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Author Topic: Curves at law schools and how do they work?  (Read 17706 times)

Refused Party Program

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2008, 10:33:34 PM »
Well, I guess there really is no way to completely avoid the unfairness you are talking about. I can only describe what happens here.

First, all students are ranked against the entire class.

Second, the way Emory divides sections, you end up mixing up with everyone else. There are six sections. Each class is a combination of two sections (except Torts which is only one and the writing/research class that is like two half sections combined). So, by the end of your first year, you have at least one class with every student.

This has two advantages. First, you only have to be with the same 40 people all the time instead of the same 80. Second, it mitigates the unfairness you are talking about.

Also, keep in mind, the majority of grades in a any given class are B's or B+'s. While professors have discretion, they tend to clump more in the middle so there are less C's and B-'s.

However, that is just how we do it. I have read on this board how at some schools where they give scholarships based on being above say a 3.2, they will section all of the scholarship kids together, so there is no way they can all maintain their money. Don't know if it is true, just doing my part to perpetuate the rumor. 

StudentUVA

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2008, 08:45:35 PM »
I'm curious as to how this gets equalized across sections in LS. Is the top 1/3 of each section calculated, and that becomes the top 1/3 of the class (entire 1L class)? If the teacher's have discretion to give higher or lower grades, that's the only way that seems fair. Otherwise, if a teacher (ore more than one) in a section likes giving out A+'s, you could have a much higher ratio of higher ranked students in one section, which I don't believe actually ever happens.

Anybody know? 
Here we have mixed classes, so you'll have some classes just with your section, and other classes with 2 or 3 other sections. Most professors don't give out A+'s (at most 1 or 2 it seems if they do). Your second semester you have electives, so  you're not in any section, although you still take 2 classes with your and one other section.

AspenLizzy

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2008, 01:33:29 AM »
Miami's curve is nasty at 2.9. Also look at what grades they offer. For example we only have A, B+, B, C+, C, etc. Not having an A plus or minus sucks.

Lindbergh

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2008, 06:56:20 AM »
At least at my school the prof has discretion on how to distribute grades to create the median.

If the curb is a B+, the proffessor is within his/her discression to give every person in the class a B+, or to give out only As and Cs with nothing in between.

If the prof only gave out A's and C's, then the median couldn't be a B+. It would either be an A or a C.

dpwc

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2008, 09:46:17 AM »
At least at my school the prof has discretion on how to distribute grades to create the median.

If the curb is a B+, the proffessor is within his/her discression to give every person in the class a B+, or to give out only As and Cs with nothing in between.

If the prof only gave out A's and C's, then the median couldn't be a B+. It would either be an A or a C.

It could also be a B.

Lindbergh

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2008, 02:04:51 PM »
At least at my school the prof has discretion on how to distribute grades to create the median.

If the curb is a B+, the proffessor is within his/her discression to give every person in the class a B+, or to give out only As and Cs with nothing in between.

If the prof only gave out A's and C's, then the median couldn't be a B+. It would either be an A or a C.


It could also be a B.

Nope.  The median is the grade of the student that's right in the middle of the entire class.  If no student gets a B, there's no way the median can be a B (even though the Curve itself could be set at B or B+).

dpwc

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2008, 04:01:36 AM »
Nope.  The median is the grade of the student that's right in the middle of the entire class.  If no student gets a B, there's no way the median can be a B (even though the Curve itself could be set at B or B+). 

If there are an odd number of students, then yes, it would have to be an A or C. However if there are an even number of students and 1/2 get As and 1/2 get Cs then the median will be a B.

nealric

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2008, 05:06:29 PM »
Quote

If the prof only gave out A's and C's, then the median couldn't be a B+. It would either be an A or a C.

Geez- I didn't mean literally  ::)
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Now who's being naive?

Lindbergh

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Re: Curves at law schools and how do they work?
« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2008, 04:12:14 AM »
Nope.  The median is the grade of the student that's right in the middle of the entire class.  If no student gets a B, there's no way the median can be a B (even though the Curve itself could be set at B or B+). 

If there are an odd number of students, then yes, it would have to be an A or C. However if there are an even number of students and 1/2 get As and 1/2 get Cs then the median will be a B.

Fair enough. In that unlikely event, the median would be composed of the mean of the two middle students, which would then be a B.