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Author Topic: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?  (Read 3073 times)

Trivium

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #20 on: March 15, 2008, 09:28:24 PM »
Personally I don't think that work experience is really at all valuable to a lawyer's future success. In many cases I think it just shows adcomms that you're responsible. As soon as you graduate you start getting work experience so I don't think it really matters for future success since you're going to get it anyway.

So you don't think it's valuable to learn to manage employees, network with contacts and sell your services?  Most lawyers that I've talked to say that Law School doesn't do very much to prepare them for the actual job, so do you think law school is unnecessary too?  I mean, you're going to learn it on the job anyway?

I actually do think law school is close to unnecessary. It doesn't really do that much to prepare you for the job and it actually developed more as a way to regulate who could and couldn't practice law. Sort of like what doctors did to regulate their profession and keep midwives out.

SteelersandGators

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2008, 10:14:35 PM »
I feel like you two have good points.
I guess there really isn't any way to know for sure if GPA or work experience is more valuable to a lawyer's future success.  Try not to assume that my GPA was low because I didn't have enough time to study due to my job.  My GPA was low because I felt like I had found my career and there was really no reason to worry about getting anything better than a B average.  You have to remember that there is a difference between a lack of motivation and a lack of ability.  I was lucky enough to find my true motivation and now I'm a completely different person.  I don't expect anyone to take my word for it, and now it's time for me to go to my T2 school and prove that I'm better than a 3.4.   



Well, the problem is, there is no way for an admissions committee to know why you had a 3.0. All they see is your GPA. They don't really have the time, information, or incentive to know the details of your situation. There are no interviews...and even if there was, I'm not sure you would want to tell them that it was a lack of motivation...
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Slumdog Lovebutton

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2008, 11:44:02 PM »
They'll think the 3.7 will be a better student and they think he'll help their ranking more, so no, it won't cloud their judgment.
I am more valuable as a 3.4 student with 4 years of full time employment than I would have been with a 3.7 and one summer internship.

I disagree.  You seem kind of obnoxious and whiny.  Is the 3.7 kid any less self-conscious?




Jk.  ...kind of.   ;)
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jack24

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2008, 11:26:54 AM »
I'm sorry if it seems like I think a Bachelors in Business is hard.  I don't think it is.  I studied business (finance) for my current career.  If I wasn't already in a career type job, I would have studied something else.  The reason I got a 3.4, is because I already had a job, and they didn't care about GPA.  I graduated two years ago, and now I want to go to law school.  Business is an EASY degree, but my background in Finance and Sales WILL SURELY help me in the future as an attorney that specializes in banking and corporate law.
I may be whiny, and I'm definetely obnoxious :), but I'll be a really good lawyer. 
I started this post to get opinions on the relationship between Undergrad GPA and sucess as a future lawyer, and apparently most people on this site think that the correlation is very strong.  I aggree with that only because high GPA gets students into better schools, better schools place students in better jobs, better jobs pay more.

devilishlyblue

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2008, 02:37:42 PM »
No, we just think that the correlation isn't negative.

MahlerGrooves

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2008, 02:40:03 PM »
No, we just think that the correlation isn't negative.

Nor do we think that the correlation should be ignored simply in your case.  AdComms are not psychic.  They go with numbers because, MOST times, numbers are accurate.

UnbiasedObserver

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2008, 02:55:39 PM »
No, we just think that the correlation isn't negative.

Nor do we think that the correlation should be ignored simply in your case.  AdComms are not psychic.  They go with numbers because, MOST times, numbers are accurate.

I might have said this 500,000 times, but I'll say it again: the LSAT and GPA only account for 25% of the variation in 1L grades.

That means that 75% of the variation in grades is unaccounted for.

So I don't know if we can really go as far to say that MOST times the numbers are accurate.  They're a good tool to use, but I often feel that they are used a little too extensively. 

MahlerGrooves

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #27 on: March 17, 2008, 03:10:36 PM »
No, we just think that the correlation isn't negative.

Nor do we think that the correlation should be ignored simply in your case.  AdComms are not psychic.  They go with numbers because, MOST times, numbers are accurate.

I might have said this 500,000 times, but I'll say it again: the LSAT and GPA only account for 25% of the variation in 1L grades.

That means that 75% of the variation in grades is unaccounted for.

So I don't know if we can really go as far to say that MOST times the numbers are accurate.  They're a good tool to use, but I often feel that they are used a little too extensively. 

Then I will modify my position slightly to include the fact that numbers impact rankings, and maintaining a school's ranking or increasing it are part of an AdComm's job.

devilishlyblue

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #28 on: March 17, 2008, 03:16:08 PM »
No, we just think that the correlation isn't negative.

Nor do we think that the correlation should be ignored simply in your case.  AdComms are not psychic.  They go with numbers because, MOST times, numbers are accurate.

I might have said this 500,000 times, but I'll say it again: the LSAT and GPA only account for 25% of the variation in 1L grades.

That means that 75% of the variation in grades is unaccounted for.

So I don't know if we can really go as far to say that MOST times the numbers are accurate.  They're a good tool to use, but I often feel that they are used a little too extensively. 

Say instead that they're more likely to be an indicator than a misleading indicator -- that is, that they're very unlikely to HARM your selection if the other 75% is hard to find.

UnbiasedObserver

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Re: Which student would an Admissions Committee pick?
« Reply #29 on: March 17, 2008, 03:22:52 PM »
No, we just think that the correlation isn't negative.

Nor do we think that the correlation should be ignored simply in your case.  AdComms are not psychic.  They go with numbers because, MOST times, numbers are accurate.

I might have said this 500,000 times, but I'll say it again: the LSAT and GPA only account for 25% of the variation in 1L grades.

That means that 75% of the variation in grades is unaccounted for.

So I don't know if we can really go as far to say that MOST times the numbers are accurate.  They're a good tool to use, but I often feel that they are used a little too extensively. 

Then I will modify my position slightly to include the fact that numbers impact rankings, and maintaining a school's ranking or increasing it are part of an AdComm's job.

Most schools purport very lofty ideals. 

I think they should also hold lofty ideals in the realm of admissions. 

Yes, I know there are rankings.  However, why don't they fight the system?  I don't mean just a little letter that's on the LSAC website.  I'm talking about letters to the NY Times, and maybe making their own ranking system.