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Author Topic: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?  (Read 2813 times)

Lawgineer

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Re: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2008, 09:44:03 PM »

The demand for civil engineers in patent law may not be that great.  Most patent applications are electrical and pharmaceutical.  If this is the case going to the higher ranked school may serve you better.  From what I understand, you may find career prospects from a T2 less "fulfilling" than structural engineering (assuming the patent related work is not viable). 

I have actually heard the same thing about civil engineers and patent law.  I'm not sure why you think I would find career prospects from a T2 school less fulfilling but, regardless, I thank you for your input.

MahlerGrooves

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Re: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2008, 10:12:19 PM »
I would also consider Northwestern if I were you.  They like older applicants who have had significant work experience, and you may find that this will mitigate your fairly low GPA in their eyes.  They would probably be your best bet in the T14 unless you get a 175+ on the LSAT.

Thanks!  I'll look into Northwestern as well.  Am I considered an older applicant!?  At 28?  I'll try my hardest at 175+ but I'm also hoping that my undergrad/masters degree programs carry some weight when admissions is reviewing my GPA.  Thanks again!

It's not that you are considered older so much as your extensive work experience and grad degree makes you, at least, a non traditional applicant, and Northwestern LOVES Non-Trads (as does Penn actually - I'm proof!).

And the 175+ thing was a bit hyperbolic.  It's just that your GPA is a little low for most T14s and while your master's and work exp will count more at some places than at others it may not be enough to get you into a school unless your LSAT is high enough for them to sacrifice a high GPA (they care a bit too much about their rankings, IMHO).

Good luck!!!

juliemccoy

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Re: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2008, 05:24:42 PM »
Your GPA is impressive for an engineering major. Unfortunately, the schools submitting their incoming class stats to USNews can't point out lower GPAs and say, "This was a hard sciences major." Due to USNews whoring, all degree programs are thus created equal. It is unfair b/c there is a vast difference between a 3.4 in engineering and a 3.4 in early childhood education.
Vanderbilt 2010

Lawgineer

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Re: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2008, 01:09:05 AM »
Your GPA is impressive for an engineering major. Unfortunately, the schools submitting their incoming class stats to USNews can't point out lower GPAs and say, "This was a hard sciences major." Due to USNews whoring, all degree programs are thus created equal. It is unfair b/c there is a vast difference between a 3.4 in engineering and a 3.4 in early childhood education.

Them's the breaks, I suppose.  Had I known, 10 years ago, that I was going to law school in my late 20's I probably would have picked my UG program a bit differently.  Oh well!  All the more reason to do well on the LSAT, I say.  Speaking of, I'm a bit curious about how long you studied for this thing because I scheduled myself to take it in mid-June '08.  Thanks for your reply, by the way:  Impressive!  Well, I wouldn't go that far... but I'll let you, thanks again!

Lawgineer

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Re: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2008, 01:14:02 AM »
I would also consider Northwestern if I were you.  They like older applicants who have had significant work experience, and you may find that this will mitigate your fairly low GPA in their eyes.  They would probably be your best bet in the T14 unless you get a 175+ on the LSAT.

Thanks!  I'll look into Northwestern as well.  Am I considered an older applicant!?  At 28?  I'll try my hardest at 175+ but I'm also hoping that my undergrad/masters degree programs carry some weight when admissions is reviewing my GPA.  Thanks again!

It's not that you are considered older so much as your extensive work experience and grad degree makes you, at least, a non traditional applicant, and Northwestern LOVES Non-Trads (as does Penn actually - I'm proof!).

And the 175+ thing was a bit hyperbolic.  It's just that your GPA is a little low for most T14s and while your master's and work exp will count more at some places than at others it may not be enough to get you into a school unless your LSAT is high enough for them to sacrifice a high GPA (they care a bit too much about their rankings, IMHO).

Good luck!!!

Point taken.  Northwestern will probably be on my list of schools as well if they love Non-Trads so much, I'll have to look into Penn a bit more.  Thanks for the luck, I'll need it!

likewise

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Re: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2008, 08:49:34 AM »
Prepare for the LSAT as best you can (individually and/or prep class [anything but Kaplan]) and take it. When you receive your scores, you can begin to consider what your options are. You have some very good advice above ITT.  Remember, though, no matter what your UG degree is, where it's from, what your work experience is...the LSAT is king.  Excepting rare circumstances, the exam will account for 50%-75% of your application package to schools.

vjm

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Re: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2008, 10:07:34 AM »
I prepped on my own, with what I now know to be shoddy materials. My score reflects it. I have heard the Powerscore Bibles and class can be very effective, as well as taking MANY old tests.

Don't take it until you are reliable scoring in the range you want to be, and pitch that range slightly higher than you need. Most folks seems to score lower on the big day (although not all).

As a fellow profession jumper (chef), good for you and good luck!

juliemccoy

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Re: Adding a new profession. What are my chances?
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2008, 10:22:08 AM »
I prepped for too long and burned myself out. I think 3 months is more than enough time-- I think you should take some practice tests on your own and use your own study materials and THEN enroll in a prep course like TestMasters, Blueprint or PowerScore. (My opinion and echoing scores of others on the LSD boards: Avoid Kaplan and Princeton Review for the LSAT.)

Once you have an LSAT score in hand, you can figure out where you want to go. I think that given your engineering background and good engineering GPA that you'll kill the LSAT-- the exam is all about logic and you're used to solving complex problems. Good luck!!! Take it in June. The best thing about the LSAT is that the schools will take the higher of our scores if you retake it (compared with the past where they averaged your multiple scores).
Vanderbilt 2010