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Author Topic: American law schools easier to get in?  (Read 2938 times)

ant

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2004, 12:37:18 PM »
Crazy Canuck,

I graduated from U Calgary and am applying to primarily US law schools. I did a bunch of research and basically found out that you can got a law school in the states and work in Canada, but it is pretty much impossible to go the other way unless you are at the top of the class at U of T, which doesn't look like an option.

Canadian firms don't seem to look as heavily at school rankings etc. as they do in the states so graduating from a lower tier school in the states would probably give you better job prospects in Canada than in the states. Particularly if you were interested in corporate and maybe wanted to do something in int'l or having to do w/ NAFTA.

A friend of a friend graduated from some no name law school in the states and landed a pretty sweet job with a firm in Calgary.

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2004, 02:39:52 PM »
Crazy Canuck,

I graduated from U Calgary and am applying to primarily US law schools. I did a bunch of research and basically found out that you can got a law school in the states and work in Canada, but it is pretty much impossible to go the other way unless you are at the top of the class at U of T, which doesn't look like an option.

Canadian firms don't seem to look as heavily at school rankings etc. as they do in the states so graduating from a lower tier school in the states would probably give you better job prospects in Canada than in the states. Particularly if you were interested in corporate and maybe wanted to do something in int'l or having to do w/ NAFTA.

A friend of a friend graduated from some no name law school in the states and landed a pretty sweet job with a firm in Calgary.

I'm not trying to be a jackass, but you you don't need to be the creme de la creme to land a job in US with a Canadian degree.  I know one lawyer personally who has graduated nowhere near the top at Osgoode and is working for a NY firm. 

More importantly, I am not sure about the Alberta Bar, but the Ontario Bar expressely states that you're likey going to need more education when you came back, and it may be as much as two years depending on how you picked your courses in US.  I would contact the Bar Assn' if coming back to Canada was important to me.  Some firms will undoubtedly not care where from US you're coming from.  Others most certainly will. 
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Cheeks

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2004, 02:45:30 PM »
Crazy Canuck,

I graduated from U Calgary and am applying to primarily US law schools. I did a bunch of research and basically found out that you can got a law school in the states and work in Canada, but it is pretty much impossible to go the other way unless you are at the top of the class at U of T, which doesn't look like an option.

Canadian firms don't seem to look as heavily at school rankings etc. as they do in the states so graduating from a lower tier school in the states would probably give you better job prospects in Canada than in the states. Particularly if you were interested in corporate and maybe wanted to do something in int'l or having to do w/ NAFTA.

A friend of a friend graduated from some no name law school in the states and landed a pretty sweet job with a firm in Calgary.

I'm not trying to be a jackass, but you you don't need to be the creme de la creme to land a job in US with a Canadian degree.  I know one lawyer personally who has graduated nowhere near the top at Osgoode and is working for a NY firm. 

More importantly, I am not sure about the Alberta Bar, but the Ontario Bar expressely states that you're likey going to need more education when you came back, and it may be as much as two years depending on how you picked your courses in US.  I would contact the Bar Assn' if coming back to Canada was important to me.  Some firms will undoubtedly not care where from US you're coming from.  Others most certainly will. 

I agree here with caecilius ...

Coming back up to Canada is extremely tough.  The only way you'll get out of some extra school plus a year articling is if you've already been practicing in the states for at least 5 years.  I've also heard that Canadian law firms just flat out don't want to hire Canadians who went to a US law school.  I suppose this makes sense...

Anyways, if you're willing to practice in the states after graduation, then going to the US is a viable option.  But if you were hoping to return to Canada right after school, you may want to reconsider school down there.

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2004, 03:07:53 PM »
Cheeks, there definetely is some bias, especially on Bay Street (this is pretty much first hand information).  Canadian firms aren't stupid.  Unless they see you graduating in top of Tier 1, they will kind of know why you didn't get the degree here. 

Same thing with the people who go after their BA to Oxford Law only to come back without being offered a job.  Again, employees know what the admission standards are.  I'm not trying to persuade anyone from leaving for the US.  It's just that if you're coming back, you may want to consider other options (I think, however, Crazy Canuk has said that moving permanently is fine by him).
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long_gone

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2004, 03:14:39 PM »
And BTW, there's always Windsor (no, this isn't a dig). 
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Cheeks

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2004, 03:20:29 PM »
yeah, I mentioned Windsor too in an earlier post. 

CC - windsor gives you a joint JD/LLB degree so you can practice in either the states or Canada.  And you might get in with your numbers.  I would check it out ... I love UWindsor, but personally hate the law school.  Nothing to do with their program, more the administration.

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2004, 03:28:51 PM »
yeah, I mentioned Windsor too in an earlier post. 

CC - windsor gives you a joint JD/LLB degree so you can practice in either the states or Canada.  And you might get in with your numbers.  I would check it out ... I love UWindsor, but personally hate the law school.  Nothing to do with their program, more the administration.

Cheeks, you are a bright one!  Windsor's LLB/JD is a good option, indeed.  Sure, it's 4 years, but tuition is way less (although considerably more than their usual program) and there are separate spots reserved for this combination. 
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Crazy Canuck

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2004, 03:55:54 PM »
I contacted Windsor about their standardsm still waiting for a response, it would have to be a really easy school to get into be Canadian standards....

Cheeks

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2004, 03:58:37 PM »
they have 'different' stardards, that's for sure.  You can check out information from their website prolly, or from olsas.  They will have a .pdf on each of the ontario law schools. 

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Re: American law schools easier to get in?
« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2004, 11:31:40 PM »
I'm hearing Windsor a lot in this thread as a second "or last" option for law school. I'm not too familiar with their program, but is it that bad? Have their graduates done well?