Law School Discussion

SAT to LSAT predictor

lexylit

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2004, 11:11:40 AM »
163 isn't 98th percentile. However, if you adjusted the figures, I'd be interested in playing with an ACT/LSAT predictor.

i think the implication is that the 90-something%ile of lsat takers (whatever 163 is) corresponds to the 98th percentile of human beings, b/c the population taking lsats is not representative of the population at large.

FSF17

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2004, 11:22:17 AM »
I'm guessing the "general population" is supposed to be all the people who take the SAT and not the actual general population?

lexylit

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2004, 11:23:32 AM »
I'm guessing the "general population" is supposed to be all the people who take the SAT and not the actual general population?

not necessarily true, as the OP factored in IQs for high school grads (who don't all take SATs)

FSF17

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2004, 11:26:41 AM »
I'm just wondering why the actual general population should factor into this equation to begin with. IF some guy never took either test, why should he be included in the equation? I just don't think it's a very representative model.

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2004, 11:30:54 AM »
163 isn't 98th percentile. However, if you adjusted the figures, I'd be interested in playing with an ACT/LSAT predictor.

i think the implication is that the 90-something%ile of lsat takers (whatever 163 is) corresponds to the 98th percentile of human beings, b/c the population taking lsats is not representative of the population at large.

Right. 163 is in the 90th percentile for LSAT takers, but overall, it represents a significantly higher percentile for the general population. Mensa's cutoff is 163, and they take people in the 98th percentile and above. I assume this is accurate -- they tend to be pretty obsessive about this stuff.

The real number to be concerned about is what percentile of the general population a 1020 SAT scores correponds with. 75th percentile is an extremely rough guess, based off the commonly accepted notion by psychometricians that the average IQ of a high school grad is 110. Do roughly 25% of people ages 17 and 18 take the SAT? This seems plausible. Any significant deviation from this though and the numbers will be off.

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2004, 11:36:14 AM »
I'm just wondering why the actual general population should factor into this equation to begin with. IF some guy never took either test, why should he be included in the equation? I just don't think it's a very representative model.

I'm putting it in terms of the general population because then I can match it up with SAT scores. I don't have any data on which SAT scores match up with which LSAT scores, percetile-wise. However, I have data about which LSAT scores match up with which IQ's, as well as which SAT scores match up with which IQ's. This is the "common denominator" that allows for conversion between the two. It doesn't really have anything to do with IQ's, per se, it's just a handy means of finding percentile equivalencies.

lexylit

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2004, 11:36:47 AM »
your estimate was low--

Forty-six percent of this year's high school graduates took the SAT - the highest percentage ever.
The percentage of minority students taking the SAT is also at an all-time high of 35 percent.

http://www.collegeboard.com/press/article/0,,11752,00.html

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2004, 11:43:27 AM »
your estimate was low--

Forty-six percent of this year's high school graduates took the SAT - the highest percentage ever.
The percentage of minority students taking the SAT is also at an all-time high of 35 percent.

http://www.collegeboard.com/press/article/0,,11752,00.html

Thanks for the info, I was looking for something like that. Still, it doesn't give me as much as I need -- the population of high school graduates is going to be quite a bit brighter than the population as a whole. Though it shouldn't be hard to get that info if I can find the percentage of people graduating high school these days.

FSF17

Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2004, 11:44:11 AM »
I'm just wondering why the actual general population should factor into this equation to begin with. IF some guy never took either test, why should he be included in the equation? I just don't think it's a very representative model.

I'm putting it in terms of the general population because then I can match it up with SAT scores. I don't have any data on which SAT scores match up with which LSAT scores, percetile-wise. However, I have data about which LSAT scores match up with which IQ's, as well as which SAT scores match up with which IQ's. This is the "common denominator" that allows for conversion between the two. It doesn't really have anything to do with IQ's, per se, it's just a handy means of finding percentile equivalencies.

Gotcha. I guess I misread your first post.

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Re: SAT to LSAT predictor
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2004, 11:48:16 AM »
Your equation gave me a 171.  Correct percentile  :)