.  Those at the top of my graduating class are making six figures, and the rest are struggling to get by.

Those who cannot pay their bills on 43k/year at gov't offices or small firms go into document review.  Reviewers who can find good long term projects can make 70-80k/year working 50 hrs/week or so, but the work is mind-numbingly boring.  There's also little room for advancement and sometimes very little job security.  Some reviewers become staff attorneys and help manage projects, but its more of the same type of work.  The upside is less stress than an associate's job.

I think most people on this board want to be lawyers, but there are also a lot of people out there who go to law school because they feel like they have nothing better to do or because their parents want them to go.  This article should discourage at least a few of those people from applying to law school.